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Rising Music Star Obreez: “The ones who were blessed enough to get out of the “hood,” should start programs to teach the youth about business, electronics and entrepreneurship; That is the future”

I think that the ones who made it out of the inner city communities, the ones who were blessed enough to get out of the “hood,” should start programs to teach the youth about business, electronics and entrepreneurship. That is the future. As a part of my series about pop culture’s rising stars, I had the […]

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I think that the ones who made it out of the inner city communities, the ones who were blessed enough to get out of the “hood,” should start programs to teach the youth about business, electronics and entrepreneurship. That is the future.


As a part of my series about pop culture’s rising stars, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Obreez. Obreez represents the new wave of urban artists hailing from the New York tri-state area. Obreez, born Omar Soliman was raised in the streets of Jersey City, NJ just outside of Manhattan. He is one of the few buzzing Hip-Hop artists making noise in the music industry with their dope array of talent, Obreez is here to stay. From the debut of his first video for his record, “Survival of the Hood,” shot when he was just 17 years old, Obreez showcased his captivating musical style.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

I grew up in an environment where following your dreams was almost impossible, just for the fact that I was surrounded by so many negative street activities that could have lead me astray from my goals.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path not only as a musician, but as an entrepreneur?

Honestly just the love and passion I had for music. It has always been in my family, and it made me feel good.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began?

Well, once I got the ball rolling, I found myself at arms reach with individuals that already achieved the goals I was trying to do. I cherished their advice to keep ahead of the game and remain successful in the music industry.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

If I didn’t make mistakes when I first started, it would be impossible to get where I am at now. But I didn’t really understand the independent route, on how you can and should establish your music and presence through the internet, and with digital marketing.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I just released my EP ‘Rich b4 Rap’ on all platforms also collaborated with Long Beach, California artist, $tupid Young.

I’m very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in the music industry? How can that potentially affect our culture?

If you believe your product, or music, is something special or different most likely it will work out for you. That being said diversity will let you experience other genres communicate with other artists. At the end of it all this is music, this is what changes a person’s mood, whether it’s rock, rap or pop. We have a strong impact on our listeners. We don’t want it to only be about one genre because we want music to be inclusive.

From your personal experience, can you recommend three things the community/society/the industry can do to help address some of the diversity issues in the entertainment business?

I believe that some artists need to quit portraying an image that they are not. I understand it’s entertainment, but at the same time it can be very dangerous to falsify your image. Also, I believe whether you’re in the industry or not, an artist should be able to create songs based on their experiences instead of agreeing on the industry’s point of view.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story, or an example for each.

  1. Invest every dollar into your brand.
  2. Success does not come overnight.
  3. There were times that I wanted to quit and I did for a year, and that’s something I wish I never did.
  4. Have confidence in your product.
  5. In my personal experience, be aware of who you trust.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

Always have fun with what your doing, as a team believe in each other make sure everyone sticks to the plan.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I think that the ones who made it out of the inner city communities, the ones who were blessed enough to get out of the “hood,” should start programs to teach the youth about business, electronics and entrepreneurship. That is the future.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

I look up to my father the most. Although he is not too familiar with the music industry, he was always a wise businessman. A really stand up guy. If it was not for him, I wouldn’t be where I’m at today.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

Show me your friends and I will tell you who you are. My mother used to say that to me all the time. Sometimes your friends, or even family does not share the same vision as you. Sometimes you have to outgrow them with success.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

Haha, great question! I always wanted to speak with author Robert Kiyosaki. His books have influenced me to analyze financial knowledge which I think is very important

How can our readers follow you on social media?

Instagram: @obreez

Youtube: Obreez Official

Spotify: Obreez

Twitter: ObreezTheDon1

This was very meaningful, thank you so much!

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