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Paula Lauzon: “Let us put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children”

There is no such thing as the word ‘can’t’ in my vocabulary. I am extremely driven and don’t take ‘no’ for an answer. You seriously need to have thick skin to be in this industry. You must be driven. You need to be business oriented as well and realize that you are the CEO of […]

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There is no such thing as the word ‘can’t’ in my vocabulary. I am extremely driven and don’t take ‘no’ for an answer. You seriously need to have thick skin to be in this industry. You must be driven. You need to be business oriented as well and realize that you are the CEO of your company. YOU are the company. Keep your mouth closed and your ears open. Bring your a-game to the audition; win the audition room, respect everyone in the room, and LEAVE the audition in the room; move onto the next one; and STAY outta your head!


As a part of our series about Inspirational Women in Hollywood, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Paula Lauzon. She is an Actor, Director, Executive Producer, Producer as well as a Casting Director.

Paula Lauzon was born Maria Paula Lauzon, in Fall River, Massachusetts, USA. Her Mother is the late Maria A. Lauzon, born in Relva, Sao Miguel Island (homemaker/seamstress) and her father is the late Paul M. Lauzon, born in Fall River MA (a former U.S. Postal Worker).

Paula’s love of acting and film was instilled by her parents, Maria and Paul, whose passion for film ranged from Spaghetti Westerns to classic horror, suspense, musicals, and iconic films like Casablanca, The Wizard of Oz, The Sound of Music, and King Kong.

Inspired by classic Hollywood icons Myrna Loy and Lucille Ball, Paula cut her acting teeth in community theatre, appearing in The Little Theatre of Fall River productions of Titanic: The Musical, Jesus Christ Superstar, and Oklahoma!

Paula honed her craft through Master Acting Classes with former Days of Our Lives star, Steve Blackwood, and continued acting in local theatre and music video, including The Portuguese Kids, ‘Thrift Shop Parody’. In 2015, she made the leap to commercial work, and quickly became recognized as a diverse character actress both in film and on television shows such as A&E’s Cold Case, the Oxygen True Crime Stories, and Murder Book Mystery and Lifetime Movie Network’s comedic episodic series MY CRAZY SEX.

She can be seen in a variety of national ads from Lyrica (print ad), as well as TV/video ads. Her face has become quite familiar in Ring’s, ‘Secure Mani/Pedi’ Commercial, Jardiance, Glucerna, and Chase.

She’s had roles in student films and short films, all of which have been submitted and won various awards at Film Festivals around the Country. She has also had roles in Unusual Suspects, Murder Book Mystery, VETTv, Deadline: Crime with Tamron Hall, and can be seen in many more various television shows and movies.

She has taken classes at various schools in Burbank, and briefly studied with Anthony Montes. She was also tutored by the well-regarded Brionne Davis.

Since her arrival in North Carolina in July 2019, she has opened The Durham School of Acting as well as her production company, HarLau Productions. She splits her time between LA and NC. She is in early-stage development of her film, ‘Inimicus’; she has a private investor for this stage and has hired a consultant as well as a writer to expand on the short film screenplay that she’s in possession of as well as cast.

HarLau Productions’ mission statement is to develop, finance, produce and distribute Feature Films and Short Films, including Web Series, that deal in various genres. This will be done by purchasing screenplays from writers around the country and possibly the globe. Being a professional writer is not just a moniker but something that is earned. Writers are very good at their craft and she intends to have their stories told.

HarLau Productions’ aim is to ensure that its films are viewed by mass market global audiences and return profits to the film’s investors and all its profit participants. Lauzon’s intentions are to be working on films that not only offer entertainment to the viewing audience but that also have a purposeful mission.

As well, she has more screenplays in the pipeline with development funding as it’s available. The process is extremely slow right now because of the events transpiring in our nation but she keeps busy with advancement of screenplays and script reading to make her selections appropriately that align with her production company’s mission statement.

