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Ora Nadrich: “How To Slow Down To Do More”

We are much more focused when we slow down and can experience what’s called “present moment awareness”, which is the practice of Mindfulness. By slowing down, we can increase our level of concentration, which therefore enhances productivity. Slowing down the pace of our lives can give us more time to bring the best of ourselves […]

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We are much more focused when we slow down and can experience what’s called “present moment awareness”, which is the practice of Mindfulness. By slowing down, we can increase our level of concentration, which therefore enhances productivity. Slowing down the pace of our lives can give us more time to bring the best of ourselves to everything we do, which gives us more energy, and an overall feeling of being highly effective at what we do.


As a part of my series about “How to Slow Down To Do More” I had the pleasure to interview Ora Nadrich. She is the founder and president of the Institute for Transformational Thinking, and author of Live True: A Mindfulness Guide to Authenticity and the groundbreaking book, Says Who? How One Simple Question Can Change the Way You Think Forever. A certified life coach and Mindfulness teacher, she specializes in transformational thinking, self-discovery, and mentoring new coaches as they develop their careers.

Ora’s rare combination of insight, intuition, compassion and charisma has made her one of the most effective and sought-after coaches in Los Angeles. Her work has been featured in Women’s Health Magazine, Reader’s Digest, Conscious Lifestyle Magazine, Fast Company, Success Magazine, Spirituality & Health, Elevated Existence, NBC News, LA Yoga Magazine, Yahoo! Health, and many more.


Thank you so much for joining us! Can you tell us the “backstory” about what brought you to this specific career path?

After experiencing a family crisis, and more than two decades on a psycho-spiritual journey, I became a Life Coach, author, and Mindfulness teacher.

According to a 2006 Pew Research Report report, 26% of women and 21% of men feel that they are “always rushed”. Has it always been this way? Can you give a few reasons regarding what you think causes this prevalent feeling of being rushed?

With the advent of social media, and the exponential changes people are experiencing both in their personal lives, and the changes in the world today, there is tremendous pressure to get ahead and survive. This is creating an overall feeling of being rushed all the time to keep up with the demands of everyday life as we know it today.

Based on your experience or research can you explain why being rushed can harm our productivity, health, and happiness?

Being rushed can affect us both mentally and physically. Keeping ourselves at a high level of stress, which feels rushed can produce, is known to increase levels of anxiety, causing an increase in our levels of cortisol, which over a long period of time can lead to increased blood sugar levels. It can also create something called “hurry sickness”, which can create an overwhelming feeling of urgency, which again raises stress levels, and heightens anxiety. Instead of increasing productivity, it actually puts people in a fight-or-flight state and makes them more prone to mistakes.

On the flip side, can you give examples of how we can do more, and how our lives would improve if we could slow down?

We are much more focused when we slow down and can experience what’s called “present moment awareness”, which is the practice of Mindfulness. By slowing down, we can increase our level of concentration, which therefore enhances productivity. Slowing down the pace of our lives can give us more time to bring the best of ourselves to everything we do, which gives us more energy, and an overall feeling of being highly effective at what we do.

We all live in a world with many deadlines and incessant demands for our time and attention. That inevitably makes us feel rushed. Can you share with our readers 6 strategies that you use to “slow down to do more”? Can you please give a story or example for each?

The six strategies I like to use to “slow down to do more” are:

  1. I take a pause a few times in my day. This means I stop what I’m doing and take a few deep breaths in and out, and connect to a feeling of gratitude.
  2. I created something in my new book, Live True called “Life Gazing” which means I either look up from my computer when I’m working for long periods of time, and stare at something outside my window like clouds moving across the sky, or watch birds flying around on my tree, or I step outside for a few minutes and try and ground myself by taking my shoes off and feeling the earth under my feet.
  3. I keep some essential oils around me, and smell one, like lavender or peppermint, to soothe my senses.
  4. I do a 1–4 counting meditation, which is counting “12341” on the inhalation, “12342” on the exhalation, “12343” on the inhalation, “12344” on the exhalation. It’s very relaxing!
  5. I treat myself to something like a delicious fruit that’s in season or get a smoothie from a fresh-pressed juicery.
  6. I close my eyes for a few minutes and allow myself to go within to connect to my inner core, which always gives me a feeling of being aligned to my authentic self.

How do you define “mindfulness”? Can you give an example or story?

Mindfulness is the practice of being present. That means we are fully present in a moment with total awareness, and not rushing through it. This can mean being mindful when we’re eating, and not rushing through a meal, which helps us really taste our food and digest it better. It can mean mindful listening, which helps us give our undivided attention when someone is speaking. It can be mindful walking, and instead of rushing when we’re taking a walk, we’re slowing it down, and noticing all that is around us, like the sounds, or animals in nature, as well as feeling the weather; be it cold or warm.

Can you give examples of how people can integrate mindfulness into their everyday lives?

Mindfulness can be integrated into basically everything we do in our everyday lives. This includes some of the examples I gave above, like eating, walking, and listening, as well as doing activities or chores, like washing the dishes, which we can do with “present moment awareness.” That means we feel the temperature of the water on our hands as we wash a dish, or smell the scent of the dishwashing soap. The same can be done when we’re showering or bathing ourselves. Instead of rushing through it, we take our time, and are aware of how things feel on our body, or smell the scent of the products we’re using like body wash or shampoo. Another way to practice Mindfulness is by using a meditation I created called: “Your Morning Cup of Tea or Coffee Can Be Your Meditation.” Basically, it’s using your senses to fully experience drinking your tea or coffee without rushing. Be aware of how it tastes. Are you feeling the warmth of it on your lips? How does it feel going down your throat? What does it smell like? When you practice Mindfulness in all areas of your life, you are not only more present, but everything you experience feels so much more satisfying and fulfilling.

Do you have any mindfulness tools that you find most helpful at work?

I like to use my breath as one of the most helpful tools. It always grounds you, and brings you into “present moment awareness.”

What are your favorite books, podcasts, or resources that inspire you to use mindfulness tools or practices?

I really like the books of Jon Kabat-Zinn, like: “Wherever You Go, There You Are” and “Mindfulness for Beginners.” I also like my dear friend, Dr. Ronald Alexander’s book: “Wise Mind, Open Mind.” These books are chalk-full of tools and tips for living a more mindful life.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

One of my favorite quotes is: “Be the change you wish to see in the world” by Gandhi. I find it timelessly relevant because it encourages us to take full responsibility for changing within, as opposed to waiting for change to happen outside of ourselves. My work is about transformation, and self-realization, so I find this quote very resonant to what I try to put out into the world to effect change.

You are a person of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I would create a “Raise Your Consciousness Movement, which I’ve already put into motion beginning November 1, 2019, on Facebook. I’m hoping this brings together as many people as possible so that we as a community can “be the change” that Gandhi spoke about, and make a true difference on this planet we share with one another. Please join me at OraNadrich.com/challenge

Thank you so much for these insights! This was so inspiring!

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