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Monday Musical Spotlight 🎶🎵: Solomon Linda #SouthAfrica

The Sound Of Vocal Marriage To The Wind🌬️! Honoring South African Vocalist and Creator Of, "Mbube"-The Originator Of, "The Lion Sleeps Tonight!" #SouthAfrica

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The sound of acapella. Of course, that is the English (Western) term for the collection of human voices, who come together for the performance of song. It’s one of the most fascinating, and magical phenomenons, for humanity’s performance of music. 🎵 🎶 🎵 Intriguing and euphoric, indeed! Such a performance for this type of musical ensemble are magical. For they showcase how voices form partnerships with the wind. Singing without being accompanied with musical instruments, forces a singer to develop a sensitivity to the space. It forces a people to become in tune with what has been made to navigate through the timing of the winds. 💦 🌊

Another intriguing mystique about singing acapella, is that it forces you to connect with those, who are singing with you. Together, you are in this journey, where you have to depend on each other for the very success of the song. That’s what it is about. You have to ensure that you are flowing together, in tune and connected to the right rhythm, harmony, and beat! Every voice has to be intertwined with the other, so that the sound brings balance, with the acoustics of the space.

What makes this even more pleasing is that there are certain vibes, which caters to moving through a song. Patience is one of them. Having the right synchronicity is another. Understanding, and feeling, the voices of the other members of the group is another vying factor.

Lastly, there is the issue concerning, where sound is being projected. Land makes a difference in the creation of sound. How a culture moves through different trajectories of land-and how they have cultivated themselves within it-are the reasons for the different projections of sound. All of such is also connected to music. 🎵 🎶 🎵

There is one particular song, which highlights that connectivity of a specific people to land, and that unique connection to, the winds! In fact, it is sung so powerfully that a person feels as of they are flowing, through the winds of time! South African winds, to be exact! That’s the manner of movement, and how it navigates through time. When it comes through the ecstasy of winds, there are those sacred harmonies of vocals, which move with that level of tenderness-through those Earthly acoustics. 🌎 🌍

The song was called, “Mbube,” and it would go on to project itself, within different spaces of the world. Groups such as Ladysmith Black Mambazo, would also come to make it a popular hit. And, of course, there was the man, who would move to understand the treasures of such riches. His Mother Tongue is Zulu. The kind of musical genre, that would come to move one through such a task would be a South Africa genre, known as, Isicathamiya. Of course, it originated from the Zulu people of South Africa. We can come to address him as, Solomon Ntsele! Simultaneously, the world would come to know him, as. . .

Solomon Popoli Linda

https://factrepublic.com/facts/17329; Edits By Lauren Kaye Clark
https://performingsongwriter.com/lion-sleeps-tonight/; Edits By Lauren Kaye Clark
https://youtu.be/mrrQT4WkbNE
https://open.spotify.com/artist/64Nxjh5af64ViXrJE7XJjc
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