A Member of the Television Academy, Paula has been judging in the Burbank International Film Festival, The Raleigh Film and Art Festival and The 47th Annual Daytime Emmy® Awards for ©The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to get to know you a bit better. Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

I typically don’t discuss that part of my life because I’d found it quite embarrassing but as the years have gone on I’ve learned it’s okay to be open about some of it. Both my parents were alcoholics. My mother more so than my father. I remember the good times but there was also a lot of rough times. My father was the breadwinner in the house, working two jobs and taking care of us as best as he possibly could. After my mother lost her battle with alcoholism in 1984 at the age of 41 (I was 14), I believe that he suffered an emotional meltdown. It was very distressing for me to watch him go through that and I’d felt that it was my fault that they drank as much as they did. In school, I attempted to fit in with the other kids in a predominant Irish and Jewish suburb of Boston and that just wasn’t going to happen. Things turned around immensely for me when I entered High School after moving to Fall River MA. My peers there were much more friendly, compassionate and nonjudgmental. So, in answer to this question, it was difficult.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

I had begun my relationship with the Little Theatre of Fall River (LTFR) Company, by being part of the Ensemble Cast of Jesus Christ Superstar and Titanic-The Musical. After some time, I eventually became known for my role as “Aunt Eller” at the Little Theatre of Fall River’s production of R&H’s Oklahoma. My final stint with the LTFR was in the production of Monty Python’s Spamalot, where I was joined by my son, Jacob. It was during this final production, that I began doing “extra” work for a variety of films and commercials, in Boston and NYC.

Eventually, I broke in to both nationally and internationally known music videos such as, The Portuguese Kids, Thrift Shop Parody, King Lil G’s, Cold Christmas, Franz Ferdinand’s, Feel the Love, Oliver Tree’s, Miracle Man and Trisha Paytas’, What Dreams Are Made Of.

I have had roles in student films and short films, all of which have been submitted and won various awards at Film Festivals around the Country. I have also had roles in Unusual Suspects, Murder Book Mystery, VETTv, Deadline: Crime with Tamron Hall, and can be seen in many more various television shows and movies.

My journey of moving out to Los Angeles is good one: Armed with a dream and a vivacious personality, I had done something most middle-aged adults would find frightening and probably crazy; I have proven that taking chances is not just for 20-somethings. While still living back East, I had attended master classes with Steve Blackwood, former Bart Biederbecke, of Days of Our Lives. After approximately a year’s worth of classes, he had told me that there was nothing more he could teach me that I didn’t know and that I should head to LA. With my son’s blessing, I followed his advice. I sold or gave away what I could, packed what little was left over, into my car, and drove myself across the Country. I arrived in Los Angeles with 40 dollars in my pocket, and with the help of some very close friends, I have been able to accomplish my dream of becoming a working actress.

I had taken classes at various schools in Burbank. I very briefly studied with Anthony Montes and was also tutored by the well-regarded Brionne Davis.

Now that I’m bank on the East Coast, I love getting to the beach, because the Atlantic is my first love, as well as the seafood.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

What I can say is that I’ve had the best opportunities to work with some very nice A-List Actors; Richard Cabral (from Mayans MC), Michael Pare’, (I was a background actor on the set of ‘Traded, directed by Timothy Woodward, Jr., who’s work I absolutely love), Don Cheadle, Kristen Bell, John Stamos, Mary Steenburgen, Patrick Stewart; getting to meet and speak with John Blyth Barrymore (Drew’s brother), Claire Foy (she was just beautiful and down to earth), Kim Estes, Kate Linder, Patrika Darbo. There’s just so many. I’ve passed actors in stores, nodded to them and kept walking. I feel for me the most interesting story is being in a town where I never thought I’d be and here I am in the same market as an actor I’ve seen in movies and television.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

Gosh, I make mistakes every day; we all do. What I can tell you is that I’m a ‘set clown’. Growing up I’d always been silly in school; I absolutely suck at telling jokes but my sarcasm tends to leak out at times. After fifty (50) years you’d think I’d have it under control. Nope, diarrhea of the mouth. As soon as I open my mouth, everyone’s asking me where in New York I’m from. I’m not. I’m from Boston. My dialect is a mix of Boston and SE Massachusetts. I’m not sure why people love it and I’m still asked to ‘pahk the cah in the yahd’. (Do people do this to Adam Sandler and Donnie Wahlberg?) There’ve also been times that I was given the nickname ‘Boston’ on set because it was the easiest way for them to remember and refer to me. I felt that that was always fun.

