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My Life as a TwentySomething Founder, With Thomas Lotrecchiano of Omigo

When you actually take the time to listen to your customers, they will give you so much more than their gripes. When a customer leaves a great review, look at the language they use. The way people talk to you is how they would like to be spoken to in your advertisements, on your website, […]

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When you actually take the time to listen to your customers, they will give you so much more than their gripes. When a customer leaves a great review, look at the language they use. The way people talk to you is how they would like to be spoken to in your advertisements, on your website, and everywhere else. They also show you your shortcomings, which is invaluable!


As a part of our series called “My Life as a TwentySomething Founder”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Thomas Lotrecchiano.

Thomas Lotrecchiano is the co-founder of Omigo, a modern bidet brand bringing a clean, green bathroom solution to Americans. A former AmeriCorps NCCC volunteer, the 20-something entrepreneur launched Omigo in 2017 along with his father, Tom Lotrecchiano. In the past two years, the Raleigh, North Carolina-based father/son duo have grown the company into a multi-million dollar venture, selling direct-to-consumer on MyOmigo.com.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! What is your “backstory”?

My backstory starts with my family. I’m lucky enough to be the namesake of two exceptional men — my father and my grandfather. My dad worked for his dad from the time he was young, through adulthood, at their family-owned printing business. I had the same fortune when I got to work for my dad’s image-to-canvas artwork company, canvasondemand.com, throughout my teenage years. Being able to watch a company go from five employees to 250+ is truly something special.

Early on, my Dad and I knew that one day we would be working together. After I finished two years volunteering with AmeriCorps NCCC, my dad became fascinated with bidets — hi-tech, luxury bidet toilet seats to be exact. They were “the best thing in the world” according to him, and it’s all he would talk about. He was truly dumbstruck that Americans weren’t using these magical washers. Upon initial inspection, bidets seemed a bit complex and excessive, and I thought, “Are they really necessary? We’ve been wiping for years, why change now?” But curiosity took hold and after a few glorious washes I realized the error of my ways: washing is way better than wiping. We were both hooked and it was an epiphany moment for us.

We started diving deeper into the bidet world and asking questions: “Why would anyone choose to take dry paper in their hand and reach below to clean themselves? Why, in our hygiene obsessed culture, is that considered normal?” The more we thought about it, the more we realized our first entrepreneurial venture as a father and son team would need to be in the bidet business. After inspecting every type, make, and model of bidet we could find we decided to create a luxury toilet seat experience that would bring a clean, green solution to the American people.

Two years later and here we are! It has been a special experience to work side-by-side with my father. I learn something every day from him and he has even admitted to learning a thing or two from me. However, it isn’t without struggles! Our personalities are very similar, which can be challenging, but the overall journey has been overwhelmingly positive.

Can you share the funniest or most interesting story that happened to you since you started your company? What lessons or takeaways did you take out of that story?

Early on, I called every single customer after they purchased a bidet to learn more about their experience, answer questions and take feedback. I had a customer return my call one day and he immediately started sharing details of his personal bidet experience. Let’s just say, things got graphic and intimate pretty quickly! Although the conversation was a bit awkward, I learned a lot from that call. We ended up putting one of his questions about our spray nozzles on the product page, and this question has helped tons of other buyers.

When you actually take the time to listen to your customers, they will give you so much more than their gripes. When a customer leaves a great review, look at the language they use. The way people talk to you is how they would like to be spoken to in your advertisements, on your website, and everywhere else. They also show you your shortcomings, which is invaluable!

What do you think makes your company stand out? Can you share a story?

We have a few things that help us stand out. The fact that we get to talk about poop is one! Our messaging isn’t graphic — we are straightforward and real with our copy, and that helps us differentiate ourselves from other brands and competition. We keep our messaging very family-friendly. We don’t say anything that your potty-talk-loving toddler wouldn’t say.

It also helps that we make fantastic, modern and aesthetically-pleasing bidets that look great in any bathroom. Not all bidets are created equal, and Omigo uses the highest quality materials like ceramic, brass, stainless steel and high-tensile plastics for durability. Not to mention, all products have a 90-day trial and 1-year warranty. We specifically designed our products to be easy to install, but for those customers who need a little extra help or have a few specific questions, our customer service team is truly top-notch and goes above and beyond.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story?

