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Rising Music Star Vinnie Vidal: “There is always something to be learned from everyone”

Taking a little bit of information from everyone because there is always something to be learned from everyone. I never really had anyone specific because I have always felt that you cannot rely solely on one person for success. No one will see your vision clearer than yourself, hustle harder than you, etc, if you […]

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Taking a little bit of information from everyone because there is always something to be learned from everyone. I never really had anyone specific because I have always felt that you cannot rely solely on one person for success. No one will see your vision clearer than yourself, hustle harder than you, etc, if you rely on others for validation you are setting yourself up for failure. Remember to take everything with a grain of salt because in the past I have taken information from people that were not in the position to be giving advice. I learned the hard way in some cases but whatever, you live and you learn!


Asa part of our series about pop culture’s rising stars, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Vinnie Vidal.

Vinnie Vidal is a singer, songwriter and composer that has produced multiple singles gaining momentum with his unique sound and versatility. He brings a shift to the hip hop genre with his custom composed sounds and uncompromising integrity. Vidal started his love affair with music at age 8 and composed and directed for a church choir at age 14. He makes his beats from scratch, writes the music, sings, and raps. Vinnie developed a team called ROYAL PLAY RECORDS which helps provide consistent high-quality music. He is Middle Eastern and a Provincial Award-winning stylist.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

Idid not have an easy childhood because I was born in Baghdad, Iraq. It was unsafe for my family because of the war that was going on. To make it to Canada, we had to escape Iraq when I was 5 years old and move to Turkey until our papers in order. It took almost 3 years until we got accepted and in those years I spent most days in the barbershop helping my dad. You do not have to be 16 to work like in the western world so work ethic was instilled in me at a very young age. In 2002 we arrived in Canada and I started elementary school to learn English which became my fourth language. I always had a love for music and when I hit high school, I would go to classes in the day and cut hair in the night to fund my music dream. In 10th grade, I left high school early because I was accepted into Marvel College to become a licensed stylist and a few years later became a multiple award-winning Red Seal Cosmetologist. I still go into the salon from time to time but I am primarily just doing music now.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

Ever since I can remember I always had an ear for music. I realized it’s the only job I can do without checking the time. I can be locked in a room for weeks straight creating music and never get bored so why not pursue it? When I was 13 years old I got a call from a church because they needed a new piano player and they heard about me. Very quickly I started to compose music for the choir. I ended up quitting the live scene because I wanted to pursue recording.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

After falling in love with music and building equipment, I quickly ran out of space so, at the age of 20 years old, only 5 years ago, I bought a million-dollar house and flipped it into a studio! Everybody was shocked at the level of ambition and persistence I had.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting?

After leaving the Live scene I got into Recording. I never knew about mixing & mastering so I just recorded everything on top of each other and it sounded terrible!

Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

I realized that Live Music and Recording are two completely different things so I studied audio engineering and music production.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I am working on my first album called “Burdens & Blessings”. It is about over-coming all of the burdens in your life and handling all of the blessings life has to offer.

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

1. All of the different ethnicities and cultures are what make life beautiful.

2. It’s beneficial in TV and film because it appeals to a larger audience.

3. When diversity is shown, it creates a sense of unity and balance.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why? Please share a story or example for each.

1. Live Music and recording are two completely different things. You can be a great live performer but a bad recording artist. With experience, I’ve come to learn that it takes completely different and specialized skill sets to record, mix and master a song.

2. It’s expensive. The tools and products that are marketed in the music industry can either be portrayed as dummy friendly or cheap and a waste of time. This results in the false belief that it’s easy to make great-sounding music.

3. If you’re gonna do it — do it right. You’re going to have to invest a lot of time money and energy to get quality music.

4. Don’t be too strict on all of the rules — be willing to think outside the box. I remember listening to my music and saying to myself; “this sounds too regular, I have to be unique.”

5. You don’t have to do everything by yourself. In the beginning, I spent too much time on things that I could have just hired someone else to do. As I continued on my journey, I realized the importance of having a team.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

Balance is key! Too much of anything is bad and remember to pace yourself, eat healthily, incorporate physical activity in your day, stay hydrated and prioritize at least 7 hours of sleep.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

One of the things I like to do is travel. I have traveled to some very poor countries and you wouldn’t believe how many people live in cardboard boxes. There is no better feeling in life than living in a space that you can call your home. A lot of people don’t have roofs over their heads and I would love to solve that issue!

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

I have been mentored by some of the greatest in the industry. Taking a little bit of information from everyone because there is always something to be learned from everyone. I never really had anyone specific because I have always felt that you cannot rely solely on one person for success. No one will see your vision clearer than yourself, hustle harder than you, etc, if you rely on others for validation you are setting yourself up for failure. Remember to take everything with a grain of salt because in the past I have taken information from people that were not in the position to be giving advice. I learned the hard way in some cases but whatever, you live and you learn!

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Short cuts make long delays.”

― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

I love this quote because you really have to be willing to do the work. Many people want instant results with no hard work. It’s the turtle that wins the race!

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

I would love to meet Kanye West because I feel we share a lot of things in common and together we would have great conversations and make amazing music.

How can our readers follow you online?

Instagram: @vinnievidal

Facebook @vinnievidalmusic

Twitter @thebossvidal
Youtube.com/royalplayrecords

This was very meaningful, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!

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