None of us can achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

I’ll begin by stating that my son is my number one fan, (he just made twenty-four (24 in August), and when it came time to ‘make the leap’ to LA, he held my face in his hands and told me that I needed to do me and ‘go big or go home’. He has been my cheerleader as well as my voice of reason. In the early stage of my career, I would run all types of projects by him that I’d been offered. I can remember at one point there was a reality show on the table. He told me not to do it and that if I did that it’d make my career go sideways. It’s funny now but at the time he was serious. He’s such an old soul and I absolutely love him. Someone that has helped me over the last eleven (11) years, which feels like I’ve known him all my life is a gentleman by the name of Stan Forczek; Stan is now a CEO/Consultant; Advocate, Speaker and Advisory Board Chair for the National Infrastructure Bank Legislation. We met through LinkedIn when I was in the Energy and Utilities Industry in September, 2009, after I’d asked a question in a forum on the platform; he called me to answer my question and since then, we’ve maintained a strong business relationship but more-so an extremely invaluable friendship. He has offered me guidance on many, many projects over the years as well as how to handle myself as a businesswoman and grow in the Corporate Sector. While he always tells me I’m his hero I feel that it’s his ability to convey a message to myself on the ins and outs of Corporate life that I have been able to succeed in the Entertainment Industry. I feel that he has been a great mentor to me, and I feel that he is an asset no matter where he is in his career. Another individual that I would like to thank is Mr. Steve Blackwood. For eleven (11) years, Steve played the role of ‘Bart Beiderbecke’ on ‘Days of Our Lives’. He was Stefano DeMera’s henchman. Steve was a key figure at a time in my life where I was working through a staffing agency barely making ends meet. I would scrape together money that I may have had, in order to take his classes each week or when I could and drive an hour to an hour and a half sometimes to take his Acting Classes either west of or north of Boston. (he held his classes in two (2) different locations at the time). I was terrified to be in his presence, in his class amidst creatives that knew way more than what I felt was more than I did but Steve as well as my classmates cheered me on. This man truly believed in me and told me after close to a year of taking his classes that there was no more that he could teach me that I didn’t already know. He said that I needed to go to LA and start working as an actor. He and a good friend of his, Teresa Spaulding who was also studying with him and is a terrific actor told me I was ready, and it was time. I was floored and couldn’t believe it. I went home that night and planned what I needed to do and executed it in less than five (5) months. It happened that fast. I secured a talent agent and left the following April 2015. I didn’t know where I was going to live or what job I would have but I knew that I needed to go. I had never felt calmer about making decisions and smart choices in my life except for having my son than being able to take Steve’s advice and making a decision that changed my life as well as my son’s life. The next individual I’d like to offer a special thank you to is Brionne Davis. He is an actor, a well-regarded acting teacher and is a dear friend and mentor in my life. He teaches a Cold-Read class on Saturdays at the Anthony Gilardi Acting Studio Online. Brionne saw something in me and believed in me when I was a student in his class. While I had a difficult time coming up with money for his classes as well, he allowed me to explore the craft. He offers great feedback in his classes. He serves as a mentor and teacher in his community and he is committed to his students in the work that he puts into his classes and private sessions. He was and still is a huge influence in my life.

There have also been many very close friends of mine, since I arrived in Hollywood in 2015 where I needed to put my pride aside and ask for help in certain aspects of my career as well as my personal life. Without these individuals who I can’t name but they know who they are, I can tell you I would be sleeping in a van down by the river. I feel that I have come such a long way in a short amount of time and am extremely happy with what I’ve accomplished and what I will be achieving in the very near future.

You have been blessed with great success in a career path that can be challenging. Do you have any words of advice for others who may want to embark on this career path, but seem daunted by the prospect of failure?

