Community//

‘The Foxfires’: “Learn to fail forward. Failure is inevitable”

We’d like a universal call to empathy. We’d like to see people see each other and our surroundings as just extensions of ourselves. It’s a fundamental principle of most religions- treat others how you’d like to be treated. At the end of the day, we have the same needs- food, water, shelter, clothing, healthcare, peace of […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres on our open platform. We publish pieces as written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team and must meet our guidelines prior to being published.

We’d like a universal call to empathy. We’d like to see people see each other and our surroundings as just extensions of ourselves. It’s a fundamental principle of most religions- treat others how you’d like to be treated.

At the end of the day, we have the same needs- food, water, shelter, clothing, healthcare, peace of mind, purpose, validation, acceptance, and companionship. People do everything they do based on those needs. You wouldn’t know whether we are describing someone from a particular political party, race, gender, sexuality, or religion if we said that XYZ person is just doing what they can to provide for themselves or their families. People do what they do because it’s what they know. People more than likely want to do the right thing, regardless of whether or not it’s right or wrong. The plague that holds humanity back is the attitude of ignorance and apathy- “I don’t know and I don’t care.” Try to see yourself in someone else, regardless of how hard it can be to do so at times. The cure to ignorance is knowledge. The cure for apathy is care. Let’s start learning, listening, and loving and we may see a time when we put aside superficial differences to take on existential problems.


As a part of our series about rising music stars, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing The Foxfires.

Formed in 2013, The Foxfires were quick to cultivate their own unique sound and subgenre called Seagaze, combining the psychedelic nature of shoegaze, the energy and dance of pop-rock and post-punk, and the oceanic ambience of surf rock with a positive message. Their ethos radiates fluidity, optimism and an organic sense of togetherness. They have performed over 450 shows across the East Coast, South, and Midwest while releasing five singles, two EPs, and one full length record. Receiving praise from Paste Magazine, Impose and many more, the band has quickly developed a loyal following of fans that embrace their innovative nature and overwhelmingly positive spirit. Successful sync placements include Discovery Networks, Homemade Soul Music, Audiosparks, Roadtrip Nation, NASCAR, and Bring Your Own Board Music Libraries. Having headlined at the United Airlines Rock ’n’ Roll Marathon, the East Coast Music Conference, the Hudson Valley Music Summit and many more, it’s no question their energy thrives in a live setting. Since The Foxfires cannot play for a live audience in 2020, they’ve decided to bring the same radiant energy to the studio to produce hits like “Orion” for fans and followers to play when they need a dose of positivity in a year like 2020.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

We grew up in the suburbs of the NYC Metropolitan area. CD (Christian Diana) was raised in Rockland County, NJ and Adam and CC (Christian Cordero) grew up in Passaic County, NJ. We were all relatively alone as youths, either directly and indirectly. Our mutual love was always music. It’s what healed us; what comforted us; what sheltered us; what connected us; and what made sense to us. It’s ultimately how we became a band.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

In late Summer and Early Fall of 2013, CC and Adam met CD at a small open mic in Ridgewood, NJ. CD suggested to CC that they should get together and jam at his space in Nyack, NY across from the Palisades Center. The rest is ancient history. We met by patronizing local coffee shops and supporting a local music community and have stayed together with a little help from that coffee and a passion for each other, our music, and our community.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

Someone once proposed in front of us as we were headlining a festival. In Darlington, MD in 2018, we headlined at PEX: Summer Fest. It’s what’s commonly referred to as a transformational festival or a Burner Festival. When we met the organizers at the event, they said the most truly uplifting thing we’ve ever been told by anyone who has been kind enough to book us- “Welcome home.” They gave Adam a sweatband right out of their own bag, just because. Genuinely warm and surreal stuff. There were a few thousand people dancing and enjoying life next to a gigantic effigy on a really scenic campground. It must have been the second song into our set and this young couple stopped just in front of the stage. This guy gets down on one knee in front of everyone and proposes to his fiancé. It’s one of our favorite moments we can remember.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

On our first tour, we brought this long board along with us to enjoy when we were playing at Virginia Beach. On the first night, while we were on our way down towards the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, we stopped at this rest stop in South Jersey and Adam and CD were slightly stoned at the time. CD decided to give it a whirl in the parking lot and wound up tearing up his hand a bit. We cleaned him up in a rest stop bathroom, but his palms were pretty chewed up. This made playing his guitar pretty painful for the duration of the tour. The lesson here is- don’t burn yourself out on the first night of the tour.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

We’re very excited for what is to come of Orion and for the album it belongs to. Because of the pandemic and the lack of shows recently, our plans shifted over the course of 2020. We had originally planned a full-length release for this year, with our label, Brink Records. We felt because of the events of this year, that promoting a single that we had been excited about for awhile would be a nice hold over going into 2021. We have three other songs ready and recorded and we’ll inevitably finish the full length and release it in 2021. We’re just excited to get back to playing shows.

