Moroccan traditional clothes

Morocco is a country rich in terms of history, traditions, people, culture, religion, climate, geography and more. Each of these aspects of the country influences the way Moroccans dress. Also, the influence of other cultures and traditions of the empires that occupied Morocco in the past is non-negotiable. Djellaba : Djellaba (djellabas, djellaba) is a traditional […]

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Morocco is a country rich in terms of history, traditions, people, culture, religion, climate, geography and more. Each of these aspects of the country influences the way Moroccans dress. Also, the influence of other cultures and traditions of the empires that occupied Morocco in the past is non-negotiable.

Djellaba :

Djellaba (djellabas, djellaba) is a traditional Berber clothing and a version of the robe. With its loose fit, very long sleeves, and a pointed hood, it is suitable for both men and women. The presence of a hood in clothes is explained by the need to protect from the sun and sand in the hot desert climates. Also, the hood sometimes provides a kind of pocket for storing small amounts of food. Traditionally, Djellaba was made from coarse wool or cotton.

While touring in Morocco deserts, it is recommended to wear Djellaba due to the changeable weather there.

The Caftan :

The Caftan or Takchita appeared in the Maghreb as early as the 3rd century AD. It is an ancestral costume dating back to the Greco-Roman civilization. It has undergone several changes over time while retaining through the ages its specificity, its beauty, and its simplicity.

Originally, the Caftan was expensive, only the sultans and their wives had the privilege to wear it. Indeed, it took months to shape and embroider.

However, since the 21st century, the caftan has been widely democratized with cheaper versions. Perfectly dressed, it is also worn by men.

The Gandoura :

The Gandoura, a traditional male dress, is mainly sold during the month of Ramadan or during Eid. There are 2 versions of it: the simple Gandoura with its long loose cotton dress and short sleeves and the M’likh, two Gandouras with long sleeves superimposed. The latter has much better quality, more elegant than the simple Gandoura because it is hand-stitched.

The babouche :

The babouche or “Belgha” is made according to an ancestral know-how. The leathers come from the tanneries of the Medina of Fes. Its forms and patterns differ from one region to another. Even to this day, it remains the most worn “shoe” because it is light and practical, and represents a whole art of living. Conceived to be easily taken off, it also allows natural ventilation of the foot. The babouche, a symbol of time and reflection, is the opposite of the sports shoe which represents running and speed. Traditionally, it is hand-stitched by a worker who only makes one pair a day.

Not to mention, It remains essential for the ornament of weddings and religious festivals. The purists choose it in a bright yellow and preferably made in Fes.

The Tarbouche :

The Tarbouche is a male headgear made of wool, almost always red, and which takes its name from the city of Fes. Rigid, conical, and high, it is worn with traditional clothes and slippers on festive days.

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