Community//

“THE ONE MAN SHOW”

The dichotomous function and weakness of the egoic mind lies within the perceived survival mechanism labeled as fear.The intrinsic nature of man’s well being seeks love, acceptance and belonging .The invisible anchors which tug at our emotional attachments hide behind the curtains of our theatre’s stage.The stages where we play the many characters which define […]

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The dichotomous function and weakness of the egoic mind lies within the perceived survival mechanism labeled as fear.

The intrinsic nature of man’s well being seeks love, acceptance and belonging .
The invisible anchors which tug at our emotional attachments hide behind the curtains of our theatre’s stage.

The stages where we play the many characters which define our self fulfilled identity…

We manifest through the habituated thoughts which created what we believe as truth.

Those beliefs created a perceived reality which begins from an invisible thought of the mind.
The formless becomes form through emotional associations in the many roles on the stages we play.

Mans deep need for the egos binary roles of proving superiority and fearing inferiority become outsourced by the validation of the ultilitarian function in the external world.

The interplay with the characters that intercept their roles on your stage…a scene from a finite moment in time among the infinite possibilities of life manifestos.

The dark driver of fear haunts the ego to seek attachment and identification through victory of ownership.

The ownership of what is mine, what I am, what belongs to me and who I belong to gradually overpowers the roles we play and encapsulates our concept of identity to self.

Purpose becomes the slave to the role that pacified the egos need to be enough, be loved and be wanted which parallels the intrinsic need within our soul within the many dimensions of our matrix.


Attachment to the definitive beliefs of identity… Transforms the stage, the roles, the characters from form to formless.

The malady created by the egoic mind to feed a need for superiority and applause from the the only true audience watching the one man show… The I within self.


The malady that creates emotional attachment to all that exists outside… Where contentment, inner peace and happiness are no longer yours to protect.

They become external limitations that have been conceptualized into physical form…
Tangible yet fleeting derivatives from trivial warfare… superfluous, self derived disassociations from what is found within.

Be open to everything and attached to nothing.
The only limitations in life are the ones we identify ourselves with.
It is then you are truly free from the confines of the story in the act.

The character of the role you believe is yours transmutating to the playwright directing the second half in this life..

Katherine Tran

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