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Setting Boundaries at Work While Working from Home

It’s been almost a year since the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted our world. Many white collar employees were forced to work remotely, some of the very first time. Working from home can feeling like a trap for many people because we can’t escape our environment like we used to working in an office. While working in […]

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It’s been almost a year since the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted our world. Many white collar employees were forced to work remotely, some of the very first time. Working from home can feeling like a trap for many people because we can’t escape our environment like we used to working in an office. While working in an office, you can hit a switch and check out after 5:00 PM while also physically leaving. Not so much while working from home.

I personally have been working from home for 4 years and I’ve picked up some great tips to ward off some of the negative feelings of working from home exclusively. Let’s go through some of those:

Set a Start Time and End Time

While working from home, work can creep up on that personal space we all need so dearly. Phones going off, computers dinging with new emails, and bosses or clients expecting to be able to reach you at any hour of the day. It’s important to establish a start time and end time to your work day.

Let Others Know Your Work Hours

Equally important is to let others know your work hours and that you won’t be checking your phone or email before or after those hours. That sounds pretty tough but you owe it to yourself mentally to have “me” time.

Go For a Walk

I like to go for a walk right after work to get the sense of breaking up my work schedule and personal life. Not only that but going for a walk can really improve your mental health after a tough day.

Schedule Events Outside Your Home If Possible

Depending on where you live, this one may be tough. In North Carolina, plenty of things are open. It’s important to get out of your home each day and see a change of scenery. For some, a park could do the trick. For others, supporting a small business or restaurant will provide a new environment

Talk to People

My final tip is to talk to someone if you’re struggling. Friends and family are go-to’s but sometimes we need a professional to speak with. There are plenty of places to find a therapist that can help, including a therapist directory or by searching on Google for a therapist near you.

In Conclusion

In the 4 years I’ve worked from home, it has been tough. I do miss having support from teammates and managers. It can be lonely sometimes. But there are people who care about you and ways you can minimize the anxiety and exhaustion working from home can cause. I thank you for reading my post.

My name is Anthony Bart, I’m the owner of BartX Digital. We operate TherapistX, and Therapybypro. I’ve been an entrepreneur since 2017. I’m a huge mental health advocate and care about people.

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