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Natasha Louckevitch: “Never give up.”

Since I have immigration experiences to and from other countries, I don’t feel that there was anything particularly hard. It is a lot of work, yes. But it was my choice! All I had to do was abide by the rules and make everything legally to avoid problems.I do realize this comes from my perspective, […]

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Since I have immigration experiences to and from other countries, I don’t feel that there was anything particularly hard. It is a lot of work, yes. But it was my choice! All I had to do was abide by the rules and make everything legally to avoid problems.

I do realize this comes from my perspective, and not everyone has the same story to tell. But to me, the immigration process was just a task that needed to be completed to achieve what I wanted. The rules were clear, and I did not want to waste any time thinking if I agree with them or not.


I had the pleasure of interviewing Natasha Louckevitch. Natasha is an experienced and awarded Executive Producer. She specialized in international production, strategy, partnerships, and localization. (NA, LATAM, EMEA, AND JAPAC)

She worked on her authorial movies from script to post-production. These experiences helped mold her passion for finding and nurturing new talent and made her the well-rounded Executive Producer she is today.

Her favorite aspect of the many hats she wears is to solve problems regardless of the level of difficulty. In her career, she was responsible for creating teams to enable creatives all over the world to come together and disrupt the status quo. Aside from working in and with short films, documentaries, series, and long format; in her advertising career, she worked with clients such as Colgate-Palmolive, Nestle, Kraft, Mondelez, SC Johnson, GlaxoSmithKline, Abbott, and P&G, producing more than 100 commercials in over 20 countries.

In 2007, after finishing her studies at NYU, Natasha continued the path on her career and had the opportunity to leave and work in Brazil, (her native country), Argentina and France. Today, Natasha, along with her husband and their two sons, moved to the creative and thriving capital of Texas, Austin, where she opened her production company C/Purpose. Only one year into it, the company’s first produced web-series for a local winemaker — ‘Dandy’-, got selected for more than eight festivals worldwide and is easily navigating between the worlds of cinema and advertising. Recently, the series got officially selected for Rebelfest London 2019 and shortlisted for a LIA. (London International Awards)


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

Igrew up in one of the biggest cities in the world. São Paulo, Brazil, has more than 20 million people living in it, so it’s safe to say I come from a megalopolis. I was born into a Jewish family of immigrants. My parents divorced when I was nine years old, and both of them re-married AND re-divorced. I changed schools a few times and always felt like a fish out of water. Creativity was, since a very young child, an outlet for all the chaos I felt around me. It was either drawing, painting, writing everything from poems to music lyrics until I came in contact with filmmaking. When that bug bit me, it bit me hard! I knew I needed to work in that industry, one way or another.

Was there a particular trigger point that made you emigrate to the US? Can you tell a story?

Not a specific event. However, when I decided to work in film, I was about 19 years old.

That year, 1999, Walter Salles just did the hit Brazilian Film’ Central Station’, which got nominated for several prestigious awards, (‘The Oscars,’ ‘Bafta,’ and more), ultimately winning a Golden Globe award for best actress. This landmark, and the path that Fernando Meirelles* was taking, (*director of ‘City of God’ & ‘The Constant Gardener’ ), would put for the first time in history, Brazilian cinema on the international map.

Let me say one thing before I give out the wrong impression. I love Brazilian culture and Brazilian cinema. The creativity that comes out of Brazil is unprecedented. But, because of social and political issues, it is an industry that is very fragile, and right now is under massive attack by extreme-right president Jair Bolsonaro. –

The kind of background that I have, with the stories I wanted to tell, I didn’t feel there was a place for me. My family saw me as the artsy/crazy/irresponsible black ship with filmmaking dreams. And for people in the industry, I was this ‘bourgeois girl’ who was there for some sort of masochist anthropological tourism.

To top all that, I’m a woman!

In the year 2000, I had the opportunity to study filmmaking in L.A.

I’d been to the U.S. before, but living there and experiencing the freedom to just ‘be’ was liberating.

I decided that I would make my way to this country. This is where I chose, identified myself with, and loved.

Can you tell us the story of how you came to the USA? What was that experience like?

