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The Effect of Social & Romantic Relationships on Individual Mental Health

It is said that loving and fruitful relationships are the most rewarding experiences during one’s lifetime. However, the term relationship is often misconstrued to solely represent romantic intimacy. On the contrary, human beings are exposed to numerous relationships. Initially, one’s familial bonds are their most important ties with either parents, siblings or extended family forming […]

Anxiety disorder menopause woman, stressful depressed emotional person with mental health illness, headache and migraine sitting feeling bad sadly with back against wall on the floor in domestic home
Anxiety disorder menopause woman, stressful depressed emotional person with mental health illness, headache and migraine sitting feeling bad sadly with back against wall on the floor in domestic home

It is said that loving and fruitful relationships are the most rewarding experiences during one’s lifetime.

However, the term relationship is often misconstrued to solely represent romantic intimacy.

On the contrary, human beings are exposed to numerous relationships. Initially, one’s familial bonds are their most important ties with either parents, siblings or extended family forming the core group that shapes early development.

As an individual ages, they are exposed to new environments such as school where they begin to interact with a wide variety of people and forming social relationships. These can then develop further to romantic coupling if and when the time is right.

The one thing all these relationships have in common is their ability to offer both happiness and solace in times of need.

Any social or romantic interaction is based on commonality. This may be common interests such as a love of sports or similar life goals like starting a family.

It is this commonality that enables all persons close to us to ground us whenever we are overwhelmed.

We place trust in these people to share in our deepest, darkest secrets and offer applicable advice whenever called upon.

If the aforementioned persons were to work against our individual welfare, the relationship becomes strained and that is how friends seize to interact or romantic partners decide to part ways.

But the key question is: does uncoupling present the sole solution to the problem?

Obviously, in a strained relationship, whether social or romantic, walking away presents a simple means through which one can alleviate the mental strain that comes with it.

However, we must consider how alienating one of the vital cogs in one’s life can affect their mental health.

Routine is a major part of human existence and losing even a singular aspect of it could have catastrophic mental connotations.

Most persons reading this have been through one or more breakups-whether it is romantic or simply disagreements with a close friend.

At the time, the reason behind the discord always seemed like the worst thing in the world. Maybe they betrayed your confidence or were unfaithful to you.

Now, out of sheer anger and hatred, most human minds are tuned to act irrationally or slightly out of character.

It is moments after the rash decision that we regain our senses and regret making certain decisions.

This is prevalent in both social and romantic relationships whereby partners walk away in search of supposed peace of mind whilst forgetting all the comforts the deserted relationship brought to them.

It is only when you wake up the next day and realize nobody sent you that cute “Good morning, how did you sleep” text that you begin reevaluating your entire decision.

You may have been chasing piece of mind and independence, but what you get is lengthy period of anxiety, depression and loneliness.

Therefore, I urge you all, whenever you are faced with a crossroads in your respective relationships, do not be hasty to eradicate what you believe is the cause of the problem. Take some time to think about what life would mean without the aforementioned offender because I promise you, rebuilding a bond is much simpler on your mental health than nursing a lost relationship.

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