There is no such thing as the word ‘can’t’ in my vocabulary. I am extremely driven and don’t take ‘no’ for an answer. You seriously need to have thick skin to be in this industry. You must be driven. You need to be business oriented as well and realize that you are the CEO of your company. YOU are the company. Keep your mouth closed and your ears open. Bring your a-game to the audition; win the audition room, respect everyone in the room, and LEAVE the audition in the room; move onto the next one; and STAY outta your head!

What drives you to get up every day and work in TV and Film? What change do you want to see in the industry going forward?

It took all my life to place myself in a position that when I cast my net out that what I wanted would come back to me and I would not only reap the benefits but I also ensure that my team reaps those benefits as well. When I talk I about ‘my team’, I mean my agents, managers, and many close friends that I know I can trust. Since before and after my arrival in Hollywood I had spent a better part of my time introducing myself to MANY people in the Entertainment Industry utilizing my LinkedIn Profile which is a social media business platform. This took time, LOTS of time and I’d had lots of it. Since 2019, I had taken up residency in Durham NC, after residing in LA from 2015–2019. LA is where I built my foundation in the acting industry and had made the appropriate connections after relocating from the Greater Boston/Southeastern Massachusetts Area. (this entailed driving myself across the country and arriving there after a two (2) week stop in Dallas with 40 dollars bucks in my pocket). I have always been and continue to be open to new castings, auditions and meet-ups, including collaborations in and on projects, in roles that I fit as well as Directing and Producing which I’ve taken a love to so that I could continue to build close relationships with other Creatives in this Industry that I’ve been passionate about for so long with the intentions of giving back to my community along with paying it forward. I have ensured that I am represented by Acting Talent Agent’s in the LA/NYC/ATL/SE Region markets at present and am continuing to audition several times a month for roles that fit my appearance, etc. Since my arrival in North Carolina in July 2019, I have opened my acting studio, The Durham School of Acting as well as my production company, HarLau Productions. I am also a casting director and have cast several projects since being in NC. I feel another strength that I have is a good eye for talent.

While it’s only been five (5) years, this took a lot of time and effort not just on my behalf but also other individuals that were willing to open up the discussion with me and of course my constant research through articles, websites and books. I feel that if you don’t have a thick skin to be in this industry, you really are not going to survive. My upbringing and background have a LOT to do with this which is why I am where I am right now in my career.

You have such impressive work. What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now? Where do you see yourself heading from here?

I really appreciate you mentioning this. With my perseverance and determination, I find myself continuing to move ahead in this Industry that women such as myself continue to strive to find a place for ourselves. For me I see through the windshield that is big; the rear-view mirror is small and behind me and I don’t look back, ever. I continue to manifest and see so many great things happening for me in the very near future.

I split my time between LA and NC. Right now, I’m in the development stage of my film, ‘Inimicus’. This feature film is about a former soldier who has struggled to reintegrate into normal life after several tours of duty overseas. Despite his best efforts, his inner demons take center stage as his wife and friends try desperately to keep his PTSD from consuming his life. “Inimicus” shines a light on the very real trauma that so many of our military veterans which return from the battlefield face daily. This film offers a platform to bring this very serious issue to the screen. I am bringing awareness to the signs of PTSD and that there is help available as well as enabling the sufferers the knowledge of what tools are available for them. Family and friends of veterans will be able to see and understand their loved ones in this film. I have a private investor for this stage and have hired a consultant and screenplay writer to expand on the short film screenplay that I’m in possession of. This was my first acquisition in opening my production company. I am also seeking investors/financing to produce my film(s). HarLau Productions’ mission statement is to develop, finance, produce and distribute Feature Films and Short Films, including Web Series, that deal in various genres. This will be done by purchasing screenplays from writers around the country and possibly the globe. Writers are very good at their craft and I intend to have their stories told. HarLau Productions’ aim is to ensure that its films are viewed by mass market global audiences and to return profits to the film’s investors and all its profit participants. My intention is to be working on films that not only offer entertainment to the viewing audience but that also have a purposeful mission. As well, I have more screenplays in the pipeline with development funding, as it’s available. The process is extremely slow right now, because of the events transpiring in our nation, but I am keeping busy with advancement of screenplays and script reading to make my selections appropriately that align with my production company’s mission. I am also Executive Producing a Feature Film with a 6.5MM dollars budget with a production company located in Utah; I have been fortunate enough to have private investors in my projects; they believe in me as well as my mission statement. I feel it is key and paramount to ensure that my crew and talent are paid for their time and effort to assist with my projects that I feel have meat on the bone.

