Community//

Rising Music Star Amy Jack: “Health is the foundation of your inspiration and success; If I could start a movement, I would advocate for personal health and well-being”

I think the most important thing that you can do is to take care of yourself. This looks different for everyone, but for me, it looks like controlling my physical and mental health. I really believe that your health is the foundation of your inspiration and success, so if I could start a movement, I […]

I think the most important thing that you can do is to take care of yourself. This looks different for everyone, but for me, it looks like controlling my physical and mental health. I really believe that your health is the foundation of your inspiration and success, so if I could start a movement, I would advocate for personal health and well-being.


I had the pleasure to interview Amy Jack.

Country music rising star Amy Jack’s debut album, Introducing Amy Jack, was produced by country music legend and GRAMMY-Award winning artist Merle Haggard. One of the final projects the late country star produced, Introducing Amy Jack continues to uphold Haggard’s legacy with a classic country sound that’s honest and thought provoking. Jack’s music speaks to the masses, proven by a successful track record of power features including features on the 2016 U.S. Olympic Committee’s ‘Road to Rio’ Tour, a featurette for Kobe Bryant on FOX Sports, the ESPN Network, and many more. With the helpful guidance of the iconic Merle Haggard and her expertise in the industry she has established, Amy Jack proves her music can bring together all corners of our culture.


Thank you so much for doing this with us Amy! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

Igrew up on a ranch with my mother, father and three siblings in a small town in Oklahoma. My mother was a music teacher and told us stories about teaching my twin sister and I piano and singing lessons as soon as we could walk. My father was a geologist and loved spending time outdoors. He sparked my love for nature and country music. My mother taught me how to improve on my music, which later turned into my career. Our house was always filled with music, whether my mom was playing the piano or my father was playing music on the radio, my family really shaped my love for the arts.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

I received my degree in Radio, TV & Film from the University of Oklahoma, and I originally wanted to be a reporter. I loved connecting with people and hearing their stories. But I later learned that I could share my stories through music, which sparked my dream to become a country singer.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

One night, while I was living in Nashville, I was at a writer’s round at Douglas Corner during Tin Pan South and Dobie Grey was in the round. He performed “Drift Away” and I remember a hush fell over the crowd, as everyone raised their lighters and it was an unforgettable moment. I had never experienced anything like it before, and it was one of those moments where I felt at home in the midst of all of these strangers around me. It felt like magic to me, and that was a definitive moment where I knew I wanted to make people feel the same way Dobie could through music and storytelling.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? What lesson did you learn from that?

I worked for iHeart Media as a radio sales executive. I loved the job, but would stay up all night writing songs and knew that ultimately, I wanted to be an artist. But one day, I went to work and my co-worker said, “Amy, do you realize that you’re wearing two different pairs of shoes?” And I looked down and saw I was wearing a black shoe and a blue shoe. It was really funny, and I really loved the people that I worked with. I developed so many relationships with my co-workers, who ended up helping me tremendously in my artistry. They are some of the smartest people I have ever met, and I have been blessed to have had their guidance throughout my career.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

We’re putting the finishing touches on my new song, “Vegas Style,” that I wrote with Dennis Morgan. The song was so much fun to write, and I can’t wait to perform it once it’s safe to get back on the road. I think people will really like it; it’s so fun and upbeat, I’m so excited for people to hear it.

What are 5 things you wish someone told you when you first started, and why? Please share a story or example for each.

There are countless things I have learned during my journey in music. The first being that I always try to go into projects and professional relationships with no expectations, and overdeliver to them. This way, you won’t get disappointed if things don’t pan out the way they’re supposed to.

I also learned my lesson by not taking on too many projects at one time. I used to take on too much and get burnt out and overwhelmed by my to-do’s, which meant I couldn’t put all of myself into the project, which isn’t fair to those people working with me.

The next thing I learned was to be a good listener and to follow the advice that mentors and industry friends give you. They are always right, and garnering those relationships are so important for future projects to come. I was told to always support other artists, because you never know how they can help you or how you can help them in the future. I’ve always looked for the good in people and done all I can to support them because it’s important to their success.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

I learned this when I was in Philadelphia. I was at a conference for music business and Lloyd Remick lectured on taking care of yourself first. It was a hard adjustment for me because I’m such a people-oriented person that it’s in my nature to care for others before myself, but I knew that in the long run, it was more important for me to take care of myself first and to nourish my mental health, especially during quarantine to stay inspired.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger.

I think the most important thing that you can do is to take care of yourself. This looks different for everyone, but for me, it looks like controlling my physical and mental health. I really believe that your health is the foundation of your inspiration and success, so if I could start a movement, I would advocate for personal health and well-being.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

There are so many people who attributed to my success. I had been working in radio for almost my whole career, and met so many people through that chapter of my life. There have been so many kind people who have just reached out to me and genuinely wanted to help me succeed, by passing along one of my tapes to someone or just giving me words of encouragement. One of the most influential people I met was Merle Haggard. His friendship made such a huge impact on me that he ultimately inspired me to take on this career. Just hearing his story was so inspiring to me. He went through so many personal and professional struggles to get where he ended up. He had more drive than anyone I had ever met and had so much love for people that he really became a huge inspiration of mine both personally and professionally. I want to be able to change the world like he did.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

I have several quotes that I live by, but one of my favorites is “Right is never wrong.” This comes from Nick Saban, and it’s hard to argue. Regardless of how things may pan out in the end, if you do what’s right, there will be no regrets or ‘what if’s.’

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why?

There are so many people who come to mind. I know that there are endless amounts of people in my life who are not household names that have made a lasting impact on my life. Friends and family, loved ones that truly care about your success and well-being. Especially now, I think that doctors and nurses have extraordinary stories that could really build a lasting impression on us during this time. Working double time to ensure the safety of others is just selfless work, and that really inspires me. They’ve seen miracles that cannot be explained with words, and they live their lives remaining humble with the work that they do.

How can our readers follow you online?

Check out my InstagramFacebook and Twitter for updates and a behind the scenes look into my music. You can also listen to my album, Introducing Amy Jack.

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres. We publish pieces written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Learn more or join us as a community member!
Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

Community//

“I Want To Start A Movement To Get All People With Prejudices Out Of Power” With Recording Artist Janelle Brown

by Yitzi Weiner
Community//

Laura Bryna: I want to continue making music and seeing where the dream takes me”

by Ben Ari
Community//

Stacey Blades of the Electric Radio Kings: “We are lacking love and respect for people and other musicians in our industry; we really need to pull together”

by Yitzi Weiner

Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

Thrive Global
People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.