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Radio Host Eve Harow: “Carve out a time without the phone and computer, and go offline with the people you love around you; It’s truly the greatest gift we were given”

I try to strike a balance between understanding that what I say can inspire and affect people tremendously and acknowledging how small and insignificant I am in the scope of humanity. We all need to see that life has meaning, even, or maybe especially, the difficult parts, and be grateful for what we have. I […]

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I try to strike a balance between understanding that what I say can inspire and affect people tremendously and acknowledging how small and insignificant I am in the scope of humanity. We all need to see that life has meaning, even, or maybe especially, the difficult parts, and be grateful for what we have. I can’t live without the Sabbath, Shabbat, and this isn’t a new idea. Carve out a time without the phone and computer, go offline and then online with the people you love around you. It’s truly the greatest gift we were given, to emulate our Creator by knocking off our ‘work’ and returning to ourselves, whatever that means. It’s a rebalance, and a real Shabbat is a piece of heaven.


I had the pleasure to interview Eve Harow. Eve lives her passion for her country and her people as a licensed Israeli tour guide, with her online Sunday radio broadcast “Rejuvenation with Eve Harow” on the Land of Israel Network and as a popular guest speaker in varied forums in Israel and North America. Eve, who earned a master’s degree in psychology before making aliyah in 1988, is the Director of Tourism for the One Israel Fund; on the Board of Governors of Ariel University; a member of the JNF Speaker’s Bureau and the Board of CAMERA’s Israel affiliate. Eve served for over a decade as a councilwoman in Efrat, where she and her physician husband raised 7 children.


Thank you so much for joining us Eve! Can you tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

I moved to Israel from Los Angeles in 1988, married with 3 kids and a graduate degree in psychology. I was initially content just to live out the love I felt for the country since I first stepped foot here as an 8-year-old. I soon felt the disconnect between the reality I was living and what the world was hearing via the nascent Internet and decided to get the truth out. Ten years ago, after years of Israel advocacy work and becoming a radio interviewer, (all while raising our seven children) I became a licensed tour guide. Combining all my education and experiences, I have created a unique niche where I connect people who visit Israel to world history, Bible and this country’s outsize role in current events and phenomenal cuisine. I’m also able to influence globally via my weekly podcast ‘Rejuvenation’ and my speaking tours outside the Middle East.

In addition, I find it particularly gratifying to work with One Israel Fund as their Director of Tourism. Being able to work with One Israel Fund and people who live and breathe Israel and the well-being of her residents no matter their opinions or affiliations, especially in these very polarized times, is not something I take for granted.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you began leading your company?

We took a bus trip to one of the isolated Jewish farms in the Jordan Valley a few years ago. The Jordan Valley is on the eastern border between Israel and Jordan. One of the teenage boys on our trip was so enamored with the couple running the farm and their steadfastness and willingness to put up with the intense heat in order to help maintain a strategic presence for Israel along this border, that he ended up returning and volunteering with them on the farm for a few months. That led to his joining the IDF, making Aliyah (making his residence in Israel), getting married in Israel and establishing a family. You just never know what will happen when you open a door.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

In the ’90’s I was elected to my town’s local council for a decade, while my Hebrew was still a work in progress. Who knew that the words for ‘compromise’ and ‘undress’ were so similar? I found out in a meeting when, instead of saying “let’s get together”, I pretty much said “Let’s get naked”! It was good to give the Israelis a laugh, and that’s not the only time something like this has happened. My Hebrew is a lot better now but moving to a completely foreign country is quite challenging on many levels. You have to have a good sense of humor and a lot of patience with yourself.

Can you describe how you or your organization is making a significant social impact?

One Israel Fund, the organization for which I act as Director of Tourism, is devoted to making up budgetary shortfalls and giving services and security to Jewish villages in Judea and Samaria. It gives me great pride to tour with busloads of people throughout the year to these communities to see the impact of One Israel Fund’s projects and meet the residents. It also helps dispel the untruths and even demonization of ‘settlers’ that’s found in the international press.

Each new playground, community center, library, ambulance, synagogue and emergency medical kit enables the residents to live a higher quality life. Each piece of security equipment donated by One Israel Fund has had a dramatic effect on the safety and security of these families. Bringing Jews and Christians from abroad to see these areas, connect with the rich history that combines the Bible with world events and look to a vibrant future- well, this is particularly gratifying to me.

Wow! Can you tell me a story about a particular individual who has impacted this cause?

