Royce King of Your Startup Coach: “Discipline”

Discipline: it can be easy to allow the highs and lows of emotion to detour you. But discipline is doing what it takes, whether you are down and don’t feel like it or celebrating a win and feel you deserve the day off. As part of our interview series called “5 Things I Wish Someone Told […]

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Discipline: it can be easy to allow the highs and lows of emotion to detour you. But discipline is doing what it takes, whether you are down and don’t feel like it or celebrating a win and feel you deserve the day off.


As part of our interview series called “5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Became A Founder”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Royce King.

One of the essential ingredients to small business and startup success is experience. Over the past 20 years, Royce Gomez has founded over 12 startups and experienced the highs and lows of becoming an entrepreneur. Her knowledge and love for the startup world have made Royce a go-to business coach for founders looking to accelerate their success. She has worked with the SBDC, Founder Institute, and other organizations to deliver workshops that help businesses grow. In addition, she has published several books and is a Direct Certified Copywriter and Story Brand Guide.


Thank you so much for joining us in this interview series! Can you tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

As an entrepreneur, I began volunteering with MBA students, Startup Weekends, and business plan competitions. It excited me to be around this creative energy and encourage other entrepreneurial-minded people.

I found my passion in 2012 when I began developing marketing strategies and writing content for friends as a hobby. By 2014, I made it my full-time business, and by 2016 it went global. While it’s taken some iterations and evolved as I’ve defined more about what I enjoy doing and who I enjoy serving, the foundation has been the same.

Can you tell us a story about the hard times that you faced when you first started your journey?

Being an entrepreneur isn’t easy, and there were several days I woke up wondering, “is it worth it?” I’ve lost everything twice and had to start over; that takes resilience and self-confidence. Also, I had so many interests, and I tried being a jack of all trades and keeping my market broad. That hurt! I wasted time and money.

Where did you get the drive to continue even though things were so hard?

I couldn’t imagine working for someone else. But there was no plan B! And, I had trusted friends and mentors I could call when I needed encouragement.

So, how are things going today? How did grit and resilience lead to your eventual success?

Within two years of starting over, I had a global business. Today, I receive 1–3 requests per month to appear before a national or worldwide audience and teach. I am blessed and glad that I pressed forward through the hard times.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Then, can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

Who doesn’t make mistakes when they start?! I still make mistakes. I had a luxury realtor hire me for a big assignment — my most extensive ever. Because I was so excited and didn’t want to lose it, I underpriced it. I did get the project, and he became a returning client; but, I left a lot of money on the table.

What do you think makes your company stand out? Can you share a story?

I’ve been fortunate to have a wide range of experience and education that gives me a wide lens to help my clients see their roadblocks. The variety also keeps me creative when writing content. Additionally, I’m a self-made, 6-figure female founder.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them thrive and not “burn out”?

Self-care! Being an entrepreneur can consume you. Losing your health means you won’t enjoy the rewards.

None of us can achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story?

I was mentoring quite a few startups one year, and a friend who observed me told me I was effective. However, she asked why I didn’t start a business. In resisting what she said, I feel I found my calling and can use my skills today. Her prodding was a pivotal moment in me starting my business.

How have you used your success to bring goodness to the world?

Every year I donate hundreds of hours to serving struggling or aspiring entrepreneurs who need mentorship.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me before I started leading my company,” and why? Please share a story or example for each.

Resilience: knowing how to bounce back and rebuild after two complete losses is showing strength.

Integrity: Always doing the right thing no matter how hard it is or how it adversely affects me pays dividends.

Self-Confidence: being confident that I have the talent, grit, and determination to rebuild after two complete losses not only shows confidence but builds confidence.

An attitude of gratitude: waking up each morning and listing things I am thankful for reminds me that I am blessed.

Discipline: it can be easy to allow the highs and lows of emotion to detour you. But discipline is doing what it takes, whether you are down and don’t feel like it or celebrating a win and feel you deserve the day off.

Can you share a few ideas or stories from your experience about how to successfully ride the emotional highs & lows of being a founder”?

Remember that emotions are fluid, decisions aren’t. When you are weary, disheartened, or any other “negative” emotion, remember that you’ll soon experience happy emotions. Just keep going.

You are a person of significant influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most good to the most people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

Wow, this is a question that deserves a more extended conversation. I’d like to teach our next generation (high schoolers and college kids) two things: a great work ethic and financial literacy. If they have those two things, I believe the sky is the limit. My heart is with our youth.

How can our readers further follow your work online?

www.YourStartup.Coach

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

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