Community//

Sloane Siegel: “Don’t worry so much”

Don’t worry so much You’re not going to get feedback right away usually, or most of the time at all. You just have to do an audition and forget about it. Otherwise you’ll just dwell on everything and it will distract you during future opportunities. So, don’t worry. So, do your best every time, know that […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres on our open platform. We publish pieces as written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team and must meet our guidelines prior to being published.

Don’t worry so much

You’re not going to get feedback right away usually, or most of the time at all. You just have to do an audition and forget about it. Otherwise you’ll just dwell on everything and it will distract you during future opportunities. So, don’t worry. So, do your best every time, know that you did, and move on.

Enjoy the process.

I would be so stressed about what I was going to do next, that I didn’t focus on what was happening then. By the time I started working on a role I was worrying about what I was going to do next. And there are so many instances and experiences that I wish I was more present for, so I could remember and enjoy them accordingly. So, when you’re working, just work. Just focus on what you’re doing and enjoy every minute of it. Because once a moment is over, it is only a memory. While memories are great, they’re never as potent as the real thing.


As a part of our series about pop culture’s rising stars, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Sloane Siegel.

Award-winning actor Sloane Siegel is no stranger to being number one on the call sheet. He got his first taste at leading a cast playing the title character in “Gortimer Gibbon’s Life on Normal Street.” That experience helped prepare him for his latest project, Dwight in Shining Armor, airing exclusively on BYUtv. Now in its fifth season, the family-friendly series follows the adventures of everyday teenager Dwight whose life is transformed after falling into an underground chamber and must figure out how to be the champion that warrior princess Gretta needs.


Thank you so much for joining us in this interview series! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

Well, hello, I’m Sloane. I was born in Washington D.C. in the year 2000. I was raised on a rescue farm in Martinsburg, West Virginia and also spent a lot of time in D.C. and Baltimore. On the farm, we took care of a multitude of animals we rescued from all over. A lot came in and out, but the family consisted of 16 horses, two goats, two donkeys, three cats, six BIG dogs, two rabbits, and a bull named Moomi. I was just a normal kid doing normal kid stuff. I loved space and the ocean. I usually read encyclopedias instead of stories. Which is funny considering the job I ended up in. I was always a bit outgoing and talkative. They say don’t talk to strangers, but little me was determined to make everybody my friend. I did soccer, gymnastics, ice skating, hip-hop, and various other activities until I started acting in theater. That’s when my life started to take a very different path, taking me from the comforts of the East Coast to the unknown West. Of course there are countless triumphs, stories and tragedies in between, but there are only so many words I can put onto a page. I’m just very thankful that I was surrounded by so many kind people growing up.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

I had a lot of energy and a lot of emotion growing up that I didn’t really know how to deal with. When I found acting, all of that passion I had, finally had a focus. So, when I was 8, I started theater and around 10 my life changed. My mom heard something on the radio that should’ve been a scam. It was an ad for an acting school a few hours away. (Since we lived so far from anything.) We took the chance so that I could have a better shot at understanding this new focus. Turns out it was for real. I auditioned and got a scholarship to my first acting classes. It just felt right. Telling stories and acting out scenarios, I could be anybody. It was thrilling and interesting and I just wanted to do it more. One thing leads to another and you find yourself traveling across the country and chasing a dream that will become your life. So, now I just want to do what I love and make a positive impact while doing so.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

Night 1 of my official career, I had just flown into LA for the first time. It was late, especially for a 10-year-old. My dad and I heard there was this relatively well-known actor doing a “Workshop.” Turns out it was just him standing front of a bunch of people and ranting. After it was over and everyone was leaving, I approached him and asked him a question. I said, “Excuse me sir, what advice can you offer me as an actor just starting out?” He took a second and then looked into my hopeful young eyes and said, “go home.” I was stunned. He couldn’t really have meant for me to go home, I just got here. I said, Go home?” He said, “Yes, go home. You’re wasting your time. You’ll never be anything.” Then stormed off. My dad and I were very discouraged and then went to our apartment we had rented for the duration of pilot season. Joke’s on him though, because I booked my first job two hours later that night and became SAG eligible the next day. Moral? It was going to be a lot more difficult of a journey than I had ever anticipated. I was young though, I’d work for many years before his warning really had weight in my life. As I got older, things got tougher and I considered quitting a few major times. His words rang in my ear from time to time. But, I kept going. Whether he meant to help me or not, he gave me my first dose of Hollywood rejection. It’s a bountiful weed here. But, it’s toughened me up. And every time I lose, I get back up stronger, because I Iove what I do.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

