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Rising Music Star Nizzle Man: “I’d like to start a movement to develop programs that educate the youth on the morals and values of life”

I would start a movement that would take back the community. I want to work with community leaders nationwide that are accountable for their actions and willing to lead with a positive example. I want to work with the people who are willing to make the best choices for the betterment of their community. I […]

I would start a movement that would take back the community. I want to work with community leaders nationwide that are accountable for their actions and willing to lead with a positive example. I want to work with the people who are willing to make the best choices for the betterment of their community. I would develop programs that educate the youth on the morals and values of life. I would like to start in my hometown in Staten Island, but my goal is to take the program nationally and then internationally.


As a part of my series about pop culture’s rising stars, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Nizzle Man.

Nizzle is an independent artist, songwriter and producer from Staten Island, New York. Drawing from the influences of his Puerto Rican and African American heritage, Nizzle Man has cultivated a sound of his own. Distinctly recognized for his unique vocals and distinctive tone, he’s passionate and committed to his artistry as well as the evolution of music. He stands out from the crowd, especially today, with the eruption of unique and diversified sounds.

Nizzle Man is a rare and mind-blowing artist. He exudes each performance with a huge far-reaching sound that is energetic, compelling, and passionate. Nizzle Man stands on his motto, “Be it one or 1,000!” He remains dedicated to the crowd and blows them away night after night.

Nizzle Man currently resides in Los Angeles, CA, where he continues to promote new music and build his brand. Nizzle Man’s most recent performances include IFSM International Fashion SuperModel Grand Finale in Los Angeles; Justina Valentine’s Favorite Vibe Tour; The Venue Austin; ATF Vegan Festival in Austin, Texas; Scratch House in Austin, Texas; Headliner for Major Stage at SOB’s NYC; and the Rich Off Life Experience Hosted by Hot 97 Shaboogie.

Alongside his personal artistry, Nizzle Man has the rare ability to speak to your soul with his expressive and poignant lyrics. Since Nizzle Man moved to California, he’s produced and wrote music with various artists such as five-time Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Candace Wakefield, Donnie Klang, Mikey See, Def Jam Recording Artist John Lindahl, Shyheim Franklin and Makaylo Van Peebles.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

Igrew up in Staten Island, New York with my two sisters, my parents. My Mom was overprotective and loving when it came to her only boy (me). My Dad, who was way older than my mother, didn’t understand how to show a young boy love, as his dad (my grandfather) died when he was just 14 years old. My dad’s lack of affection towards me made me feel unwanted when I was growing up. As a result, I often acted out in school and engaged in negative activities. At one point, I expressed how I felt through my music, but I didn’t find any resolve in this. To be honest, I realized that my father wasn’t getting younger and I had decided to let go of the hurt and made a conscious effort to rebuild our relationship.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

At the age of 12 I was a fan of the popular tv series, American Idol. I admired the show for giving aspiring singers an opportunity to showcase their talent. I wanted to appear on the show, however, I didn’t want to sing because I couldn’t; I was able to rap over beats though. That same year, there was a local talent show called “Staten Idol ‘’ and the guidelines allowed for any talent submissions. I signed up for it, and I remember the judges saying “I don’t understand what he was saying but it sounded good!” I was the runner up, winning second place and that event is what triggered me to focus on a career in the music industry.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

I would have to say the most interesting moment in my career was when I opened for Lil Kim on the All Access tour. I was the youngest act there and it was in my hometown of New York (in the Bronx). I remember stepping on stage and seeing at least 200 of my friends and family from Staten Island going crazy in the crowd and I hit them with my motto, “I’m what they talkin ‘bout!”

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

The funniest mistake I can remember making was showing my friends and classmates in school the rough music I had made, straight out of the booth. Even those that really enjoyed listening to the music had a lot of critique on the sound quality and additions to be made. The songs were all out whack, straight horrible mixes and that’s when I learned the hard way that consumers need to only hear the finished product. I refer to consumers because if you are brainstorming and show another artist or musically talented individual your tracks, they could steal your vision. The consumer, the audience, loves the finished painting, not the work in progress . . . and to a music artist, that finished artwork is a properly mixed and mastered song.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

Right now I’m working on my debut EP. It is self titled “New Island.” I’m also continuously writing and co-writing with a few upcoming pop stars from New York. Be on the lookout for us on the Summer 2020 tour schedules!

