Self Care As The Seasonal Blues Approach

Throughout the transition from the bright rays of summer sunshine to the fall and winter, we can lose ourselves in the shuffle. The blues that come along with the seasonal changes are impossible to ignore for many of us. They signal the end of a warm summer and the beginning of the approaching bitter cold […]

Thrive invites voices from many spheres to share their perspectives on our Community platform. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team, and opinions expressed by Community contributors do not reflect the opinions of Thrive or its employees. More information on our Community guidelines is available here.

Throughout the transition from the bright rays of summer sunshine to the fall and winter, we can lose ourselves in the shuffle. The blues that come along with the seasonal changes are impossible to ignore for many of us. They signal the end of a warm summer and the beginning of the approaching bitter cold that makes us all want to hibernate. There is no one way that this can present, but some of the common complaints are a loss of interest in activities and feeling more tired than usual during the change of seasons. But can we change the negative thoughts circling around us to a positive outlook?  

There is no such thing as hopelessness when dealing with the seasonal blues. We can all make changes in our daily lives to reinvigorate us and subsequently improve our point of view. Positivity doesn’t always come naturally, but it’s important to find ours amidst the drastic changes we see around us – for our own good.  If we are looking for ways to alter our negative mindset, we are actively making the choice to lift ourselves up.

If you wish to read more about my work, please visit my website Amra and Elma, influencer agency Los Angeles and influencer marketing agency or follow my Instagram.

  1. We can make the conscious choice to change our thought processes. The thought chains that lead toward the seasonal blues can be altered or broken entirely. We don’t have to be a victim to our minds when we acknowledge what is happening in our minds and strategize how to rehabilitate it. Instead of allowing ourselves to focus on the gloom, we can look forward to the beauty of the coming season and its contribution to the cycle of life. Rarely can you not find beauty when you’re looking closely enough.
  1. Talking about changing our thinking, we have to be doing self-check-ins for our emotional state. The number one person we need to keep tabs on is ourselves. If we’re not doing the work at home, how can we expect it to manifest outwardly? The journey starts with us and no one else. We must take stock of our needs and concerns. If we don’t, we will never be able to break past the seasonal blues that can drain us.
  1. The simplest defense against the seasonal blues is to catch rays of sunlight whenever possible. It has been shown that the main source of losing our positive outlook during fall and winter is often caused by a lack of access to the sunshine that is vital to us. Sunlight is important not just for our physical well-being but also for our mental. Whenever possible, we should be getting outside and enjoying the nice weather when it graces us with its presence.

4. One proven method of combating the seasonal blues, or any emotional drainage, is to keep a thought journal. In it, we can document every good thing we encounter on a given day. Life doesn’t drastically have a downfall when the heat of summer leaves us and the bite of fall or winter approaches. Chances are we’ll see similar positives to any other season. When we keep a record of the good, it reminds us of the blessings we do have that don’t change with the seasons.

We may be unable to control the change of seasons, but we can control how we respond to it. We have to turn our attention to the positives when the outside world becomes colder and darker. If we keep ourselves accountable for our individual happiness, we are already battling the seasonal blues one day at a time, which is all we can ask of ourselves.

    You might also like...

    Community//

    Love Your “Flaws”

    by Mike Robbins
    Maskot/ Getty Images
    Well-Being//

    How to Stop a Spiral of Negative Thinking In Its Tracks

    by Rebecca Muller
    Community//

    How To Make Real And Lasting Improvements In Your Eating And Exercise

    by Kathy Caprino
    We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.