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Sara Simackova of ‘Pure stuff’: “Do your homework”

What surprised me in the beginning was that in the meetings as a young woman they did not take me seriously. With all questions they turn to older men colleagues in our team. I learned that I can use it as an advantage, because they have no expectations from me. Then I can carefully listen […]

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What surprised me in the beginning was that in the meetings as a young woman they did not take me seriously. With all questions they turn to older men colleagues in our team. I learned that I can use it as an advantage, because they have no expectations from me. Then I can carefully listen and build my strategy for the client’s needs. They are all surprised in the end that it is me behind the work.


As a part of our series called “My Life as a TwentySomething Founder”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Sara Simackova.

Mentor, agency co-founder, marketing manager and commercial producer Sara Simackova, is a force to be reckoned with in the world of marketing. Just two years ago, she started a successful Pure stuff studio based in Prague focusing on authentic branding. Currently she moved to Berlin to expand her company in Europe.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! What is your “backstory”?

Since a young age I have been fascinated by business. I started to work during my highschool years as a volunteer for newspapers and lifestyle magazines as a journalist and photographer. I did everything I wanted — organising creative workshops for young people (DJ workshops included), starting a music club in my home town, learning about marketing in fashion e-commerce, working in three different countries around Europe or setting up influencer strategies for american tech start-ups. In fact, I love doing things I’ve never done before. It keeps me motivated and energised to keep on going.

Can you share the funniest or most interesting story that happened to you since you started your company? What lessons or takeaways idd you take out of that story?

I guess the funny story is our latest autumn campaign for hemp apparel Bohempia. I came from Berlin straight to the studio in Prague and spent two day of preparation for a one day photoshoot. In one day I planned to make a whole campaign with lifestyle and product photos — models, kids and even animals included. After the whole photoshoot I drove home late in the night very happy about the results. My last stop before home was farm to return a rabbit from a set. My friend owning the farm told me: “Sara, you look very very bad. Please, message me when you will arrive home.” I remember I felt offended by this. Next morning I ended up in a hospital completely exhausted. That was my lesson learned. Even if you love to work, you should listen to your body first.

What do you think makes your company stand out? Can you share a story?

Honesty. We focus on authentic branding. Stories behind products or services are what we want to tell. We are not doing paid marketing, sales or any special offers.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story?

All females around me are my supportive net. It is great to have someone to talk to and especially when they are in the same business and know what I am talking about. That is why I have started recently to mentor younger female marketers to help them along the same way as some females helped me on my journey.

Are you working on any exciting projects now?

We are very happy to be preparing a campaign for Amnesty International about migration. Also the next exciting part is expanding in german market.

How have you used your success to bring goodness to the world?

As a studio we do one campaign per year for non profit companies. I do mentoring for female marketers and a business accelerator. I do marketing strategy for Czech women lobby and volunteer for ngo that helps to bring more female speakers in discussion and on stage in European Union.

Do you have a favorite book that made a deep impact on your life? Can you share a story?

Book that I learned most is Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman. The book is about how we should change our behavior from the age we were barely surviving and our perception works on immediate reaction “fight to fight ‘’ to the mind of self-awareness. We can control our behaviour (especially anger) and learn how to react in more smart ways.

Can you share 5 of the most difficult and most rewarding parts of being a “TwentySomething founder”. Please share an example or story for each

Even though we had an investor offer in the beginning with my business partner we decided to pull it down because we wanted to be in complete control of our studio. Many startups have the first goal to do the best pitch and find investors. In my opinion it is important to go back to a business plan and ask yourself: Do I really need external financial support? Our first vision for the studio was huge factory space with whole equipment and setting. After lots of discussions we decided on a small minimalistic studio in the city center which we can afford. We are not wasting our money and providing values instead of showing how rich our company is.

What surprised me in the beginning was that in the meetings as a young woman they did not take me seriously. With all questions they turn to older men colleagues in our team. I learned that I can use it as an advantage, because they have no expectations from me. Then I can carefully listen and build my strategy for the client’s needs. They are all surprised in the end that it is me behind the work.

When people meet me they expect me to be rich, famous and partying all the time. Instead I am mostly lonely working in the late hours and during weekends, but because it is meaningful for me to change the face of the industry I do not want to do anything else in the world.

The amazing part of being an entrepreneur for me is meeting people who have a vision. It gives me the energy to wake up every day and do my work the best that I can do.

Being young has the advantage that I can truly understand my generation of millennials. Also I am not afraid to ask questions, be direct and not pretend I am 100% perfect. Media talk mostly about the downsides and problems that our generation has, but as a life optimist I believe there are many new good values that came with my generation.

What are the main takeaways that you would advise a twenty year old who is looking to found a business?

Do your homework. Prepare business plan, financial budget, road map. Start slowly step by step. Trust your gut. Sign to a mentoring program. Learn more about finances. Asked questions. Be sure you have a proper plan.

We are very blessed that some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might see this. 🙂

It is hard to pick one but I think breakfast with Tala founder Grace Beverly will be great. She is 27 years old and owning 3 companies. Now she is writing a book. I love her style and the way she communicates.

What is the best way our readers can follow you on social media?

You can add me on LinkedIn or on my Instagram saraksimackova.

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

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