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Nate Sukley of Daydream Productions: “Networking/ Credentials”

Networking/ Credentials. People backing your workflow is everything in this game. There’s all types of people in this world and if you scratch someone’s back, they’ll scratch yours. Win/ win. Over time, I’ve come to know many talented individuals. Some are celebrities and some are completely of the grid. It doesn’t matter. People of all kinds […]

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Networking/ Credentials. People backing your workflow is everything in this game. There’s all types of people in this world and if you scratch someone’s back, they’ll scratch yours. Win/ win.

Over time, I’ve come to know many talented individuals. Some are celebrities and some are completely of the grid. It doesn’t matter. People of all kinds have helped me get to where I am and I’m in no position to take all the credit for myself. I needed and still need help. It’s okay to admit that. It’s how you grow.


As a part of our series about “Filmmakers Making A Social Impact” I had the pleasure of interviewing Nate Sukley.

As a 19 year old, Nate Sukley has already accomplished plenty. From founding his own brand Daydream Productions, to directing, filming and editing music videos full time, he most certainly has much to manage. Through forming this brand, Nate has created a close-knit group of talented and young individuals that are scattered throughout the country.


Thank you so much for doing this interview with us! Before we dive in, our readers would love to get to know you a bit. Can you share your “backstory” that brought you to this career?

I’ve always had the creative bug. Growing up, I would draw every day and constantly have music in my ears. I would dabble with every creative outlet there was. Over time, I found a passion for travel videos and they gained a decent amount of support. With that being said, an artist came to me and asked for a music video. After creating something like that and blending a love for original music and my own ideas, it stuck with me. I had plenty of creative friends in my life at the time and we grouped together a unit to organize our passions. That grouped transformed into Daydream Productions.

Can you share the funniest or most interesting story that occurred to you in the course of your filmmaking career?

Everything about this industry is trial and error. There’s no getting around that part. The funniest thing I can think of is when I was when I was shooting a video in downtown Philadelphia in 2018. After seeing the abandoned warehouse location, I started hyping up the drone shots we could get off the roof. We began filming around mid-day inside the warehouse and I completely lost track of time because of all the graffiti in there. I was definitely in my element but started to rush. I told the guys we needed to get on the roof ASAP and started packing my gear up when I ripped the adaptor to my drone right in half. I knew ways around this problem, but it was just extremely embarrassing and ironic how I made the drone shots a key marketing piece and completely ruined it because I was rushing. We managed to get a few close drone shots but I couldn’t get anything too crazy without that stupid adaptor.

Who are some of the most interesting people you have interacted with? What was that like? Do you have any stories?

I would have to say working alongside Jaz Hookmaster Williams and Anthony Dent. These guys are out of this world in their crafts. It all started when I needed a college job. I didn’t want to work at a typical 9–5 because I was doing music videos as well, so I started reaching out to studios in my area of San Diego. Jaz was the first one to get back to me and immediately took me in to make a master course on producing music. Over the course of learning about music production from him, I came to learn he has worked with Mac Miller and many other artists I look up to. From there, he linked me up with Grammy winner Anthony Dent. He is known for producing for Jay Z, Beyonce, Diddy and many other big names. These master courses not only taught me a significant amount about the industry, but these guys have continuously given me opportunities after opportunities.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I have a lot on my plate to say the least. Aside from the 7 music videos that I have in the works, our group has been in album mode for some time now. We aren’t exactly focused on attention and views, but more on the lines of creating something that shows our current skillsets and creativity. It will be a nostalgic piece for the rest of our lives. In addition, our website is being completely redone and the merchandise has been better than ever. It’s just a matter of time until people realize how awesome the music videos have been getting. Each one is better than the last, with new emotions and video constructs.

Which people in history inspire you the most? Why?

Ben Franklin. He’s on the hundred dollar bill for a reason. The man invented so many things that we overlook in todays era. He also built a good amount of framework for this country and didn’t even feel the need to sign the Declaration of Independence. I strive to have that mindset and let my work speak for itself. I don’t need the attention, but respect to my craft is something I work for.

Let’s now shift to the main focus of our interview, how are you using your success to bring goodness to the world? Can you share with us the meaningful or exciting social impact causes you are working on right now?

Through leading Daydream, I try to lead by example. I want to work with as many creators as possible and give everyone a chance to prove themselves. I’ve worked with big name and no names, but it’s about the work that really matters. Diversity and individuality has been lost in the culture, and I want to change that. If small creators group together and work towards success, maybe they won’t be small creators anymore. Good vibes, creativity and passion is all we need to keep going.

Many of us have ideas, dreams, and passions, but never manifest it. But you did. Was there an “Aha Moment” that made you decide that you were actually going to step up and take action for this cause? What was that final trigger?

