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Rising Music Star Cristol: “Create your own sound and be a trendsetter; don’t worry about what everyone else does”

Stay true to yourself and don’t worry about what everyone else does. Create your own sound and be a trendsetter. To take this seriously, treat it like a real business and have fun, never lose your purpose or the reason you started making music. As a part of our interview series with the rising stars […]

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Stay true to yourself and don’t worry about what everyone else does. Create your own sound and be a trendsetter. To take this seriously, treat it like a real business and have fun, never lose your purpose or the reason you started making music.


As a part of our interview series with the rising stars in pop culture, I had the pleasure of interviewing music star Cristol.

St. Petersburg, Fla. native and Hussch Boy Productions artist, Cristol has been turning heads for some time now as one of Florida’s hottest new entertainers via his mixtape World Wide, hosted by Bigga Rankin and DJ Winn.

Cristol is, and has been, best known for a style of Hip Hop known as jook. Originating in the South, and fusing Bounce, bass, and some dancehall & reggae elements, jook music also features a unique dancing style of the same name, made famous by Lil Buck.

“You won’t hear me rapping about shooting, killing or flipping bricks,” Cristol explains, “because I don’t do that.”

Cristol’s latest single is “Country Twerk” with country music singer Skyler Clark. The single is an ode to blending America’s favorite musical genres: rap and country music. It is his mission to bring fun and togetherness back to the nation in a time where it may all be forgotten.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

Igrew up on the Southside of St Petersburg, Florida. We didn’t have money and lived in an alley next to a trap house where they sold lots of drugs — with my mother, my stepdad and three younger sisters.

My father was in prison most of my upbringing but every time he got out, he made it his business to help me with my music, teaching me and the singing group I was part of all about 4-part harmony.

Music was always my life. My first talent show was in middle school in 1994. Prior to that i played the saxophone and in high school, I became very popular when I performed R. Kelly’s “I believe I can fly.”

I’m very close to my family, we were raised very tight knit and they were always my biggest fans. All my friends lived a lifestyle embedded in the streets but somehow they made it their business to keep me in music and school and NOT in the streets.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

I was born into it. The first time I saw my dad sing was the day I fell in love with music. I was just a little kid singing around the house and I remember my grandmother telling me I was going to be a singer. She said it was my dad’s influence, but I always felt the music within me.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

Well a lot of people use to tell me not to make twerk music and now I’m receiving fan videos from as far as Hong Kong and they are twerking to my music! Twerk music is one of the most popular forms of hip hop music in the world today.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

I put together my first cd release party and had a great turn out making really good money. So with all this money, I had just made from the door and a big crowd before me, I started an impromptu performance and got a little too excited and threw the money out towards the crowd of people. I went home with a sick stomach lol

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

My new single “Country Twerk” is the most exciting project thus far, it’s allowing me to cross over into a lane I never knew would be possible for me. Because of this song, my next project in the works is so amazing, I have a few Reggae-based songs I’m working on, a new club anthem to follow up Country Twerk which is called “The Don.”

I’m also writing music for other artists now and I even started producing music again, so it’s a very exciting time now. I feel like all my creative juices are just flowing abundantly.

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in music, film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

Diversity is one of the main reasons I did the song Country Twerk. I wanted to bring two different cultures together and have fun under one roof. I’m ashamed of how divided the country is right now and we are in 2020 — it shouldn’t be this bad. It’s important that people see diversity on television, in film and music.

  1. When music artists collaborate with other artists from different cultures and backgrounds, it allows people to vibe to a different sound or style they wouldn’t usually give a chance to. Music has always been the universal language and some people just have to be tricked into trying something different.
  2. It’s important to show diversity on film and television because people need to be able to connect to something and to see people on tv that look like them and that have been where they are going.
  3. The single most greatest thing we as a people got wrong was learning to hate each other for the shades of our skin. People need to see diversity because it’s the right thing to do, it should just be a normal thing and diversity in entertainment shouldn’t be up for discussion at all because we are one human race.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. To properly record your song in a good studio and have it mixed and right. It’s the most important thing to do. You want to make sure you sound like a major artist.
  2. Do not rush to put out a song. Make sure you have a good song, test it first, make sure the business is done right on the song and then release it. I’ve sat on records for years before releasing!
  3. I wish I would have known that being on the radio didn’t mean immediate success. There’s so much more to this than just having a song on a radio station.
  4. To stop dropping so many mixtapes when nobody knows you, focus on a hit single first, get the fanbase then release more music.
  5. To be yourself and don’t try to sound like ur favorite artist.. This was a big mistake I made for about 7 years of my career. The day I discovered my natural voice was the day I started making my biggest songs

Which tips would you recommend to people in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

Stay true to yourself and don’t worry about what everyone else does. Create your own sound and be a trendsetter. To take this seriously, treat it like a real business and have fun, never lose your purpose or the reason you started making music.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

To educate the youth about health and finance in a way they’d truly understand and want to apply it to their life.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

My guy Micah Anderson is one person I’m so grateful to have on my team. He’s always been in my corner and I feel like God sent him to me to help me get where I am now. There were also people who helped me before he came along and I also have to give them a shoutout.

My boy Trav, Omar, Champ & Pop pushed me to be who I am and invested time and money into me early on in my career. My cousin Marcus also came in a time when I needed it most and invested in me and I’m soooo grateful for him! My friend Omar, who now travels with me and handles my business on the road.

Lastly, I have to thank my mom, my dad, my sisters, my aunts, uncle and friends who have been my support system, I love them and I’m so grateful for them.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

Thank God everyday.

Once I realized how this thing we call life works, giving thanks for what you have is the best way to be blessed with more to be appreciative of.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

I would love to have breakfast, lunch or dinner with Angela Bassett because she is from my hometown and I just want to talk to her and let her know how proud of her I am.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

My Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat is @Cristolmusic

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