I have to shout out Tushy founder Miki Agrawal, as she truly changed the game for bidets in America. When she started her direct-to-consumer bidet company, she was loud and proud about it. Her brand was — and still is — boundary breaking and really got the attention of the country. Tushy talks about pooping, peeing, sexual health, postpartum health, vaginal cleanliness, you name it! Without her bold vision to get every U.S. citizen to wash their butts after they poop, we wouldn’t be where we are now.

Additionally, Omigo wouldn’t exist without my dad. He has helped guide this brand from the beginning, and my success is due in part to his guidance. He consults with and helps multiple Digitally-Native Vertical Brands (DNVBs) scale, so he has his hand on the pulse of e-commerce. Because of that, we are always applying the best, most refined marketing tactics to our brand.

Are you working on any exciting projects now?

I’m still excited to continue working on MyOmigo.com. We are always working to elevate the brand, hone our messaging, tighten up our email flows and get customers talking about Omigo as much as possible. Every single day is an exciting challenge, and we look forward to what the future holds!

How have you used your success to bring goodness to the world?

I truly feel that Omigo’s success is tied to goodness in the world. When you only use toilet paper to clean yourself, it has a tremendous environmental impact. Americans use 36.5 billion rolls of toilet paper every year — which requires millions of trees, billions of gallons of water and massive amounts of electricity. Additionally, up to half of the tree pulp used to make toilet paper in the U.S. is a product of tree farms either from South America or right here in America. The rest is looted from ancient, second growth forests that are essential in absorbing carbon dioxide and trapping heat gas to prevent global warming.

Switching to a bidet cuts toilet paper consumption by 75 to 100 percent in your home. Stopping single use paper consumption in the United States is a mission that we are truly passionate about.

Do you have a favorite book that made a deep impact on your life? Can you share a story?

The book that has had the biggest impact on my entrepreneurial journey is Building a StoryBrand by Donald Miller. It completely shifted how we treat our brand and how we talk to customers. Messaging is so important for a digitally native brand, because that is our touchpoint! Even if your brand is 20 years old, you need to ensure you’re elevating your customer to hero status and pulling your brand back to be the guide that moves them along a journey. This book is short, actionable, and easy to read. I’ll definitely be rereading it next year and I recommend that every brand owner picks up a copy.

What are the main takeaways that you would advise a twenty-year-old who is looking to found a business?

Start now! If you’re in college — surrounded by peers and relentless energy — it’s the perfect time to try something. The hard truth is: you won’t have the engine you possess now in the future. Your college experience is fed by like-minded individuals, brilliant teachers, a built-in work ethic, and a safety net in your degree. Try early, fail early.

Another piece of advice? Do things that don’t scale. When you’re small and agile, you need to act that way. Find something that you think would really spark your customer acquisition and do it manually. For example, I used to call every single person that purchased an Omigo to get feedback, in hopes of a review and referral. Although it’s not feasible to call hundreds of people a day anymore, it taught our company so much.

We are very blessed that some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might see this. 🙂

I would love to be put in a time machine to meetMarcus Aurelius, the last of five great Roman emperors. The first thing I would ask him is what he eats for breakfast! Marcus wrote the book The Essential Marcus Aurelius in the year 160 A.C. but his take on Stoic philosophy is still very relevant in 2020.

More realistically, I’d like to have lunch with Richard Allison, the CEO of Domino’s. What his company has done in the past few years has been extremely impressive. I’d also like to chat with Thomas Dundon, the new Carolina Hurricanes owner. I’m a big fan of where the franchise is headed and how he has gotten there so far. Plus, he has a stake in a number of impressive businesses. I wouldn’t want to drill them with questions or interview them, rather just have a chat. People with that much drive and success have so many interesting things to say, and I’d love to hear them!

What is the best way our readers can follow you on social media?

Request me on LinkedIn and follow Omigo on Instagram.

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

Thank you!

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