We are very interested in looking at diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture and our youth growing up today?

My approach to this question is an opinion of mine only. I recently watched a Ted Talk featuring Jon M. Chu, ‘Crazy Rich Asians’. He was given the tools that he needed by his parents, when he was young and learned that he LOVED being a filmmaker and enrolled in USC where Steven Spielberg discovered his early work. With his perseverance and determination he paved his way and that for others in Hollywood.

Now, I’m unsure whether people realize the effect that Mary Pickford had on Film. She was a film actress as well as producer with a career that spanned fifty (50) years. Mary was one of the Canadian pioneers in early Hollywood as well as a significant figure in the development of film acting. She was also one of the earliest stars to be billed under her own name. (Very difficult to do in the early years of Hollywood). She was a co-founder of the Pickford–Fairbanks Studios with Douglas Fairbanks and the United Artists studio with Fairbanks, Charlie Chaplin, and D. W. Griffith, AND she was one of the 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. She received an Academy Honorary Award in 1976 for her contributions to the American cinema.

As well, in the first decades of the twentieth century, FIVE (5), African American women filmmakers helped to establish the US cinema industry and to better the representation of African Americans on film. These women came from Kansas City, Missouri, Montclair, New Jersey, and Washington DC. Even though they were geographically separated they were united by a belief that the motion picture was socially transformative. These women wanted to present to the public, the life of African Americans that they felt, was authentic. Believe it or not, these women WERE entrepreneurial. They alone arranged theatrical exhibitions as well as distributions of their film prints directly to the audiences just so that they could reach more communities.

While there were African American giants in the industry there were also women that were involved in their husband’s creative teamwork; Alice B. Russell and Eslanda Robeson, were just two (2).

Early Asian American actors such as Sessue Hayakawa, Anna May Wong, and Bruce Lee encountered a movie-making culture and industry that wanted to cast them as caricatures. Some, such as actress Merle Oberon, hid their ethnicity to avoid discrimination by Hollywood’s racist laws. Hayakawa, one of the biggest stars in Hollywood during the silent film era of the 1910s and early 1920s, was the first actor of Asian descent to achieve stardom as a leading man in the United States and Europe. I could go on. Diversity? If it’s not there it’s because it waned. The actors from the early movie days paved a path for actors from all races and genders. It’s up to ALL of us to ensure that that door always remains OPEN and to safeguard it so that they can continue to tell their stories and make their voices heard as they did when the early actors began in this business all those years ago.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

If I’d come into this field well over thirty (30) years ago, I’m sure I would’ve failed. I determined that when I made the jump into this industry, that I had the tools that I needed to thrive. Being a middle-aged woman with well over thirty (30) years of corporate experience under my belt, I’d worked as a legal assistant and later as an administrator and business developer. Working in the legal field taught me critical problem solving and fast paced decision making as well as the value of intensive research. This has helped me immensely in learning to navigate the film world; knowing where to look for my answers, who to talk to, what events are paramount for me to be a part of. Working in business development taught me analytics. This taught me how to observe and adapt in the field and how to gauge potential. I feel that these skills have proved invaluable in my work in the film industry.

Can you share with our readers any self-care routines, practices or treatments that you do to help your body, mind or heart to thrive? Please share a story for each one if you can.

I don’t really have any ‘self-care’ routines at the moment. I mean, I grew up on ethnic foods in our home, consisting of fish, carbs, olive oil and LOTS of garlic. Eating healthy has ALWAYS been a challenge for me. I attempt to choose well, don’t drink in excess, (I love my gin and tonics, bourbons, white and red wines), I smoke but not a pack a day for sure. Exercise?? phhhht. I’m lucky I can get out and walk our dog the mile I may do on occasion and I know that that’s bad but honestly? I’m not looking to impress anyone. I’m content that I can wake up in the morning and as soon as my feet hit the floor, the devil says, ‘Uh oh, she’s up’.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Let us put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children.”, Sitting Bull.