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in the music industry? How can that potentially affect our culture?

I would have to say that the first reason is that no man or woman is created looking exactly the same, maybe with the exception of siblings. With that being said, there will always be a need to have a relatable influence. We need to share and embrace multiple nationalities in the music industry to bring people together in a positive manner.

Secondly, I feel that diversity can breed happiness, as opposed to hostility and anger. It shows the growth we have made as mankind, it shows freedom.

And last but not least, if we didn’t have diversity in the music industry, we would be living the past over and over again, and regretfully, some form of slavery would prevail in present day.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

I wish someone had told me the difference between being rich and being famous. I can go out to eat and people will know who I am, take pictures with me and I will notice that I have 1000 more likes on Instagram. Then I can go look at my Wells Fargo account balance and it’s like, “Ok, this ain’t adding up lol!” Just because you have notariety does not necessarily equate to wealth, and vice versa!

I wish someone had told me, “Don’t hold onto music, let it breathe…” I had a sit down meeting with Epic Records to discuss potential business. I had played them a couple of my records and they replied, “Why are these in your computer?” This showed me the importance behind releasing content, to always be releasing content.

I wish someone had told me that it’s okay to spend 16 hrs a day in the studio. That it is normal to hustle that much when you are chasing a dream. If I had known that, I would have second guessed myself so many times in the past. That doesn’t bother me now though!

I wish someone would have told me that being on tour takes stamina. It’s not just a free for all. On my first tour, the Favorite Vibe tour with Justina Valentine, we were literally pulling into one state, performing, back on bus, then just 8 hrs later performing again in another state. If I would have known then what I know now, I would have spent more time in the gym to keep fit for the tour!

I also wish someone had told me that there’s such a thing as brand marketing and that there are people who are just geniuses at this! People go to school and earn degrees in branding! Oh, and “Hey, maybe you should have a PR team!”

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

I would say the best way to stay motivated is to constantly listen to your unreleased music. This is a good way to ensure that you have a solid product, but always be on the lookout for new ways to hone your craft. Only seek advice from people that are non-biased and have a strong ear for good music. This will give you honest feedback that you can take into serious consideration. Another one of my top tips is to stay updated on the newest producers and hottest DJs in major cities like New York, Miami, LA and London.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I would start a movement that would take back the community. I want to work with community leaders nationwide that are accountable for their actions and willing to lead with a positive example. I want to work with the people who are willing to make the best choices for the betterment of their community. I would develop programs that educate the youth on the morals and values of life. I would like to start in my hometown in Staten Island, but my goal is to take the program nationally and then internationally.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

I am truly thankful for my Mom, although she will never get to read this. She always believed in me and told me she had dreamt of me performing my music in front of thousands of fans. She accepted and respected my occupation as an artist, and for that, I am eternally thankful.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Stay ten toes down.” It’s an urban reference meaning to stand firm, stand for something or fall for everything. Artists like Nav and the late Nipsey Hussle often reference this quote in their lyrics. It’s relevant to me because I am faced with deals and business moves that make you question your morality every day. I know that it is typical in the music industry, but when these situations arise, I stand true to what I believe in.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

Honestly, I would like to sit down with Nelly. But not just privately with him, I would love to sit with his whole executive staff. Nelly is one of my biggest influences. I feel like we are similar artists in the sense we both have a unique sound. Just as Nelly put St. Louis on the map with Country Grammar, one of the best-selling rap albums of all time. I want to do the same for my city, Staten Island. You guys can tell Nelly, Nizzle Man can do great things For Dirty Ent.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

You can visit my site at Officialnizzle.Com or follow me online at:

Facebook: Nizzle Man Promo

Twitter: @OfficialNizzle

Instagram: @OfficialNizzle

YouTube: ChainGangMusic

Spotify: NizzleMan

Apple Music: NizzleMan

This was very meaningful, thank you so much!

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