Nicky Mukerji of Uniik Company: “Grow together ”

Grow together — No one has been successful by themselves. When you start getting successful, help the people who get you there. Give Back — There is a whole community of people who don’t have the opportunities you do. Do good with the resources you have so others get a chance to get started. Is the American Dream still alive? If […]

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Grow together — No one has been successful by themselves. When you start getting successful, help the people who get you there.

Give Back — There is a whole community of people who don’t have the opportunities you do. Do good with the resources you have so others get a chance to get started.


Is the American Dream still alive? If you speak to many of the immigrants we spoke to, who came to this country with nothing but grit, resilience, and a dream, they will tell you that it certainly is still alive.

As a part of our series about immigrant success stories, I had the pleasure of interviewing Nicky Mukerji.

Nicky Mukerji is the Executive Vice-President of UNIIK Company. He manages an international team, responsible for project management, order fulfillment, and supply chain coordination.

Nicky has a Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering and an MBA with a focus in Finance, Technology, and Operations. He is also a certified PMP (Project Management Professional). Nicky spent 15 years in corporate America, working in supply chain and technology organizations. He has experience with corporate management, IT project management, supply chain integration, business intelligence, and client relationship management. Nicky was serving as the Chief Information Officer of an international legal technology company, when he decided to leave his position and join Dia at UNIIK.

Together, they built a strong technology backbone to support UNIIK’s growth, as well as a seamless supply chain to ensure efficient product flow. Accounting functions were integrated within the supply chain environment, to create an end-to-end workflow encompassing design, product fulfillment and finance.

For every project today, Nicky’s team manages the manufacture and procurement of thousands of items with different specifications, geographical origins, supply constraints and lead times. The team ensures that products arrive on time, per specifications, and under budget. Nicky’s goal has always been to ensure the continued satisfaction of the UNIIK client base, and strongly believes in organic client growth through referrals and recommendations from current stakeholders.

Outside of work, Nicky enjoys music, hiking, and cutting-edge technology gadgets.


Thank you so much for joining us in this interview series! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

We grew up in suburban India. We were close to Bombay (Mumbai now), the largest metropolis in India. My parents were very highly educated and education was the biggest focus they had. They made sure that we had all the opportunities to learn and grow intellectually. From my youngest days, I was always interested in math, science and technology. As the computer as a concept started developing, I was really interested. I was fascinated. I took up computer programming in middle school and started coding. That shaped my higher education in some ways. I took mechanical engineering and continued my education in information technology. From my management school, I was recruited by an American company. I landed in Dallas in October 2000.

Was there a particular trigger point that made you emigrate to the US? Can you tell us the story?

I always wanted to work in America. It had always been a dream for someone in technology to work in the country where technology was created. So when I got the opportunity to work in America for a company that was on the cutting edge of supply chain development, I was thrilled. I never thought twice before making the decision to jump and come to America.

Can you tell us the story of how you came to the USA? What was that experience like?

After I had secured my job, I went to the American consulate to get my Visa. That was not a fun experience. It was very unpleasant. It’s definitely not representative of what America is. The consulates were very difficult. And the flight was a long one. I remember I sat in a middle seat. My boss picked me up at the airport and dropped me to the corporate apartment.

Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped make the move more manageable? Can you share a story?

When I first came to America, I did not know anything. Driving on the right side, groceries, etc. I received help from people I did not know at all. The first time I had to get groceries, my neighbor, who had not seen me at all, she took me to a grocery store and helped me. It was such a good Samaritan thing to do. It was amazing. It was wonderful actually having someone help you. Those are still guiding principles for me.

Another person who really helped me was an executive assistant of my boss’ boss. Kathleen helped me tremendously with just understanding things like how to get a driver’s license, where to buy a car, how to get a loan. These are all very difficult. I could never be more grateful to them for showing me the ropes as a young, almost lost person in this big country.

So how are things going today?

We are blessed to be here. After I started my IT career, I got married to Dia. She was an entrepreneur and once she moved here, she started a small business based on the fabric mills that her family owned. She expanded that business from residences to commercial establishments and hotels and that’s how Uniik was created about 12–13 years ago. It took her a few years just to conceptualize the business while we were working through the green card process. I moved to Nashville from Dallas. In 2015, we decided together that I needed to step down and follow the American dream and build a business and take it to the next level. I joined hands with Dia and we pushed deeper in to our field and focusing more on the hotel industry providing a turnkey interior design and fulfillment service to them.

Today we have an office with employees and workshops that do millwork and quartz work. We have established relationships with factories both local and overseas. We also have our own furniture factory in India. We are blessed to be at the right place at the right time.

How have you used your success to bring goodness to the world?

I always remember my old boss — he would always say, “To whom much is given, much is expected.” And that has always been a guiding principle for me. We have tried to make sure we support various causes whether through personal contributions or through Uniik. We really live by the fact that we are privileged to have the opportunity to do good for others.

You have first hand experience with the US immigration system. If you had the power, which three things would you suggest to improve the system?

The American immigration system is not representative of America and that’s my biggest issue with it. When you go to a consulate overseas and you’re an educated person looking to immigrate, you feel as if you’re looked down upon. For a self-respecting person, that is a very uncomfortable introduction to America

It took me just two days to figure out that is all wrong. We are American citizens now and are treated very differently at the consulates and I don’t think that is necessary. That is not a representation of what this country is or what the people of this country are. The immigration process is very complicated and gratefully, we had one of the best lawyers in Nashville. It still took us nine years to get our green card.

Can you share “5 keys to achieving the American dream” that others can learn from you? Please share a story or example for each.

Educate yourself — Learn the skills required to take your career to the next level.

Dream big — They say “Dream for the stars and the sky will be yours one day.”

Invest — We have more resources here to invest than anywhere else. Buy a house, buy a car. There’s a full banking system to support us.

Grow together — No one has been successful by themselves. When you start getting successful, help the people who get you there.

Give Back — There is a whole community of people who don’t have the opportunities you do. Do good with the resources you have so others get a chance to get started.

We know that the US needs improvement. But are there 3 things that make you optimistic about the US’s future?

1. Americans have always been hardworking and dedicated to their professions, striving for excellence and growth within their careers.

2. Ability for the US to develop talent from within, and attract the best minds from around the world to want to study and work in the US.

3. Strong focus on entrepreneurship and innovation

We are very blessed that some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

I truly admire individuals who make philanthropy an important part of their lives. If I had the chance, I would love to meet someone like Warren Buffet who has “seen it all,” and ask him how he transformed his thought process from an investor to someone who is dedicated to philanthropy. What would he do differently if he had a second chance?

What is the best way our readers can further follow your work online?

Check out our website at uniikco.com or follow us on any one or all of our social media channels at LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

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