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Sere: “I have none, I have no regrets, I am not that kind of person”

Growing up I figured out that I am curious about human nature and emotions realising that artistic expression is not a comfort zone but a life purpose: I wanted to explore and experience more. Art is a realm where you can experience a variety of emotions without causing “trouble” in real life. Through art, you […]

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Growing up I figured out that I am curious about human nature and emotions realising that artistic expression is not a comfort zone but a life purpose: I wanted to explore and experience more. Art is a realm where you can experience a variety of emotions without causing “trouble” in real life. Through art, you can ‘’ commit a crime’’ without hurting anybody, including yourself.

Being able to do that is freeing and healing. If someone can go through this healing process, they can become inspiration for others too. I can’t think of a more suitable profession.


As a part of our series about rising music stars, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing SEREL.

Diving into Serel’s music is an emotional experience where inner feelings blossom into honest lyrics.

Growing up in Turkey, Serel was exposed to a diverse source of musical influence: in a house steeped in the devotion of the mystique of Sufi music, her inquisitive nature was influenced by artists spanning multiple genres; The Doors, Pink Floyd, Nirvana, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Edith Piaf and Queen.

The premature loss of her father signaled the beginning of a nomadic period.

At 17 she moved to Istanbul in search of belonging and artistic direction: an acting role in a television series brought public interest but it also further stretched her fragilities.

To reconnect with her true creative freedom, Serel left everything behind. During her healing journey, made of self-discovery and introspection, she learned how to find beauty in extreme darkness.

After moving from place to place, Serel settled in the UK, where she uncovered her voice and bonded with producer Adam Rust and songwriter Jimmy Kent.

Roots are the place we belong, musically, they are the tonal centre, the perfect harmony. In London, Serel found both.

Serel released her debut single ‘Daddy’s Gone’ in January 2021, a blend of powerful vocals and unfiltered emotions. This is a raw, unpredictable and irrational song: Serel wants to remind people that strength isn’t measured by a hardened exterior or a feeling of invincibility.

Real strength is accepting that whatever happens you will never give up.


Thank you so much for joining us in this interview series! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

Thank you so much for having me.

I feel like I grew up in paradise: I was born in Izmir which is known as the most liberal city of Turkey.

My father was a sportsman, my mother is an English teacher; they gave me limitless and unconditional love alongside my grandparents and my uncle. I always felt their love no matter what I did.

I made a lot of ‘mistakes’ because I felt free to explore my nature; my family has always been open minded but they became even more flexible to cope with the creative trouble-making (but well-intentioned) child that I was.

My father introduced me to a variety of sports: from surfing to ice skating and horse riding

My mother has more of an “intellectual” influence on me exposing me to Shakespeare’s poems.

I grew up surrounded by friends that could afford everything they dreamed of and while my bohemian family has never been particularly financially stable, I never felt inadequate. Being the poorest amongst my friends made me develop a peculiar sense of humour and freedom.

I remember feeling like my life was too good to be true, unconsciously expecting a problem; my inner fear became reality when my father passed.

It crashed my fairy-tale life and forced me to build a new reality, a larger one, in the real world.

That’s why I choose to release ‘Daddy’s Gone’ as my debut single.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

I was always encouraged to be “on stage” by a family member or by a friend; being in the spotlight became my comfort zone. I couldn’t think of a deeper sense of belonging than being on stage. I often acted as if I was on an imaginary stage and that’s how I had fun.

Growing up I figured out that I am curious about human nature and emotions realising that artistic expression is not a comfort zone but a life purpose: I wanted to explore and experience more. Art is a realm where you can experience a variety of emotions without causing “trouble” in real life. Through art, you can ‘’ commit a crime’’ without hurting anybody, including yourself.

Being able to do that is freeing and healing. If someone can go through this healing process, they can become inspiration for others too. I can’t think of a more suitable profession.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

I have been relying on an imaginary “business plan” I made when I was a child, it was my spiritual business plan. The rules are purely spiritual ones, I haven’t been obeying anything else.

During my unstructured career path, I would say that the most interesting story is related to how I met Emanuele, my manager.

Over 3 years ago, I wrote a fictional short story about me finding out that my therapist was writing a book about my life: my imaginary character playing the therapist was named “Anne”.

In June 2020 I was sick and tired of not getting along with any manager and in search of artistic support I had to find the right person. My childhood friend Melis, the daughter of my father’s best friend had just lost her boyfriend at the age of 27 and was seeing a medium called Anne.

When Melis described Anne I immediately felt like this is my ‘Anne’ she must be the right person.

I arranged a zoom session setting up my intention: I was looking for an answer to solve my manager issue. At the 15th minute of our session, Anne said: “Serel, there is a guy named Emanuele, you should speak with him, I am not sure what he does but he will help you”.

