//

Rising Star Pamela Perrine: “I’d like to start a movement to change and soften hearts of others, so people don’t even hesitate to be kind to others”

My catch-phrase that I created, is “Changing hearts and taking names”. My goal is to change the hearts of people, not in a radical way, but simple reminders of kindness, reaching out, reminding friends the grass isn’t greener, give back, check in on other’s well-being, be a good example to kids, etc., In my films […]


My catch-phrase that I created, is “Changing hearts and taking names”. My goal is to change the hearts of people, not in a radical way, but simple reminders of kindness, reaching out, reminding friends the grass isn’t greener, give back, check in on other’s well-being, be a good example to kids, etc., In my films or when I meet people I tell them what inspires me, and remind people to open their eyes an ears to help people in need right in front of them. Videos go viral when someone helps another to cross the street because it’s uncommon to be so selfless and kind anymore. My movement would be to change and soften hearts of others, through the messages in my films, so people don’t even hesitate being kind to others, that friends will be loyal, that families will stay together, hating and judging will come to an end….. Even if one heart can change, or one life, it’s all worth it.


I had the pleasure of interviewing Pamela Perrine. Pamela is an American actress, director, and screenwriter. Born in New Mexico and raised in Georgia, she knew at a young age she wanted to change the world one scene at a time. She made her writing and directorial debut in 2018, with the highly anticipated film, “Angels in Rocket Field.” The short film, was produced by her company, The Hawk Swoops Productions, shot on location in Georgia. A proud member of SAG-AFTRA for over 20 years, Pamela has been in many TV shows, films and written several screenplays.”The Journeyman”, a psychological thriller, which she also wrote and will be directed, just wrapped at the end of March and is currently in post production.


Thank you so much for joining us! Can you tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

While I was waiting for actor bookings and callbacks, I decided I wanted to make a movie. I’ve been writing screenplays for years, but I was inspired to write something specific for my directorial debut last April. Angels in Rocket Field stars Tray Chaney (The Wire, Saints & Sinners) and Michael Abbott Jr. (The Death of Dick Long, In the Radiant City, Mud).

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started this career?

There was a time a newbie red carpet interviewer called me over, and was asking how I liked the film…. several minutes and questions later, I said, “Excuse me, I wasn’t in that film”. Needless to say, the newbie mistook me for Sandra Bullock. We were both very embarrassed, but I’ll take it! I was there supporting another of my friend’s film.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

There’s a scene where a bully grabs a baseball from the lead actor’s glove and throws it down the street to taunt him. The ball was supposed to be thrown in the opposite direction. When Michael Abbott Jr.’s character retrieves the ball, he’s coming from the opposite direction, therefore, he wouldn’t have been able to get to the ball, making the continuity lacking. The one thing that may have saved me, the movie has angels in it so, he could have miraculously retrieved the ball from anywhere before handing it to the boy. But it was a lesson well learned for me as I did not have a script supervisor on my first film, whom would have caught that detail. Trying to save a few extra bucks can lead to something that could throw your entire film off. Abbott Jr., lives in New York and pick up shots were not possible.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I just wrapped a film I wrote and directed called, The Journeyman. It stars Jay Mohr (Ghost Whisperer, Jerry Maguire), and Anthony Reynolds (Trial by Fire, Black Lightning, That Evening Sun). The main track is by Moby. It’s a psychological thriller that deals with mental health issues, and I’ve woven in a conspiracy, but that won’t be added until the feature.

Who are some of the most interesting people you have interacted with? What was that like?

Do you have any stories? Well everyone is interesting in this business, because we are all artists and creators, with an insatiable desire to be acknowledged. I have so many stories, I wouldn’t know where to start. But what I’ve learned is that I enjoy working with older people because not only do I learn from them, they have the best stories about the business, funny stories, Old Hollywood, before digital, before Netflix. I also gravitate toward people who are serious and focused, and who are working to see their dreams manifest. I respect them, because I understand the grind. Lastly, and most importantly, I love working with friends and meeting new friends along the way, it doesn’t get any better than that.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

As a filmmaker and an actor, my goal is to inspire and change hearts, even one. That’s why I do it, and anyone that know me, knows that. So, 1st, be sure you have a purpose besides, money or fame, because that’s not enough. Ask yourself, “How can I make an impact in some way while I’m pursuing this dream?” There are so many ways. To be able to tell your children that some day, will resonate more than a residual check. Also, it’s paramount to enjoy your life, family, friends, faith, self-care, while your are reaching these goals. Whatever makes you laugh, day trips, serving the homeless, hiking, Taco Tuesday… stay connected with reality (maybe not talking about the industry or taking a break from actor/director friends) and the people and places that mean something special to you. We can’t get that time back.

