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Sports Stars Making a Social Impact: Adam Corrigan is teaching people how to “win at failure”

In sports we will all fail at some point, its part of life, accepting it and moving on is important. I started a project called 4 Weeks 2 Failure. The idea is to do an event like a 10k, century bike ride or something like that, and only train for it for 4 weeks. It’s […]


In sports we will all fail at some point, its part of life, accepting it and moving on is important. I started a project called 4 Weeks 2 Failure. The idea is to do an event like a 10k, century bike ride or something like that, and only train for it for 4 weeks. It’s a lot of fun and you’re under the pump to get into shape. It ties in with my Athletic Reboot business where I help retired athletes get back into shape through and online training program, I then challenge them to 4 Weeks 2 Failure events and coach them in their training programs to be fit for the event. There’s a competitiveness that all athletes have, it doesn’t just switch off after you’re done competing , so this coaching program and project gives former athletes some focus and a place to channel their competitiveness while getting them in great shape.


I had the pleasure of interviewing Adam Corrigan. Adam has trained in Taekwondo for 30 years. He has represented the Australian National and Olympic team, Great Britain National and Olympic team, South African National TKD Team and Team Alpha Male — MMA Team winning numerous medals and championships.


Thank you so much for joining us! Can you share with us the “backstory” that led you to this career path?

As a young kid, my older brother and I would fight a lot, I was on the losing end of most of those battles. So, my parents took me to Taekwondo to learn self-defense. I fell in love with it from there and won a few brother battles after that.

Can you share the funniest or most interesting story that occurred to you in the course of your career?

Way too many to mention! Probably getting lost in random countries is something that’s always happened to me. I kind of enjoy wondering around places but I got lost and walked around all night in South Korea when I was 17. Eventually found my way back and when I walked into the Hotel my coach said, “Great, you’re up, lets go to training” Was a rough day!! A Shady taxi driver also dropped me off in the ghetto of Paris at the same age, it was getting dark and I was getting weird looks. The SWAT team asked me what I was doing there and told me I need to leave, or I’ll get hunted. Luckily a taxi showed up when he said that, and I got out of there. Was pretty scary!

What would you advise to a young person who wants to emulate your success?

Firstly it’s not going to be easy, you’re going to have road blocks, let downs, people that tell you you’re not good enough and a whole bunch of things that can give you an ‘out’. But you need to believe in yourself, be resilient and focus on you and what you’re trying to achieve. Also, you need to work harder than everyone else, if you do that your confidence will be top notch!

Is there a person that made a profound impact on your life? Can you share a story?

There are a few people who’ve inspired me along the way. But my Dad was almost the perfect sporting Dad, whether it was playing rugby, my other love, or fighting. He would watch, say well done after a win or a loss, then talk to me about how I could have done things different or better, this would make me think for myself. He never yelled or screamed or got angry at bad calls or decisions. He was very supportive. I think parents need to let kids play sport and just talk to them after the wins or losses and let them figure it out. If a parent gives too much info and wants his or her kid to play a certain way, then the kid is playing for the parent and they should be playing for themselves. That will also hamper a kid’s creativity they need to develop themselves.

How have you used your success to bring goodness to the world? Can you share with us the meaningful or exciting causes you are working on right now?

In sports we will all fail at some point, its part of life, accepting it and moving on is important. I started a project called 4 Weeks 2 Failure. The idea is to do an event like a 10k, century bike ride or something like that, and only train for it for 4 weeks. It’s a lot of fun and you’re under the pump to get into shape. It ties in with my Athletic Reboot business where I help retired athletes get back into shape through and online training program, I then challenge them to 4 Weeks 2 Failure events and coach them in their training programs to be fit for the event. There’s a competitiveness that all athletes have, it doesn’t just switch off after you’re done competing , so this coaching program and project gives former athletes some focus and a place to channel their competitiveness while getting them in great shape.

What methods are you using to most effectively share your cause with the world?

I use social media a lot and try put as much useful content out there to help others. I’m working with a few companies now to get all their staff into shape for the greater good of their health but also the companies health. Businesses are like sports teams, and if athletes aren’t fit then they won’t perform as well or be on their A game. As a business owner you want to know your staff are healthy and can perform their jobs with an energy that makes everyone step their game up.

Can you share with us the story behind why you chose to take up this particular cause?

I’ve always been in the fitness field. But after retiring recently from professional fighting, I was depressed, lost my confidence, got in terrible shape and was lost. I had to step up and reinvent myself as someone who can help those dealing with the same problems. So many high-profile athletes fall into depression afterwards, lose their identity and some have even committed suicide. I didn’t realize it until I was dealing with it myself. Helping others through my programs has been great and incredibly rewarding.

Can you share with us a story about a person who was impacted by your cause?

An old training partner of mine was in a bad way. Out of shape, struggling with work, depression and using substances that are usually the start of a downward spiral. I coached and trained him to be looking and feeling way better. He’s entering a fitness competition this year and things are looking good for him. These results are all I ask for, they make me happy!

What are your 3 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why? Please share a story or example for each.

I would have read more books when I was younger, I still don’t read but audio books make that a whole lot easier. I wish someone had of told me to plan years ahead and not just for my sports achievements. So, I kind of feel like my 30s are my 20s cause I was an athlete throughout my 20s so I didn’t venture out of my sports field too much. I wish someone had of told me invest in Amazon or Nike back in the day… Would be nice having a piece of those pies!!

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

My 4 Weeks 2 Failure project started in 2018 and I did most events by myself, its inspired people while I was doing it. I hope that by putting myself out there in tough situations it inspires others to do the same regardless of if they fail or not. Long term I want to have people from around the world doing a 4 Week Challenge to get them to the next level.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you explain how that was relevant in your life?

Something most fight fans will know is Rocky’s quote “Life ain’t all sunshine and rainbows” I think the whole message in that scene is pretty special. As a fighter you get knocked down from time to time, getting up is the first thing you’re trained to do. I never cared if I got beat by somebody better, but if I ever quit on myself it would be unforgivable. I think whether its fighting or just life. Never quit, no matter how low you might be. Once you quit, mentally you make it ok to quit again, once you do that you will quit again and again and again. Never do it!!

Some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Politics, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why?

He or she might just see this if we tag them 🙂 Theres so many, I love Warren Buffet, Ed Mylett, Ray Dalio I’d love to pick their brains. But someone whom I’ve gained a lot of respect for despite many being so against him is Donald Trump. Never has any President been so judged, hated and labelled as many things, from a racist to Hitler and more. But before 2016 he was a normal guy who was incredibly successful and the worst thing, he ever did was fire your favorite celebrity on the Apprentice. Everything has changed for some reason now that he is president. What I love is none of if seems to bother him and he’s trying to do the best for the US and the American people which is what his job is. I know many have mixed feelings on him, which is fine, you’re allowed to. I’m not from the US and I wasn’t allowed to vote so, its an outside perspective on how I see things. He’s been doing massive deals in NYC since his 20’s, been a millionaire and then broke, then back to a billionaire and dabbled in many different businesses with success. I think I’d learn a hell of a lot from him over lunch.

Thank you so much for these amazing insights. This was so inspiring

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