My father loved History and that of the Native Americans. He knew so much about them and specifically felt a pull towards Sitting Bull; he taught me about him when I was little. This quote resonates with me because the prior generation always wants more for their children. My father wanted more for me; I want the same for my son. It certainly does take a village to be raised and to raise our own children. It is up to me to ensure that I can supply the tools that I feel my son may need to navigate this life of ours. He in turn will do that and more for his children, and grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

You are a person of huge influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be?

I am flattered that you feel that. I like to believe that I’m a person OF influence and many people have mentioned to me how inspirational I am to them, but how influential I am, only time will tell.

I don’t have just one answer for this because I’m the type of person who’s on the constant move about what I can do to make an impact in the industry no matter how big or small. I don’t do anything to be vainglorious. I appreciate how good it makes me feel and I find it extremely calming for me. I feel that compassion, love, education, stewardship and support are key factors in being meaningful, for me anyways. Being giving and receiving of support no matter what a person wants to do with their life. Allow your children to do what fuels their soul and feeds the fire in their bellies. You’d be surprised at how liberating this is for them and how empowered they feel. Learning and understanding right from wrong. Allowing our children to make their own choices and when they’re the wrong ones, allow them to learn to make the right choices. Be respective of your elders. (this is SO key and paramount). Learn about and understand history. Be enthusiastic about what you want to do and the impact that you want to make. Educate yourself. Read.

Is there a person in the world whom you would love to have lunch with, and why? Maybe we can tag them and see what happens!

This answer is three-fold:

First and foremost, would be to have lunch with my father. My father passed away on October 31, 2018, while I was watching one of our favourite movies, ‘House of Wax’, with Vincent Price. I was living in CA and my father was living in NC. We had not seen each other for well over twenty (20) years. We had a slightly estranged relationship, if that term is even possible to use. Years had gone by when he left MA, before we began writing each other and speaking on the phone. When I arrived in CA in 2015, I’d not told him that I was moving there for my career until we spoke on the phone weeks after I’d arrived. I could hear in this voice his pride and happiness. He wanted to learn all about my adventures and we’d speak every day on the phone for close to two (2) weeks straight. For me this was a turning point in my life, about forgiveness for the choices that he made as well as myself. Towards the end of his life, he’d been in and out of the hospital, on and off a ventilator to help him breathe and he was so tired of it and the doctor and I spoke about the best course of action for him. I didn’t want to be selfish about the possibility of seeing him again, let alone hugging him, which I hadn’t done if forever, and I needed to allow him to no longer suffer and pass on with his dignity. That last weekend, he’d gone back to the Assisted Living Care facility and passed peacefully, with what I learned later, a smile on his face. He came into this world with nothing and left with his dignity. We had always told each other we loved each other at the end of our conversations but we never said ‘goodbye’. He never let me say that. He would end our conversation with until next time.

The second person I’d love to have lunch with is Clint Eastwood. My father taught me about him and his films, specifically his Spaghetti Westerns. I’d spent a better part of my life and more recently learning more about him; his acting, his directing. I would absolutely LOVE to shadow that man on set as he is directing. I would really like to be able to sit with him for a while and pick his brain about the Industry back then and now.

The third person is Sophia Loren. I found her also to be a very big influence in my life. My mother was from the old country and followed her for years in her films. When my mother was not under the influence, she would dress to the nines like her, style her hair like her, do her makeup very close to hers. I learned a lot about that from her when I was young. I would absolutely love to sit with Ms. Loren and talk to her about the industry back then and now as well asking her about hers and it’s impact on her impact on people such as myself and my mother.

Are you on social media? How can our readers follow you online?

They can go to my website: https://www.paulalauzon.com/

In the upper left-hand corner are links to my social media platforms where they can connect with me, etc.

This was so informative, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!

Thank you so much for offering me your platform to introduce myself. I really enjoyed this and thank you for your well-wishes.

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