Wisdom//

What Happened When I Gave Up on My Teenage Dream

Some passions are meant to stay passions.

Ignia Andrei/ Shutterstock
Ignia Andrei/ Shutterstock

Since I was very, very young, I always knew who I wanted to be as I grew up. I knew exactly what I wanted to do, even if it did change occasionally as I grew older.

I considered being a film director, an astronaut, a singer, a hairdresser and, most of all, a writer. However, being a novelist felt unattainable – who would pay for me to write about what I love?

From the age of 18 onwards, I wanted to be a music writer. Why? Because I loved music, and I loved writing. Plus, that could turn into a career — right?

 Being a music journalist became my dream, and it seemed like the perfect match. 

First, I did what I do best: I practised. I started writing in two different languages (for Italian publications and in English for my online blog). I would spend days and days listening to records, writing after University classes, and going to questionable gigs and friendly neighbour festivals.

I read the whole history of rock and roll, and got my very own version of a fast-track training experience in music. A few years later, I moved from my native Italy to the UK, and I started applying my social media skills, and writing to help a handful of record labels with their PR, all whilst working in a restaurant and writing on the side.

I was so clear about my path, and even if it meant a lot of unpaid work, I knew I was getting closer. I interviewed intentional artists, and shook hands with some of my idols. For eight years, all I desperately wanted was a lucky break. 

One day, that lucky break came to me in the form of an internship for a PR company in London. At the same time, I got accepted for a paid internship as a community manager for an event start-up.

I decided to move from sunny Somerset, and head to the big city, working multiple jobs (and internships) whilst cultivating my big dream as a music journalist and publicist.

After a few months of filling spreadsheets and updating webpages, nothing really came out of it. 

Until I was given a choice.

The struggle of choosing between your passion and your future

Life can be ironic sometimes — I definitely see the irony when I look back at the week that I got offered two opportunities.

I could follow my dream and become a full time paid intern for the agency for six months, or I could take a junior position as social and community manager for the event start-up.

I could not sleep for an entire week. The second option meant better pay, a better position, and more hands on training on the marketing aspects of running a business. But still, I had a dream, and for the first time people were recognising that I had potential.

For the first time in my life, I did not follow the life plan I had so carefully drafted for myself, and I went with my gut, against all of the odds.

As you may have guessed, I am not a music journalist or a PR person.

I said no to my lucky break, knowing that if I was meant to become an award-winning journalist, I would find a way.

That job I took lasted a short-lived nine months (start-up life means that budgets can sometimes be brutal). Those nine months taught me everything I know and believe in about resilience, leadership, marketing, and growth. Those nine months also had me in a terrible job where I was not recognised or acknowledged for my experience. I despised it much that I ended up starting my own business(es). 

That choice I made allowed me to become an award-winning entrepreneur, the founder of a global company, a published author, and a paid writer.

The biggest lesson I learned

Some passions are meant to stay passions. Sometimes the best thing you can do when it comes the things you love is not pursue them as a career path. 

My gut was telling me not to follow my dream and push myself in another direction. I am so happy I followed that feeling in my tummy and went for it. 

I thought my dream was to be a music journalist because I wanted to make an impact in people’s lives, but the truth is that what I really wanted was to make an impact in people’s lives with my writing. Letting go of who I thought I should become allowed me to become the real me.

Follow us here and subscribe here for all the latest news on how you can keep Thriving. 

Stay up to date or catch-up on all our podcasts with Arianna Huffington here.

Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

How a Polish-American Became an Expert in Black Gospel Music
Community//

How a Polish-American Became an Expert in Black Gospel Music

by Laurel Delaney
Community//

Rising Music Star Justine Glaser, of Blue Midnight: “Keep and honor all of your promises; Never make a promise you can’t keep”

by Yitzi Weiner
Community//

Rising Star Brittany Portman: “Take your time — do not rush to get your product done”

by Yitzi Weiner

Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

Thrive Global
People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.