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Style & Fashion: A Philosophical Essay

Summary- We discuss how the changing trends in style and fashion are responsible for a never-ending dissatisfaction with realism and mundane aesthetics. You have been reading the Stylelist Kinya Claiborne far too long. The information that you have been consuming has now become an obsession. One can often find the folks of modern civilization immersed […]

Summary- We discuss how the changing trends in style and fashion are responsible for a never-ending dissatisfaction with realism and mundane aesthetics.

You have been reading the Stylelist Kinya Claiborne far too long. The information that you have been consuming has now become an obsession. One can often find the folks of modern civilization immersed deeply in contemplation over how they look, and its’ because of this information that seeps their minds.

If you come upon a certain fashion magazine Los Angeles, you will find it heavily breeding with images of human beings who can be perceived as way too genetically configured in the realm of physical aesthetics and dressed up in clothes that appear enamoured beyond their quintessential essence of serving protection to being from the physical depravities of a non-being life.

Us humans have far succeeded the constraints of primordial kind, which results in growing constraints of a very different kind i.e. one that encapsulates us into thinking where we stand on a scale described by the platonic form exhibited by a supermodel posing half-naked in the best fashion magazine in Los Angeles.

We thereby are responsible for discriminating ourselves on grounds that are induced by people very much like us but mobilised by institutions with degraded moral ethics, and virtues that stink of incoherent justifications to survive inmeaningless markets. The people are oppressed by the people, and we don’t exhibit much resistance for this autocracy takes place slowly and steadily. What one sees, one can barely see, thus we see but we refuse to see for we can simply not see. However, the important consideration to note here is that a philosopher’s inclination towards certain platonic forms is deprived of the discriminatory grounds that one may use for the purpose of putting one being over another over matters that exceed his or her capability.

That model who appears to be way too attractive than you or that celebrity living a life much grander than you. That blessed child who has a never-ending stream of fortune. These are “success” stories. And hearing such stories continuously, one may be forced to seek solace in artistic forms that exhibit alternative thought structures aligned towards a fulfilment bereft of material kind, serving as a replacement to the pre-sets of achievement. Art and materialism are two ends of this spectrum. Repeated consumption of one kind will always push the inclination of the man towards consumption of another kind. Thereby, it’s about time we end our consumption and over-consumption of such skewed ideals and set ourselves up for a life filled without metrics of judgement with anyone but ourselves, because when that happens, life will truly be an individualistic impression in an artwork constantly being pushed into oblivion by the imprints of a capitalist society.

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