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Rising Star Ginger Marin: “It is the responsibility of every human to care for the planet; It is, after all, our only home.”

I believe wholeheartedly that it is the responsibility of every human to care for the planet. It is, after all, our only home. That means to care for each other and every other species in existence along with our natural resources. To abuse our world the way humans have done for so long is insane. […]


I believe wholeheartedly that it is the responsibility of every human to care for the planet. It is, after all, our only home. That means to care for each other and every other species in existence along with our natural resources. To abuse our world the way humans have done for so long is insane. The fact that our governments would rather support business profits over people’s lives and wellbeing is downright criminal. My movement would educate and make meaningful changes to protect our land, water and air and institute serious protections for animal rights.


As a part of my interview series with popular culture stars, I had the pleasure of interviewing Ginger Marin. Ginger is an actor, writer and former network TV journalist. She wrote for Tom Brokaw, Maria Shriver, Linda Ellerbee and numerous other news anchors before trading in her news shingle for acting and screenwriting. Right now, she’s happy to be doing exactly what she always dreamed of while at the same time, drawing on her past skills and experiences from the newsroom.


Thank you so much for joining us! Can you tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

When I was about six years old and trying to figure out what I wanted to be when I grew up, I had a hard time coming up with just one thing because I wanted to do and be so many things. Then it dawned on me that the best path I could choose would be as an actor because then I could potentially be anything … a writer, scientist, doctor, lawyer and on and on. At the same time, I have been a writer pretty much all my life. I loved creating short stories and using my imagination to delve into new lives and new worlds. An actor and a writer are simply two sides of the same coin.

In college, I finally had the opportunity to study acting and related performance arts along with TV/film production. I always knew where I was headed. It just took me awhile to get there.

During college, I also had the opportunity to work at NBC News. Then, upon finishing school, I worked my way up to writer/producer which was very rewarding but it certainly took me away from acting and writing the things I wanted. Years later, a new opportunity arose and I decided to move from New York to Los Angeles to begin my chosen career path in earnest.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started this career?

Years after meeting my writing partner in an acting class, I learned that he had been in a CIA-sanctioned black ops unit in his past. It was a three-man team. It’s quite something to see a new side of someone you’ve known for years. I then became friends with one of his black ops partners and later met the family of another one. Because of my writing partner’s background, I was introduced to shooting as a sport, a valuable skill to have in this industry, among other things.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

I don’t know if this is actually the funniest mistake but I remember having one of my first auditions where I had to speak two lines in German. I had studied German in college so I knew I could deliver the lines fairly well but what I didn’t count on was having my stage fright kick in at the same time. Three people were in the room all waiting for me to speak the lines. I could barely get my mouth to work with each attempt as the very nice people watched in sympathy. The expression on one woman’s face was ‘Come on, you can do it.’ Alas, I could not. I left the room utterly mortified. I learned two lessons that day. One, I needed to get a handle on my stage fright and second, that I could and would survive anything this business tosses at me.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I am co-writing a screenplay based on my writing partner’s true life experience as a CIA subcontractor in a black ops unit which I mentioned earlier. I helped edit his published memoir. This new screenplay will be the eighth we’ve written together. On my own, I’m writing an animated feature film set on Mars and I’m continuing to develop an animated TV series with more of an adult theme. Writing animation is a blast and I think the TV series, in particular, really lets my creative juices flow wild.

Who are some of the most interesting people you have interacted with? What was that like? Do you have any stories?

Right after I moved to Los Angeles, I looked for an acting class. I found actor Guy Stockwell who was well known to me as I had seen him often on TV and film when I was growing up. His credits go back to 1946, in fact, and he guest-starred in some of the most popular TV shows nearly up until the year I had met him.

So, I called the number in the ad, expecting to get a secretary on the line, and instead, Guy himself answered. I ended up studying with him for several years and I’m glad I did. I can honestly say he has given me some of the best experiences in acting and improvisation. His recommendations alone got me my first voice acting job and a lead in a play. Guy became a personal friend who sadly is no longer with us and is someone I miss greatly. His advice and encouragement resonates with me to this day

He once told a story about another actor he was very close with who told him he couldn’t give Guy his home address because he (the other actor) was “a very important person” and couldn’t risk other people finding out where he lived. Guy laughed and it was quite obvious that the “very important person” thought more of himself than anyone else did. Bottom line: humility is a good virtue everyone in this business should have.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

Never lose your sense of wonder. Be active, aware and eager to learn new things. Pay attention to what’s going on in the world. Your job is to evoke empathy. You can’t be empathetic if you aren’t aware of people, their needs, desires and obstacles.

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I believe wholeheartedly that it is the responsibility of every human to care for the planet. It is, after all, our only home. That means to care for each other and every other species in existence along with our natural resources. To abuse our world the way humans have done for so long is insane. The fact that our governments would rather support business profits over people’s lives and wellbeing is downright criminal. My movement would educate and make meaningful changes to protect our land, water and air and institute serious protections for animal rights.

I am also a firm believer in the NonHuman Rights Project whose work is to secure fundamental rights for nonhuman animals through litigation, legislation, and education. An ethical world order would benefit all.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

1. Be Yourself: It is your personality and outlook that shade your performance or writing. That’s what makes you unique.

2. Don’t Take it Personally: Casting is based upon many different factors and you have control only over your own audition performance and nothing else. So if you don’t get a part, move on. Example: I often get auditions to play someone’s mother. Well, I may not get cast if they have a child/teen in mind and we don’t look like we would be related. 
3. The Magic Word is “Next”: You audition, you move on. You don’t get a part, you move on. Your script doesn’t get attention, write another one. Just keep moving forward.

4. Don’t Listen to the Naysayers: (although I’m pretty sure I heard this one early on, I certainly subscribe to it as I’m still hearing naysayers in my life even now). Some people keep saying the entertainment business is so hard, just give it up. My response is ‘no thanks’. Working and continually trying to get to the level I aspire to is what gives me happiness.

5. Keep in Touch: Staying in touch with people you’ve worked with is hard but this business is also about relationships. People want to work with others they get along with. I’d like to be viewed as one of those trustworthy, creative, professional types.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.” — Pablo Picasso. Ignorance is not bliss, not in this industry or any other. Whether it’s acting or writing, you really do need to learn the rules (and norms). Knowledge is power. Knowledge gives direction. And knowledge provides alternatives.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

As far as acting, again I have to mention Guy Stockwell. He broadened my understanding of the art of acting and gave me a level of confidence when I had doubts. He was very astute in how he analyzed a performance and it was what he saw in my work that led me to believe I had something to contribute.

As far as writing, that goes way back to high school. One teacher in particular recognized my creativity and she regularly read my work before the class. After awhile, she didn’t even have to say my name; the class would just turn and look at me and sure enough, it was my material she was reading. I am to this day grateful for the recognition. I have never stopped writing and never will.

Some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might see this. 🙂

There are many, actually. I would love to have the opportunity to talk shop with Gary Oldman. He’s brilliant and I want to learn so much more about his process in taking on a part. Steven Spielberg, James Cameron and Ridley Scott are such exceptional filmmakers. I’d love to be in their films and also shadow them as they work to learn their techniques. I’d like to meet Keanu Reeves because I so appreciated his skill and dedication in two of my favorite action franchises, The Matrix and John Wick. Seriously, I could go on and on. But thank you for the opportunity to allow me to ponder so many things in this interview.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/pub/ginger-marin/5b/422/ba5/

My Blog: http://bioniclady.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ginger_marin

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/GingerMarin

Thank you so much for joining us. This was very inspirational!

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