The very next day I was in Emanuele’s office; I knew it was meant to be. We’ve been working hard together since then and 8 months later we’ve released my debut single and recorded more to be released shortly. My manager and I were unconventionally connected when both of us were looking for the same thing at the same time.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

I always had a problem making jokes at places where they wouldn’t be funny. I got into a lot of trouble with the media because of that so I learnt to keep my dark humour to myself and to my close friends.

When I was shooting a TV series in Turkey I broke my arm while on a bike and despite the pain I started laughing. Over the following 6 episodes I had to work with a broken arm but never moaned about it.

During an interview I said to the interviewer: ‘even breaking my arm doesn’t hurt baby’ as a joke.

The press took it super seriously, making me look like a maniac who thinks of herself as a supernatural. I recall my grandfather reading the newspaper in the morning and asking me: “Serel, what did you try to say here darling?” I learnt that sometimes I have to manage the urge of entertaining myself in serious situations, if I want to be taken seriously. My sense of humour can be used against me.

I need to become a bit more serious about my sense of humour!

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I have been lucky enough to work with a team that provides me with the artistic freedom to turn my life stories into art. Every single project I am working on right now is pretty exciting. I want my sound and my image to be real: we are working on many music and cinematic ideas.

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

Media has an immense power to carve people’s ideas. Your own idea about the world determines your idea about yourself, and vice versa. To form an opinion about the outside world people unconsciously rely on the media.

What happens when you see stereotypes in the media? If you are not represented by these stereotypes, you can feel excluded. You don’t feel as relevant, you start feeling lonely and this emotional state drains your energy.

To feel accepted, you feel the urge to be liked, therefore you try to modify your identity into something you’re not. The other option is to accept your “defeat”, convincing yourself that you are not ‘’ as powerful ‘’. If you fit into these stereotypes, you start to feel you are powerful because you are like them. But this also takes your true power away because it is not based on your honest inner self.

Having diversity in the film and television industry does allow everyone to find something they genuinely resonate with. To some it is a reminder that they are also part of the story, that they are included. Diversity might scare whoever bases its beliefs on fake consensus feelings of power.

Humankind is powerful; having diversity represented is just giving you the chance to have a real idea about your own species; you should not run away from that. I am glad to observe a “getting real” wave forming amongst the new generation.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

I have none, I have no regrets, I am not that kind of person. I am glad nobody told me back then what I know now. Instead of relying on someone describing to me how life works I would rather have a conversation with life directly.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

One day I saw an advert on the London underground showing a large image of an aubergine: I told myself “I am a sneezing, breathing, pissing creature; I am no more relevant than this fruit.”

We all need to repeat this “mantra” to ourselves on a daily basis and never forget why we started in the first place. Always have a circle of people you care about around.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I feel the magic of life is under-rated and we tend to forget how crazy existence is.

Sometimes I look at the sea, at the grass or the sky to be amazed by how surreal reality looks.

I’d love to inspire a feeling of forgetting what we think we know to surrender to what we are made of, without second thoughts. I believe human nature is far more magical than we are aware of.

I would love to trigger a feeling of excitement to make you want to surrender to your nature, to the unknown. Letting go of what you think you know, and feeling excited by not knowing. I am pretty good at that, sometimes it creates little miracles.

I believe bigger miracles could happen if more people felt that way.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

Every day I’m receiving help from different people; it would be hard to simply name a specific person but I can say that I am grateful for the kindness in the human heart. For over 7 years I have been on the move, without a particular personal space; sometimes when travelling I would put up a story on Instagram just asking “Is there anyone around Rome that has a place for me tonight?” That way I would find somewhere that I could crash.

This is how I “collected” friends that are very different to one another. For many years I trusted people I didn’t know, I never ran into a bad one. I am very grateful for every single heart that crossed my path, it has made me adore the potential of humanity.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

It should be this by Gandhi. ‘ Whatever you do will be insignificant but it’s important that you do it.’ I believe this is a quote that gives you a feeling of the macro and the micro universe at the same time. It makes you feel relieved and responsible at the same time.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

Wow, I don’t know. There are so many but I would probably say… the Queen of course!! Queen B. Beyoncé. The best entertainer out there: a living legend.

How can our readers follow you online?

Definitely on my Instagram

I have recently joined Twitter and TikTok, you can also pop by my Facebook Page

Instagram https://www.instagram.com/sserelyereli

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/c/SerelMusic

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/officialserel

Twitter https://twitter.com/officialserel

TikTok https://www.tiktok.com/@serelofficial

Thank you so much for having me

This was very meaningful, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!


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