When I first moved to LA, I stayed at the Oakwood Apartments. I learned to never go there again. If you know, you know.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I just completed the 5th and final season of my show “Dwight in Shining Armor.” We filmed all 10 episodes in the latter half of 2020, filming in Covid conditions was difficult, but we succeeded without a single positive case. That season will begin airing March 21st of this year. I’m also currently working on the video game, Gotham Knights as Tim Drake, Robin. Which is a dream come true. Never thought I’d play a superhero, let alone the boy wonder.

You have been blessed with success in a career path that can be challenging. Do you have any words of advice for others who may want to embark on this career path, but seem daunted by the prospect of failure?

Well if you’re daunted by the prospect of failure, then you’re already setting yourself up for failure. You have to be accepting of failure, because it will happen again and again. I was told once you do 80 auditions before you get a callback and 80 more callbacks before you book something. Obviously imaginary numbers, but the phrase gives you a realistic expectation of this industry. It’s incredibly hard to succeed and if you’re not used to it, you could perceive every missed opportunity as failure. That can wear you down. In reality, everything you don’t get, just makes you stronger for the things you will get. Some people go years without getting anything and then get the role of their lives and some people became an immediate success and then never book again. It’s challenging and intimidating because there is no trend or predictability, it’s all about being right place, right time, right work ethic, right training, and right moment, for the right role, just to get you started. So, you have to overcome your fear of failure and not only that, but use it to make you stronger. If you stop loving it, stop doing it. I strongly believe anyone can do anything they put their mind to if they’re determined enough. Dreams don’t just come true you have to make them happen. So, if you want to embark on the career path of acting, just know it’s a tough one. Work hard, love what you do, don’t let the failure get to you, and then nothing can stop you.

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

Well number 1: I think it should just be a standard necessity. It’s a tragedy that it has been an ongoing battle for representation and diversity in the entertainment industry for so long. It shouldn’t be up for debate. It should just be. Luckily, there is more diversity and representation than ever and while that’s good, there is much more work to be done to make sure everyone’s voice is heard. Do one or two groups of people represent everyone in the world? Absolutely not. There are so many perspectives and stories that need to be told, which brings me to reason number two.

Number 2: There are countless, thrilling, emotional, hilarious, captivating, moving, inspiring stories that have not been told. And they can only BE told through a diverse perspective. You see issues with whitewashing In Hollywood all the time. But, I don’t think the issue stops there. I don’t think it’s just the actors that should be diverse, I think it’s the stories. I think a spotlight deserves to be put on people who have not had their story told yet, or properly at all. While, there are some great stories out there already, I think the stock of them should only increase. Example. Disney’s Moana shines a much needed light on traditional Polynesian culture, but how many other films or television series can you name that do the same? Or with better, more realistic accuracy? While it’s a heartfelt family film, what about a film rooted in the conflicts someone of that culture experiences? Wouldn’t that give them something to relate to? Which brings me to reason number 3.

Number 3: Why do we entertain? Why do we make films and TV series? For enjoyment. For escape. But, I think the most important thing is understanding or relatability. We look to film and TV for how to laugh, how to grieve, how to be angry, how to forgive and so forth. It is a universal guidebook to being a human being. It is our interpretation of what is to be alive and experience the things we do. Without representation and diversity how are we to achieve that third goal? Anyone can enjoy a superhero movie. Anyone can escape with a fantasy film. But, I don’t think everyone feels understood by the same things. That’s why it’s important for everyone to tell their story. For understanding of yourself and others. If you can’t see your reflection on that screen, you can be left feeling isolated and alone in the grand social structure. I don’t want to leave anyone feeling isolated. Diverse stories need to be told, so that people of those cultures and identities feel understood and empowered to be proud of who they are.

I think with an abundance of diversity and representation, our current collective culture can feel less like a struggle for acknowledgment and empowerment and more like an efficient, interconnected, respectful collective of individuality.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” And why. Please share a story or example for each.

1. Everything is subject to change.

When I worked on my first series as a co-star I didn’t want to mess up. I studied my lines and forged my beats and then on the day, the director threw the whole script out and changed everything. I was certainly not expecting that. This happens all the time in the industry. You have to be malleable and prepared for anything.