Daydream got it’s name for a reason. It’s a habit for me. I don’t get much sleep because my brain refuses to shut off. But manifestation is an important element, and I’m glad you brought it up. You can have all the ideas in the world, but until you put it in motion, it doesn’t exist. My Aha moment would have to be when my good friend’s brother hired me for my first music video. I loved the original tune blended with my own filming and decided to keep pushing with it. As this was growing in my mind, my creative friends were also scheming up their own plans. The final trigger was simply establishing a group name and finding a base level to start off with producing, directing, making songs and creating art pieces.

Can you tell us a story about a particular individual who was impacted or helped by your cause?

I would say that every single person in our group has had their lives switched upside down with the new work we have on our hands. A perfect example would be my friend Isaiah. After dropping out of high school, we got him into a deeper depth of music. He went back to finish high school and is now in college for music production, with him being one of our best producers now. A passion for craft can seriously change someone’s life.

Are there three things that individuals, society or the government can do to support you in this effort?

  1. Show love. When we post or create something new, a comment or share to a friend can go a long way for us. You don’t have to give up money to support. Just open critique and positive reassurance is our biggest form of growth.
  2. Keep an open mind. Just because something isn’t what you’re used to doesn’t mean it’s necessarily bad. Who knows, one of our songs could be your next favorite, but you’ll never know until you give it a chance.
  3. Collaboration. If you’re in our field, feel free to hit us up for any work you need! We love working with new people and getting to see new perspectives of artists. Clout doesn’t matter and never will. Even Kanye had to start somewhere.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

1 . You do not need school to improve. If anything, school can very much hold you back, especially if you don’t know what you want to do yet. Don’t waste your money taking GE classes. It’s not worth it.

After dreading high school and fueling my dream to move to California, I finally graduated and make it to San Diego. I enrolled in college for Business Marketing only to find myself stuck taking GE classes for two years. That’s two years of paying for classes that are required, which I never had interest in to begin with. If you want something, just learn it on your own at this point.

2. Youtube. You can learn anything and everything by watching tutorials. That’s how I learned new things for editing and how my producers learned where to start.

I taught myself how to film, direct and edit on my own. Most of it was trial and error. You get the equipment and try and try and try. When you hit rough spots or have an urge to know more, YouTube is the way to go.

3. Networking/ Credentials. People backing your workflow is everything in this game. There’s all types of people in this world and if you scratch someone’s back, they’ll scratch yours. Win/ win.

Over time, I’ve come to know many talented individuals. Some are celebrities and some are completely of the grid. It doesn’t matter. People of all kinds have helped me get to where I am and I’m in no position to take all the credit for myself. I needed and still need help. It’s okay to admit that. It’s how you grow.

4. Communication. It’s important to let people you work with know how you are feeling and what your life is consisting of. Nine times out of ten they will understand where you are coming from, and you can figure out the problems from there.

With a group that is scattered across the country, it can be difficult trying to stay on the same page. A wonderful thing we picked up was starting weekly zoom sessions. It keeps us united and organized in our tunnel vision mindset.

5. Patience. As Big Sean said, “it took 10 years to be an overnight success.” Everything can’t change overnight. However, if you apply daily implements of change to your life, your life will change.

I remember times where I wanted to quit the video stuff. I still get like that sometimes. Not going to lie, it can hurt when a video you spend 2 months on only gets 100 views. But at the end of the day, I still get paid to do what I love. It only takes time for people to see the talent.

If you could tell other young people one thing about why they should consider making a positive impact on our environment or society, like you, what would you tell them?

This is all our first (and only) attempt at living life. We are all trying to grow and improve in this world. Pulling each other down will only make it worse all around. Positive impacts go a long way for someone’s mental. It can make you feel on top of the world or like it’s the end of the world.

We are very blessed that many other Social Impact Heroes read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US, whom you would like to collaborate with, and why? He or she might see this. 🙂

Cole Bennett, Kanye West, Elon Musk, Rory Kramer where y’all at????? If you gave the kid a chance, I bet you wouldn’t regret it. I guarantee I’d work harder than anyone you’ve got hired and you might even learn a thing or two.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

One Man Can Change the World. Big Sean. I was at a dark spot in life when this song came into my life. It gave me a hope that nothing else ever will and I don’t think that’ll fade away any time soon. Inspiration hits at any time, you just have to be willing to let it into your life.

How can our readers follow you online?

@natesukley on Instagram

Nate Sukley on Youtube

Daydream Productions on Youtube

Follow the journey !

This was great, thank you so much for sharing your story and doing this with us. We wish you continued success!


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