After finishing my communications B.A. in Brazil, I wanted to go for my masters. Without ever studying in a bi-lingual school, I thought I should try to apply for Tisch School of the Arts. (NYU). If you ever made an application for a master’s degree with a high competition ratio, (When I applied, it was about 100 students per spot), or you grew up in America, you know that this is hard, arduous work.

It takes practically writing a book, and in my case, doing so in a different language. It might have worked to my advantage that I wasn’t panicking about it. I was, in a way, just testing waters to see how far I could get.

To my surprise, I was called for an interview. When I went to tell my family, I got shut down. So no, I did not pursue my masters. I didn’t have the money for it. And as a foreign student, my options to work and help pay it off were limited.

That didn’t mean that I was going to give up on either filmmaking or the U.S.

So, I made my path and worked in the industry in Brazil, but mainly advertising to pay bills. From Brazil, I began to make an international career largely due to the fact that I speak four languages. Many years later, I would take the big leap of faith, and with the experience I’ve acquired over the years, open my own production company in Austin, Texas.

Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped make the move more manageable? Can you share a story?

My husband! I am the luckiest woman on this planet. We’ve been together for almost sixteen years now, have two beautiful boys and had a lot of ups and downs. But he was the one who held my hand and made the usually selfless and unrewarded job of show and tell me the truth. Even when I hated him for it. The reality, even when it hurts, is always better than the illusion.

So how are things going today?

Moving countries is never easy. I’ve done it a few times before, so I know that the first two years are always an adaptation process. We are still learning and meeting new people.

And America isn’t perfect, but I love it! I love everything about it. I love this country, and I love its people. I love the freedom people have to express themselves.

In the cul-de-sac I leave in, we have Beto voters and Ted Cruz ones. Trump haters and supporters. And you know what? At the end of the day, they are all good people. I am glad that my boys can hang out with such different people and have freedom and protection to speak out their own minds and learn to respect someone else’s same freedom. I think that this is a reality a lot of Americans take for granted!

How have you used your success to bring goodness to the world?

I do a lot of volunteer work and love it. From mentoring the younger generation of females who want to get into film and advertising, to cultural film festivals. But I don’t feel it is enough or that it has a significant impact on the massive scheme of things. I can say that I am and always have been committed to becoming a better human being and learning from my mistakes. Sometimes I do a pretty good job, and sometimes I don’t.

You have first-hand experience with the US immigration system. If you had the power, which three things would you change to improve the system?

Since I have immigration experiences to and from other countries, I don’t feel that there was anything particularly hard. It is a lot of work, yes. But it was my choice! All I had to do was abide by the rules and make everything legally to avoid problems.

I do realize this comes from my perspective, and not everyone has the same story to tell. But to me, the immigration process was just a task that needed to be completed to achieve what I wanted. The rules were clear, and I did not want to waste any time thinking if I agree with them or not.

Can you share “5 keys to achieving the American dream” that others can learn from you? Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Never give up
  2. NEVER GIVE UP!
  3. Never. Give. Up.
  4. nEvEr gIvE uP
  5. Work HARD and never give up. When you achieve what you wanted, work harder to maintain it.

We know that the US needs improvement. But are there 3 things that make you optimistic about the US’s future?

I believe that because of its history, the U.S has the most vigorous democracy on the planet. It survived many attempts to undermine it before. It’s in the American core to protect its constitution, and even if it might seem to be stumbling from time to time, it will never break. I believe in that.

Some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might see this. 🙂

My 8-year-old did a school project when he was in first grade. He had to “be” Abraham Lincoln for his Live Museum. He likes history, and he particularly loved Lincoln’s. I’m guessing he won’t see this, but he would be the one I would pick ;-). (Honest Abe, that is.) So that I could take my boy with me 😉

What is the best way our readers can follow you on social media?

My companies’ site: https://cpurpose.com/

Our Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/cpurpose

Our Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/contentpurpose/

Our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/CPurpose/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/c__purpose

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/c-purpose/

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

Thank you!

Natasha Louckevitch. Natasha is an experienced and awarded Executive Producer. She specialized in international production, strategy, partnerships, and localization. (NA, LATAM, EMEA, AND JAPAC)

She worked on her authorial movies from script to post-production. These experiences helped mold her passion for finding and nurturing new talent and made her the well-rounded Executive Producer she is today.

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