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger.

My catch-phrase that I created, is “Changing hearts and taking names”. My goal is to change the hearts of people, not in a radical way, but simple reminders of kindness, reaching out, reminding friends the grass isn’t greener, give back, check in on other’s well-being, be a good example to kids, etc., In my films or when I meet people I tell them what inspires me, and remind people to open their eyes an ears to help people in need right in front of them. Videos go viral when someone helps another to cross the street because it’s uncommon to be so selfless and kind anymore. My movement would be to change and soften hearts of others, through the messages in my films, so people don’t even hesitate being kind to others, that friends will be loyal, that families will stay together, hating and judging will come to an end….. Even if one heart can change, or one life, it’s all worth it.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Don’t take rejection personally: When you write, produce and direct a film, it becomes very personal to you. Like art, not everyone will like it, understand it, or even care about it. I didn’t always receive support, and after the hard work I put in, I felt like I had accomplished so much, and I had. So don’t do it for other’s approval, do it for the purity of the art, the story, and because it makes you happy.
  2. Understand every crew member’s role on a set: When I’m acting, I show up on set, do my scene, and leave. I didn’t fully understand what each crew member did. As a director, I learned to appreciate and respect everyone from PA’s to grips and how critical each person is to effectively run a well oiled machine on set. Every single crew member brings value and skills that are essential to making a good film.
  3. Don’t compare yourself to others: Like all humans, we have insecurities. In this industry we see others get lucky breaks or get favors done for them, whether ethically or not, it doesn’t matter. Work hard, believe in yourself, do things with integrity, treat people with kindness, and give back. Be of the work, and doors will start to open for you. There is truly room for success for everyone. An audience for every film and a role for every type. Do you and be you!
  4. Time is your friend: Overnight successes are rarely ever that, usually taking 10 to 15 years with few exception. When I was young living in New York I always felt so impulsive, even moving to LA prematurely once I got my SAG card. Train and study, be healthy, take care of yourself, time with friends and family, learn learn learn, go to plays, read plays, read scripts, write, travel, help others, be curious, have a dream journal. All of these things I do but I wish I had done them so much sooner, often and consistently. They make for better actors and filmmakers in the end.
  5. Action plans: I learned long ago, if I didn’t organize, map out and write down my goals and plans, they were less likely to happen, or at least not as quickly as I wanted. Once I started making my vision boards of where I saw myself and what I saw myself doing, maps pinned with places I wanted to travel, spreadsheets tracking timelines of contacts, goals, progress, sticky notes of goals and affirmations, dry erase boards and chalkboards of relevant motivational quotes, so on and so forth, my vision became clearer. Manifestation is a real thing and it’s beautiful when it unfolds because of your hard work and planning. Be confident and execute your plan.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life? I’ve always been quite fond of this quote:

“There are two types of pain in this world: The pain of discipline and the pain of regret. You can only avoid one.” — Unknown

This applies to every aspect of my life. Being disciplined does not come easy for me. As a free spirit, I like to just go and do. But I’m also very results oriented and that conflicts with a the mind of a free spirit. So not wanting to have a life filled with regret, which I don’t, I have a very strong work ethic, laser focus and do what I set my mind to. I may fail. But I keep going. My goal again, is to change hearts not become famous. To be an example my son can be proud of. And if at any level of success I reach, always give back to others. How could I have regrets if I stick with that?!

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

Years ago, I was given a break, my first job in New York, by a casting director assistant James Mottram who worked for Sylvia Fay Casting in New York. There were literally 400 background actors in holding to do the explosion scene in the Holland Tunnel with Sylvester Stallone. Out of all of those actors he picked me to do a speaking role as a reporter with Sylvester Stallone, and I was immediately upgraded and got a SAG voucher and got my SAG (SAG-AFTRA) card within a few months. I was just sitting there with my walkman on waiting like everyone else! The scene was cut, but I felt like I was on my way because someone believed in me. Soon after the same cd called me for a job on Law & Order.

Some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might see this.

Mark Burnett. I would like to discuss with him, over lunch, faith, family and films.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

Instagram: @thepamelaperrine & @thehawkswoopsproductions, Twitter @pamelajperrine, FB @pamelaperrineatlanta

Thank you so much for joining us. This was very inspirational!

Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

Thrive Global
People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.