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The Art of Detachment – Do You Allow People or Events to Change?

The brain has a way of trying to make sense of the new information we are exposed to. The unconscious mind tries to link every thought, sound, or sense towards an experience and then files it away for future access and reference. This creates attachment to what you know. The practice of detachment begins by […]

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The brain has a way of trying to make sense of the new information we are exposed to. The unconscious mind tries to link every thought, sound, or sense towards an experience and then files it away for future access and reference. This creates attachment to what you know.

The practice of detachment begins by letting go of those events to create space for new opportunities in life, relationships, and business.

Nature Heals the Brain

Whether attachment is positive — towards a loved one or negative — to addiction, trauma, or negative thought. Any attachment does not allow for change. The unconscious mind does not like change. Greatness, creations, or profound thought does not come from a place of comfort; it comes from a place of pain, disruption, and reorganization.

Did you know attachment prevents you from experiencing new things and leads to suffering?

The practice of detachment is profound and is embedded in mindfulness.

Detachment is not numbing out, nor is it neutral. We are human beings and full of emotions. All emotions are essential, and feeling them fully is key; the secret is to let them move through you.

I have experienced many gurus trying to be in a state of nirvana, or so they think. You tell them your house is on fire, and they respond, “that was meant to be,” denying you of your grief, your anger, and your sadness.

I was attending a course in Florida. The teacher for lymphatic work presented in a way that was mindful and centered. During the course, a mutual friend had a tree fall on this house during a storm. I was empathic with his story shared his big energy with him; I understood. The teacher, however, became neutral and distant, giving the advice “that it was meant to be,” which really is irritating. It is easy to say it was meant to be because it happened; it certainly doesn’t help you be supportive as a human being. I was so taken back by her response as not being authentic; the frequency of her words did not match her being. I did investigate; I always like to confirm my intuitive abilities with facts. I discovered she is a total drama queen in her own life, which made me go deep in thought to share with others what mindfulness, meditation, and detachment mean.

Power of Detachment

A long time ago, I went on an all-girls trip to Vancouver. For one of the girls, it was her first time on a plane. I had been on so many since I was 15 years old that it was curious to me. We were meeting up with a friend of mine from university, and he was going to show us around. He asked me to describe each of my friends, which I did. At the end do the weekend, he shared, “you are the first female I have met that described each of your friends exactly the way they were.”

It made me realize that I can be an objective observer (detached). In that space, you can see all sides, no attachment just facts. This can often be misunderstood as judgment. I have no investment in the information, just sharing. This approach is usual for people to receive until they understand what the power of detachment can do. It opens up opportunities and choices and decreases the expectations of others.

The goal is to live fully but fully allow emotions and experiences to flow through us. Hanging onto them becomes destructive to our journey and our potential.

Experiencing life fully and allowing energy to move through you is where mindfulness and detachment begin.

Detachment creates space in the brain for ideas.

I have met so many people who interpret mindfulness, or being present, as being withdrawn. I was born with a gift of connecting with spirit and God; with this gift, there is an understanding that anger, sadness, and defiance are part of the journey.

My clients used to say to me, “are you always this peaceful?” I said no, I experience every emotion 100%.

The practice of mindfulness and detachment occurs daily; it is a journey. Similar to stretching daily, if you don’t, the muscles and fascia shorten and create pain or stiffness. The brain and the spirit are the same.

To learn more about how you can start to practice, join me for the live Mindfulness and Detachment Webinar on March 25 at 6 PM MST.

https://fasciatraininginstitute.as.me/?appointmentType=21210385

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