Marc Provisor has been the director of security projects for One Israel Fund since 2008. Marc has a very eclectic background which would take too much time to map out in this format but, suffice to say, he is one of, if not the greatest expert in counter-terror efforts specific to the communities of Judea and Samaria today. Marc is an accomplished artist but in 1996, the mayor of his hometown in Shiloh convinced Marc to become the head of security — known as a RavShatz. As a civilian security chief, he was responsible for the coordination of all security matters pertaining to his community and the areas surrounding it. As many of your readers will remember, this was right around the time when bus bombings and drive-by-shootings were just beginning.

By the time the Oslo War -Intifada began in September of 2000, Marc was responding to terror incidents on a daily basis.

The knowledge he gained during that turbulent decade has proven to be indispensable to One Israel Fund’s increased efforts to provide lifesaving security equipment to the communities throughout Judea and Samaria in addition to areas along the Gaza border in the south. Under Marc’s leadership, One Israel Fund has become the premier organization in performing threat analyses and designing plans to protect each area. Together with the IDF, the communities themselves have become much more adept at protecting themselves from would-be attackers. One Israel Fund only donates preventive security equipment to the communities such as thermal camera systems, improved communication equipment, high powered lighting and the like. Each of these pieces of equipment have saved lives and I love bringing people to meet with the leaders of communities and watching their faces when they learn about all One Israel Fund is doing to protect and secure these areas. No one plays a greater role in this arena than Marc.

How do you define “Leadership”? Can you explain what you mean or give an example?

Part of being a good leader is acknowledging mistakes. Continuing down a path that’s proven wrong, because ego or fear keeps you from assuming responsibility to change the situation is a sign of weakness, not strength and leadership. One of the things I love about the Bible is it teaches lessons about the importance of leadership. There’s no human-drama- life-messy relationships-stupid mistakes-tribal warfare and lustful inclination that is not mentioned in the Holy Book. We are real, flawed human beings and nothing is covered up. But we pick ourselves up and move along. I draw such inspiration from that, again, on both a personal and national level.

Also, allowing others to shine and knowing how to delegate to each person or sector to make the most of their skills. Not everyone makes a good soldier, for example, (a divisive issue in Israel) so funnel each group into what they do best so that your society/company/family is more than the sum of its parts.

A good leader knows how to seize a moment that may not return. For example, David Ben Gurion declaring the State of Israel on May 14th, 1948. Even the U.S. had rescinded support for the partition plan because President Truman thought that the newly born Jewish country wouldn’t survive. It was a huge moment and Ben Gurion didn’t let it pass.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  • Don’t compare yourself to anyone else. There’s always someone richer, prettier, thinner, smarter. (High school is torture for girls). Just excel at what you can, drop what is unnecessary and appreciate your uniqueness and the role you need to play in the world.
  • Don’t let your fears control you. I’ve spent my 50’s pushing WAY out of my comfort zone. To end my fear of heights I zip lined over the rain forest in Costa Rica. I learned to scuba dive in Thailand, went white water rafting in Montenegro and last summer jumped out of a plane in Israel at 14,000 feet. (50 second free fall!). It was exhilarating. The best feeling is to overcome your fears. Don’t wait like I did.
  • Most people get in their own way and blame others. Don’t be a victim. The tough things that happen to you are where growth happens too. Use the experiences to become more empathic, less judgmental and let it spur you to help others who perhaps didn’t have the coping mechanisms and/or faith to get through it. Blaming others gives them control. Take it back.
  • I was painfully insecure and shaken when I spoke to more than 5 people. I’m now a public speaker and appear in front of hundreds. When you have a message, a goal, a passion, let that help you move past the challenges. It’s awesome.
  • Life is not a popularity contest! You need to be true to yourself, earn respect and have a few close friends and family who love you for you. The rest is Facebook fantasy.
  • Spend more time with your kids when they’re little and less time cleaning up. Those years fly by…

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I try to strike a balance between understanding that what I say can inspire and affect people tremendously and acknowledging how small and insignificant I am in the scope of humanity. We all need to see that life has meaning, even, or maybe especially, the difficult parts, and be grateful for what we have. I can’t live without the Sabbath, Shabbat, and this isn’t a new idea. Carve out a time without the phone and computer, go offline and then online with the people you love around you. It’s truly the greatest gift we were given, to emulate our Creator by knocking off our ‘work’ and returning to ourselves, whatever that means. It’s a rebalance, and a real Shabbat is a piece of heaven.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

The Serenity prayer: “God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

I wasted too much time trying to change situations and other people. Now I found the courage and finally, with the years, the wisdom and I’m so glad to be able to share it with others.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

The Dalai Lama. Spiritual people fascinate me, and I’d like to hear how he sees God’s love and presence in a world often wracked with wars in His name.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

I am on Facebook, twitter, Instagram and of course my podcast Rejuvenation: www.eveharow.com

@eveharow

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