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Rising Music Star Lena Stone: “I’d like to start a movement to see more equal representation for women in country music, specifically country radio”

I would love to see more equal representation for women in country music, specifically country radio. There are literally hundreds of incredible women in Nashville and across the country writing beautiful, honest, important country music that isn’t make its way to the people who would love to hear those songs. It’s a conversation that has […]

I would love to see more equal representation for women in country music, specifically country radio. There are literally hundreds of incredible women in Nashville and across the country writing beautiful, honest, important country music that isn’t make its way to the people who would love to hear those songs. It’s a conversation that has already started in the industry, but I’d love to see some of the big players at labels and at radio take some concrete steps toward addressing the inequality and getting more female voices heard.


I had the pleasure of interviewing Lena Stone. Lena released her latest single, “Personal Space,” on February 7th and is currently planning on releasing her new EP,”Princess,” in early spring.

Stone is an original member of the Song Suffragettes showcase and movement. She was featured on the viral “Time’s Up” track that swept across the country as the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements made their way into country music.

She has penned over 600 songs in the last few years, including breakthrough hits for fellow up-and-coming country females Kalie Shorr (“Two Hands,” “Fight Like A Girl”) Kasey Tyndall and more.

The Carlisle, MA native started writing songs at age 8 and playing guitar since she was 14. After attending a GRAMMY Songwriting camp in LA, she met hit songwriter Darrell Brown (Keith Urban, Faith Hill) who urged her to move to Nashville at 18 to pursue her passion for music.

Stone is eager to help causes and organizations she’s passionate about. A huge heart for animals, she’s been a vegetarian since the age of 5 and has been loyal to cruelty free products for years.

Her musical influences include James Taylor, Jennifer Nettles, Sara Evans, Eric Church, Joni Mitchell, Carol King and more.

For more information, visit LenaStone.com and follow her on FacebookInstagramTwitter and YouTube.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

Igrew up in a little 5,000 population town called Carlisle, MA about 40 minutes outside of Boston. I’m the oldest of 3 daughters who all love to sing, and we grew up with a ton of music in the house.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

My grandma (Mima) is one of my favorite people in the entire world, and she has spent her entire life writing songs. My dad also wrote songs in his free time when I was growing up, so I always thought everyone wrote songs and that that was just the way people expressed themselves. Fast forward to age 8 or so and I started writing little bits of lyrics and melodies here and there, and as I got older and picked up guitar my songwriting became even more of a passion. In high school I went to the GRAMMY foundation’s summer camp (Grammy Camp), and was able to work with the incredible songwriter Darryl Brown who suggested I move to Nashville when I graduated, which is exactly what I did!

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

When I was 16 and still living in Carlisle, I was booked online to play a music festival in a nearby city. I was so excited to be invited to play that I brought along my parents, my two little sisters and my grandma and grandpa. When we got there, me in my little free people sundress and flipflops holding my acoustic guitar, we realized it was a hard rock/metal festival! I was not only the only female performer, I was also the only person who wasn’t dressed in black with tattoos and piercings. I was so intimidated, but everyone was so kind to me and really took the time to listen to my set and cheer me on. Life lesson- do a little research before you agree to play a show, you never know what you might be walking into!

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I have a new EP coming out this spring that I’m incredibly excited about. We recorded it last year and so recently I’ve been really busy creating the visuals to accompany the music, whether its photos or music videos. It’s my first time really being involved in the graphic design part of sharing music which is such a fun process and form of expression in itself — and we have some really exciting things coming soon!

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

I think diversity in entertainment is absolutely essential, because representation in film and TV and music is how the next generation learns about the world they are inheriting, and everyone deserves to see themselves reflected in the world around them. I remember hearing a long time ago that when you see something presented in TV, even if it’s totally fictional, it makes that idea easier to digest in real life. So seeing a movie with a female president makes it possible for everyone to have an image in their head of what a female president could be like.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why.

That’s a hard one! Ok here goes….

  1. Your first songs are not your best songs, and they aren’t supposed to be.
  2. Patience is so much more valuable than you realize.
  3. The most authentic version of yourself is also the version that the most people will connect with.
  4. Balance is everything — it’s ok to take an afternoon to watch a movie or go for a hike or grab a glass of wine with your girlfriends. You can’t write songs about your life if you don’t have a life to write about.
  5. You will hear 100 “no’s” for every “yes.” That doesn’t make hearing “no” any easier, and it’s ok to be bummed out as long as you can get up the next day and keep chasing your dream.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

See #4 above- I wish I had figured that out a long time ago! But I credit balance with my ability to ride the highs and the lows and come out on the other side.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I would love to see more equal representation for women in country music, specifically country radio. There are literally hundreds of incredible women in Nashville and across the country writing beautiful, honest, important country music that isn’t make its way to the people who would love to hear those songs. It’s a conversation that has already started in the industry, but I’d love to see some of the big players at labels and at radio take some concrete steps toward addressing the inequality and getting more female voices heard.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

There are so many people who have helped get me to where I am today, it’s hard to know where to start! I have a really incredible team here in Nashville who I am incredibly grateful for, and of course all of my friends and co-writers who have taken the time to write songs with me and help tell my story. But I think most of all I’m grateful for my parents, who have believed in me since day one and never wavered- I wouldn’t still be here chasing my dreams if it weren’t for their love and support.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

My favorite life lesson quote is actually engraved on a ring that I wear every single day, and have since I was sixteen years old. It was a gift from my grandparents, and it says “follow your heart even if it hurts.” Whether it’s in life or love or music, I have never regretted following my heart.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

If I could have lunch with anyone, I think I would pick Taylor Swift. I’ve always been in awe of her songwriting and her business sense, and I would love to thank her for inspiring me to make music.

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