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Staying connected while isolated

How do we overcome the feeling of disconnect during the pandemic?

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The world looks vastly different these days. No more kids running in the hallways at school. No more crowd chatter at restaurants, no more shaking hands with strangers. It’s a new norm but it doesn’t mean we have to stay disengaged.

5 tips on how you can combat loneliness and gain closer relationships.

1. Get connected!
Get your extended family joined together through platforms where you’re able to interact face to face. Apps like zoom or Google Duo allow you to connect with more than one person at a time, so family gatherings don’t become disconnected.

2. Through the looking glass.
If you have a family member(s) that doesn’t have the ability to use technology, still visit in person. Visiting in person allows the disconnected to still stay connected. Even though social distancing is required, a simple “hello” or “I love you” through the window is just as significant.

3. Get outside.
We are constantly on the hustle and bustle of life. You often hear people complain that they don’t have enough time to just get outside. Now is the perfect time to do just that. Exploring your neighborhood gets us off the screens and uses our imaginations. You’d be surprised what you could find in your very own backyard, or new neighbors you could meet (by waiving).

4. Try something new.
Why not foster the idea of trying something new. Maybe you have been itching to try that one activity that you just didn’t have time for before. Stretch yourself. Staying busy keeps our minds off the idea of the social isolation as something bad and keeps your focus on something good. Trying a something you’ve been interested in can foster a relationship within yourself.

5. Get moving!
Keeping your body active is so powerful for your health and mood. If you have kids or spouse, why not get the whole family involved? You don’t have to do it alone. It doesn’t have to be rigorous workout and full on sweats. But a little extra blood flowing can improve your mood and boost your endorphins.

Bottom Line: Social isolation doesn’t have to be daunting. Staying connected can be easier than we think, and keeping our minds busy helps keeps our perspective in a positive state.

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