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Private Investigator and Breaking Homicide Star Derrick Levasseur: “I would like to see law enforcement and community members come together and have constructive conversations on how to improve our relationships”

As someone who has a voice, I would like to see law enforcement and community members come together and have constructive conversations on how to improve our relationships. Times are tough right now and we need to come together to make our society whole again. I had the pleasure to interview Derrick Levasseur from Investigation Discovery’s […]


As someone who has a voice, I would like to see law enforcement and community members come together and have constructive conversations on how to improve our relationships. Times are tough right now and we need to come together to make our society whole again.


I had the pleasure to interview Derrick Levasseur from Investigation Discovery’s BREAKING HOMICIDE. Derrick Levasseur is a retired police sergeant and licensed private investigator from Central Falls, Rhode Island. During his time in law enforcement, Derrick has worked in both the Patrol Division and the Detective Division, investigating a wide-range of crimes. He also spent three years as an undercover detective with the Special Investigations Unit. In addition to his experience in the field, he has advanced training in crime scene analysis, undercover operations, and interview and interrogation tactics. Over the course of his career, Derrick has received multiple awards, including the Medal of Valor, which is the highest honor a police officer can receive. Derrick currently serves as CEO of “Break Investigative Group” — a successful private investigation and consulting firm located in Rhode Island. His hit series, BREAKING HOMICIDE premieres this Monday, June 3 at 10/9c on Investigation Discovery.


Thank you so much for doing this with us Derrick! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

I grew up in the city where I eventually became a police officer at the age of twenty. I was one of four children and my parents worked hard to make sure we never went without, but as with many large families, we didn’t always have the best of everything. In the end, that was a good thing because it taught me to appreciate what I do have and to work hard for what I want.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

The city I grew up in was pretty economically deprived. I saw a lot of people struggle, including some of my own family and friends. I also saw a lot of crime. As a kid, there wasn’t much I could do about it. But as I got older, I knew I wanted to do something to change it. So I decided to enter a career that would allow me to protect those who couldn’t protect themselves.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

I wouldn’t necessarily refer to it as “interesting,” but I was involved in a fatal shooting as an officer at the age of 23. It was one of the most difficult times in my life, but it taught me a lot about myself and what I was mentally capable of. It also gave me a new appreciation on life — It can be taken from you in a second. So you have to enjoy your time while you have it.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

As of right now, my focus is my private investigation firm, Break Investigative Group, and the cases I am currently working, which includes the cases featured on this season of ‘Breaking Homicide.’

What are your “3 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Treat everyone you meet on the job with respect, even criminals. I can’t tell you how many cases I’ve solved after receiving information from someone I had arrested in the past but treated fairly. They remember. Trust me.
  2. Be prepared for anything. You think you know what you’re getting into, but everyday as a police officer is different from the previous day. Don’t become complacent. When I was in patrol, one minute I would be taking an accident report, and the next minute I was in a high-speed chase with a robbery suspect.
  3. Stay objective when working a case, but treat the investigation as if the victim was your family member or friend. There were many times when I was tired or burnt out, but what got me through it was thinking about the families that were counting on me. That’s what kept me motivated.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

Remember how hard you worked to become a police officer. Remember what made you want to become an officer in the first place. Remember the feeling you had when you first put on that uniform. The job isn’t always easy, but it’s an honor and a privilege to wear the uniform. Don’t forget it.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

As someone who has a voice, I would like to see law enforcement and community members come together and have constructive conversations on how to improve our relationships. Times are tough right now and we need to come together to make our society whole again.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

Dream as if you’ll live forever. Live as if you’ll die today — James Dean

This is pretty self-explanatory. Go for your dreams and don’t wait. Now is as good of a time as ever.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

Elon Musk. He’s not in my field at all, but I love his drive and determination and I think he’s brilliant. And regardless of what we talked about, I’m pretty sure it would be interesting if it came from him. Who knows — maybe we can develop the first electric police car? Make our officers safer and protect the environment at the same time.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

Twitter; @DerrickL

Instagram: @DerrickLevasseur

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