2. Not everyone has your best interests.

This industry can be quite cutthroat. I’ve always seen auditions as: “If I get it awesome, if you get it fantastic, if we get it, it’s a miracle, and if neither of us get it, there’s always the next one.” But, not everyone sees it that way. Some people can be very competitive, cruel, and mal-intentioned. I was very naïve to this notion when I first started and I trusted people that used me, and kept me as a close friend only to dump me when it suited them. So, just watch out for those types of people. And find a true support group of friends that are genuine, as I have now.

3. Don’t wear a vest to auditions

No story here. I used to wear a vest to every audition. Turns out I didn’t have to. Silly me. No more vests, yay.

4. Don’t worry so much

You’re not going to get feedback right away usually, or most of the time at all. You just have to do an audition and forget about it. Otherwise you’ll just dwell on everything and it will distract you during future opportunities. So, don’t worry. So, do your best every time, know that you did, and move on.

5. Enjoy the process.

I would be so stressed about what I was going to do next, that I didn’t focus on what was happening then. By the time I started working on a role I was worrying about what I was going to do next. And there are so many instances and experiences that I wish I was more present for, so I could remember and enjoy them accordingly. So, when you’re working, just work. Just focus on what you’re doing and enjoy every minute of it. Because once a moment is over, it is only a memory. While memories are great, they’re never as potent as the real thing.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them thrive and not “Burn out”?

When you stop loving it, stop doing it. You don’t want to turn sour towards your own ambitions. Don’t turn your dream into a nightmare by overworking yourself and driving yourself mad. You only “burn out”, if you begin to resent your journey.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea could trigger.

I have a saying that I made up in hopes of spreading love and positivity. I tell it to everyone I can in hopes of spreading joy. “If each person in the world made one person smile a day, then everybody in the world would be smiling.” So I with that, I hope to spread a movement of global kindness.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you where you are? Can you share a story about that?

Everyone I’ve encountered has played a part in getting me where I am. I’m grateful to everyone that has made my path delightful to follow. Everyone from friends, to peers, to crew, and people I meet passing by. Of course if there are particular people I owe the most to, it is my parents. My mom and dad changed their lives for me to follow a dream that became a life. They’ve always been my biggest supporters and inspirations. I’m truly thankful to have parents that gave everything up for me to achieve something. And I strive every day to make their sacrifices and support worth it.

Can you give us your favorite “Life lesson quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

My dad came up with a quote, or you know, says he did. Dads tend to do that. But, I’m pretty sure it’s his. He always told me that “Normal is just a setting on a dryer.” I’ve always been different. I’ve always seen the world differently and I’ve never been considered normal. I’m dorky and weird, sometimes awkward. But, none of that matters because normal is just a setting on a dryer. Why would I want to be like everybody else, when I can just be like me? So, I am unapologetically myself at all times. And I encourage others to embrace their true selves, no matter how abnormal they may be considered. Because once again, “Normal is just a setting on a dryer.”

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them.

Shockingly enough, Mike Posner. I don’t know if you are aware of his journey the last few years. But, I admire his progress as a person tremendously. He has been through a lot, and decided to better himself as a result. He spreads a good message of self-love and creates some pretty amazing art. I think “A Real Good Kid” Is a masterpiece. Truly, one of my favorite albums ever conceived. It would be a pleasure to sit down with him, enjoy a meal, and share philosophies.

How can our readers follow you online?

@sloanesiegel on everything.

“Dwight in Shining Armor” season 5 premieres March 21st at 8:30/7:30c on BYUtv. Stream the show online at Byutv.org.

BYUtv has more than two million YouTube subscribers and two billion views and is available live and on-demand on multiple digital platforms free of charge, including Apple TV, YouTube, Roku, Amazon Fire, Chromecast, Xbox One, Windows Media, digital apps for iOS and Android, and BYUtv.org.

This was very meaningful, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!


    Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

    You might also like...

    Courtesy of Ivelin Radkov / Shutterstock
    Wisdom//

    This Is Why 80% of Your Work Is a Waste of Time (And What to Do About It)

    by Matt Sandrini
    Wisdom//

    How To Cure Your Sunday Blues

    by Heather Gray
    Community//

    Living Carefree

    by Lisa Clark
    We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.