Community//

Small habits can help drive change and provide clarity in uncertain times: My story

Nobody could have predicted the events of 2020 so far, or the impact that the global pandemic has had. But one thing is for sure, the uncertainty and circumstances driven by covid-19 have taken their toll on the mental health of each and every one of us. For me, unfortunately, having dealt with the loss […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres on our open platform. We publish pieces as written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team and must meet our guidelines prior to being published.
Photo by Aleksandr Ledogorov on Unsplash
Photo by Aleksandr Ledogorov on Unsplash

Nobody could have predicted the events of 2020 so far, or the impact that the global pandemic has had. But one thing is for sure, the uncertainty and circumstances driven by covid-19 have taken their toll on the mental health of each and every one of us.

For me, unfortunately, having dealt with the loss of my second child five years ago, I have learned a number of coping techniques – actually not just coping but also surviving and thriving – that can help in difficult and uncertain times. I swear by these to help me stay focused and so I hope by sharing these I can help any of you that might be struggling on any particular day to introduce new habits to make life a little easier too:

  1. Practice gratitude

I journal daily, outlining three things that happened that day which I’m most grateful for. It could be the smile a stranger gave me whilst walking down the street, it could be my husband making me a cup of tea as soon as I get home from work, or it could be something like my son making a lovely piece of colourful art. Looking at everything you still have in life and being grateful for cherished moments takes away from focusing on the negatives.

Recently I’ve had three very close people in the family with injuries. I focus on the fact that they are receiving the best care, are in the right place for it, are being looked after, and think about moments with them. It takes away from focusing on the injuries and the impact it has on them being injured and caring for them all

2. Meditation

It’s my saviour and really helps with breathing, keeping calm, removing any anxiety and brings clarity in my mind to think things through logically and clearly. Meditation has been part of my life for the last three years almost. Start small, only 5 minutes a day is all that is needed, then you can increase as you gain focus. For me, on a good day I do 30 minutes in the morning and about 20 minutes in the evening.

3. Do the things you love most

If that’s cooking, over cook! If that’s reading, read more to, if that’s putting on your best lipstick, like I do, do it! These things make you feel good and boost your mood

.4. Reach out

There’s nothing wrong with seeking help and there’s a plethora of information and resources online to help with links to follow through on for support services. Reaching out also means taking up the opportunity from a friend for a coffee or a chat.

5. Exercise

For me that’s walking but any form of exercise is great. I find walking with a really good podcast to listen to is the motivation I need to get going. It sets me up with the excitement to do it, and I can carry on walking for longer. It really helps to have fresh air circulation around the body, uplifting your mood and I always feel more alert and energised from it. 

6.Emotions

Don’t suppress them. When I was experiencing grief in the early days, I wrote out my emotions, and it really helped release a lot in me. As time goes on, I openly talked about grief, that again helps me. I’ve also written a letter to the person I was grieving for. It helped release a lot and give me closure with so much more. 

Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

Photo by Natalia Figueredo on Unsplash
Community//

The silver lining isn’t in the clouds, it’s WITHIN YOU

by Jeannette Paulino
Community//

7 Resiliency Skills I’ve Learned Through Healing Grief

by Karla Kueber
Community//

Flipping the Script: How I Molded Tragedy Into Triumph

by Kimberly Tronic

Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

Thrive Global
People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.