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

  1. The world is not binary. It’s hardly even Octagonal. There are many different types of people in the world and they deserve to feel like they have a voice. They deserve to feel like there is a place for them.
  2. It’s been neglected for many, many years and it perpetuates a divide among people who can be moved by culture. The question shouldn’t be, “Is having women, the LGBTQIA+ community, People of Color, or disabled people represented important?” It should be, “Why hasn’t this been important and has its lack of importance separated us further and distracted us from what unite us all?”
  3. More diversity doesn’t mean less voices- it means less inequity. It means more empowerment and less fear.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Never pay-to-play when you are first starting, unless you can sell the tickets outright and they will pay you justly for that. Your time is valuable and so is your music. You’re an artist. Don’t burn yourself out before your art gets the fair shake it deserves.
  2. Communication is key and don’t sleep on communicating with your bandmates.
  3. Use the internet first and foremost. It will be all encompassing and it’s just as important as live music.
  4. Read every contract with scrutiny and make sure a lawyer reads it thoroughly.
  5. Learn to fail forward. Failure is inevitable. Things happen. Don’t be disheartened or give up- learn from your mistakes and if possible learn from others’ mistakes.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

Budget your time into the things that are important for your career in music, but also budget them for the things that are also important. Your family, health, Lazlo Hierarchical Needs, and interpersonal relationships are your foundation. Don’t neglect them. Also, for whatever amount of time you spend playing a show, spend 4 times that making that show a good show; either by planning it, booking a good show, promoting it, or being your own PR team.

You are people of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

We’d like a universal call to empathy. We’d like to see people see each other and our surroundings as just extensions of ourselves. It’s a fundamental principle of most religions- treat others how you’d like to be treated.

At the end of the day, we have the same needs- food, water, shelter, clothing, healthcare, peace of mind, purpose, validation, acceptance, and companionship. People do everything they do based on those needs. You wouldn’t know whether we are describing someone from a particular political party, race, gender, sexuality, or religion if we said that XYZ person is just doing what they can to provide for themselves or their families. People do what they do because it’s what they know. People more than likely want to do the right thing, regardless of whether or not it’s right or wrong. The plague that holds humanity back is the attitude of ignorance and apathy- “I don’t know and I don’t care.” Try to see yourself in someone else, regardless of how hard it can be to do so at times. The cure to ignorance is knowledge. The cure for apathy is care. Let’s start learning, listening, and loving and we may see a time when we put aside superficial differences to take on existential problems.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

We have a few father figures to our band. Few have been as instrumental as one of our good friends, Freddy Hernandez of DIY Radio. Freddy is this east coast local music scene veteran who has been a supporter, a fan, a friend, and a mentor since our first year as a band. We met at this show in Nyack, NY and he immediately got what we were about. We dorked out over old bands, new bands, local bands, and bands that shaped who we became. Freddy has kept us level through thick and thin. He’s always looked out for us and been a tenured voice of reason for us. He hosts a radio show called DIY Radio for WFDU in Teaneck, NJ where he continues to look out for bands like us. The world needs more people like Freddy.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Be like water.” It’s a Bruce Lee quote, specifically. It’s the ethos and pathos to our music and how we continue to adapt and go with the flow of where life takes us.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

This might be the one person many musicians like us would adore to have some kind of meal with and it’s Dave Grohl. We’re heads for Foo Fighters and it doesn’t hurt that Dave happens to be the nicest guy in Rock and Roll. He’s this cult like figure nowadays, where he’s a staunch defender of local music; bands; new musicians, virtuosos, undiscovered talent; the value of venues; scenes; studios, monumental talents lost to or pedestalize rightfully by time; doing the right thing; and being a down to earth grateful guy. He wakes up happy every morning just to be Dave Grohl and do Dave Grohl things. He is so self-aware that he’s not just talented, but lucky and we aspire to be as grateful and self-aware of how lucky we are to get to do what we do.

How can our readers follow you online?

You can find us on:

Facebook — www.facebook.com/TheFoxfires

Twitter — www.twitter.com/TheFoxfires

Instagram — www.instagram.com/TheFoxfires

Spotify — https://open.spotify.com/artist/0ofPkbfrMwwaVGsXTzYMVu

Website — www.thefoxfires.com

This was very meaningful, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!

Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

Image by SeaReeds from Pixabay
Community//

7 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT ATHEISTS

by Samantha Mirandola
No opportunity is the same
Community//

How Saying Yes Sparks an Attitude of Opportunity

by Frances Hickmott
Community//

Can religion make you happier?

by Will Jelbert
We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.