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Paul Peros of REDUIT: “If the head is empty, the head doesn’t matter”

Virtually all the quotes from Dickie Fox in the Jerry Maguire movie. From “I love getting up in the mornings, I clap my hands and say, ‘This is going to be a great day!”, to “If the head is empty, the head doesn’t matter”, and most importantly “I don’t have all the answers. In life, […]

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Virtually all the quotes from Dickie Fox in the Jerry Maguire movie. From “I love getting up in the mornings, I clap my hands and say, ‘This is going to be a great day!”, to “If the head is empty, the head doesn’t matter”, and most importantly “I don’t have all the answers. In life, to be honest, I have failed as much as I have succeeded. But I love my wife. I love my life. And I wish you my kind of success.” It is not just their simplicity, but the responsible and proactive direction of these that I enjoy remembering for years now.


As a part of our series about business leaders who are shaking things up in their industry, I had the pleasure of interviewing Paul Peros.

For over 30 years, Paul has been residing around the world implementing growth orientated performance strategies and technological advancements and innovation designed to disrupt industries and take brands and businesses to global dominance and to the next level of consumerism for an ever changing world and the ‘new normal’. Paul’s current role, and his brainchild, RÉDUIT was created in Neuchâtel in 2019. The brand is part of the portfolio of WELLFULLY Limited, the Perth-based high-tech company whose proprietary enhanced delivery innovation technologies are at the core of RÉDUIT’s precision beauty systems.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Before we dig in, our readers would like to get to know you a bit more. Can you tell us a bit about your “backstory”? What led you to this particular career path?

Prior to beauty and beauty tech, I spent over 10 years in management consulting, mainly working on new product development. Being a part of GEA, a “pre-McKinseyan”, small strategy boutique in Milano, where we:

  1. Had a very typical Italian, product-oriented client pool of entrepreneurs and family business, many of which were global leaders in their respective segments, from Leonardo Del Vecchio (Luxottica) and Oscar Farinetti (Eataly), to Vittorio Merloni (Indesit) and Giuseppe Rana (Rana) these were leaders that truly innovated in their industries
  2. Had to make do without the benefit of industry practices, common to the large multinational consultancies — and the related R&D support, we relied on collaborations with business schools and research of the likes of HBS, MIT Sloan, IMD, and INSEAD. Also free of the burden of industry practices, not having to re-sell the same content to all the players in the industry, we were able to design truly unique strategies that made a difference oftentimes arriving to never-before-seen results.

I was lucky to have had the opportunity to design and execute development strategies in FOREO and REDUIT in a very similar way, fitting product and organizational development solutions to a very specific context with the aim of creating unique solutions. I hope that I will be able to continue doing this in the future.

Can you tell our readers what it is about the work you’re doing that’s disruptive?

We are in constant search of true and meaningful innovation. True in the sense that it is not just incremental, without compromises and addressing every single design dimension. Meaningful in the sense that it addresses real concerns of consumers and provides for relevant improvements.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

It was probably the wrong assumption, or the equating of Skinpods and Hairpods to primary packaging in traditional beauty. The REDUIT pods are incomparably more complex with electronics, active diffusion and structural elements not found in any comparable product. The engineering hours are testament to that, as well as numerous episodes we had along the way oftentimes discovering system properties by chance by, for example, using a product on a plane. The key learning was — the importance of learning itself. We even adjusted the organization and our processes to make sure we maximize the exploration of “unexpected phenomena” when designing things that nobody had ever done before.

We all need a little help along the journey. Who have been some of your mentors? Can you share a story about how they made an impact?

I was fortunate to always have had extraordinary mentors by my side. At GEA my mentor was Mario Consiglio, one of the firm’s founders from 1965 with over 50 years of experience that included directing Confindustria — Italy’s chamber of commerce that was led by legends such as Benetton, Agnelli, and Pininfarina; at FOREO I worked closely with Filip Sedic, the company’s founder and one of the most astonishing entrepreneurs I’ve ever had the chance to meet; presently, I’m grateful to have the support from Steven Schapera, an expert in luxury beauty and the founder of Becca Cosmetics.

In today’s parlance, being disruptive is usually a positive adjective. But is disrupting always good? When do we say the converse, that a system or structure has ‘withstood the test of time’? Can you articulate to our readers when disrupting an industry is positive, and when disrupting an industry is ‘not so positive’? Can you share some examples of what you mean?

This is an excellent question. It can be answered on two, or more levels. Even disruption itself tends to abide by some rules: customer focus, service, quality and professional ethics, just to name a few, span that across this category. If we talk about outcomes, then the key question is positive, or not — but for whom.

Galanz is oftentimes mentioned to have destroyed the microwave oven business, but as a consumer, I prefer paying 30 instead of 800 USD for the same product. I might not be so enthusiastic when squeezing into my seat on an Easyjet flight, but I still get to travel and see my family more than I was able to afford before. For a disruption to become a disruption, it has to succeed. Apple’s Newton was a limited success due to some technical difficulties, and while it was the closest thing to a smartphone, or a PDA, it is rarely recognized as the initial disruption. At the same time it paved the way for many things down the road.

A successful disruption will lead to a rebalance of benefits within its stakeholder system. A bad disruption is one that abuses these dynamics by externalizing the loss to its wider environment, or the future. Nuclear weapons are the most intuitive example. A less known one was the use of radioactive Radium in health and beauty products at the beginning of the 20th century. For some, we simply don’t know — even today. Will the lithium from the car batteries of today’s green vehicles be a problem for generations in the future? It is a bit of a Faustian bargain, but it is intrinsic to innovation and the human condition.

Can you share 3 of the best words of advice you’ve gotten along your journey? Please give a story or example for each.

“No matter how much you beat your cat, you will never have a dog” by Tom Vollman, professor at IMD, Lausanne — I think that one is self-explanatory. Really useful in organizational behavior. Especially when trying hard, it is sometimes easy to lose sight of constraints.

Virtually all the quotes from Dickie Fox in the Jerry Maguire movie. From “I love getting up in the mornings, I clap my hands and say, ‘This is going to be a great day!”, to “If the head is empty, the head doesn’t matter”, and most importantly “I don’t have all the answers. In life, to be honest, I have failed as much as I have succeeded. But I love my wife. I love my life. And I wish you my kind of success.” It is not just their simplicity, but the responsible and proactive direction of these that I enjoy remembering for years now.

We are sure you aren’t done. How are you going to shake things up next?

I am extremely happy to be just at the beginning of an amazing chapter. With REDUIT and WELLFULLY, its mother company, we have now the core infrastructure and over 15 years of advanced delivery technologies research in-house, ready with limitless application possibilities for products that are beyond imagination today.

Do you have a book, podcast, or talk that’s had a deep impact on your thinking? Can you share a story with us? Can you explain why it was so resonant with you?

I really liked the late Hans Rosling. All of his speeches are phenomenal, but “the Magic of the Washing Machine” in particular. Putting things, the world around us and our activities in perspective.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“It’s never too late to have a happy childhood” by Darko Hren, professor at the University of Split. I wish this one was better known. It is really key when working in innovation and developing new things. Our playful nature is an asset in making the world better.

You are a person of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

Discipline in and the practice of critical thinking. As simple as that — the rest will follow.

How can our readers follow you online?

I technically do have both FB and IG, but I manage most of my communications via LinkedIn.

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

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