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Perception as a Psychotherapist

As a psychotherapist I have been perceived as being “Perfect” problem solver, and having a lovely life. Which is a false perception, a heavy load to carry and it is further from the truth, as we are human beings too. We have emotions and thoughts and have many struggles, that we would like to share […]

As a psychotherapist I have been perceived as being “Perfect” problem solver, and having a lovely life. Which is a false perception, a heavy load to carry and it is further from the truth, as we are human beings too. We have emotions and thoughts and have many struggles, that we would like to share in a safe environment without being ostracizes or criticize. I often hear from family, some friends and loved ones “you are the therapist you should have all the answers, no problems and never feel like that…” I can’t speak for everyone who is in the helping profession, but my God it is hard NOT to feel empty and alone. It really destroys the soul and in the attempt to feel better about ones self/life – many times we cope in unhealthy ways in which we know it is not good for us, but we do it anyways. These unhealthy ways of coping leave us feeling guilty, ashamed, depressed, anxious and lonely. I want to be able to be happy (like everyone else) and I doubt I am the only one who feels/thinks this way, as many times I have provided counseling or seeing helping professionals in psychotherapy who feel the same. As helping professionals we need to talk about hard topics that makes us feel uncomfortable as we are humans who need empathy and the need to connect with others without feeling labeled.

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