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Michelle Lewis of Visibility Vixen: “Limit your work hours”

Start with a clear, low cost product. Instead of putting your heart and soul into a course with a hefty price tag, create something that’s a no-brainer that will easily build your audience. I wish I would have done that in the beginning instead of dealing with the frustration of zero sales for too long. […]

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Start with a clear, low cost product. Instead of putting your heart and soul into a course with a hefty price tag, create something that’s a no-brainer that will easily build your audience. I wish I would have done that in the beginning instead of dealing with the frustration of zero sales for too long. Build a list of buyers who loved your low-cost product so then it’s easier to sell them into your higher-cost products when you have them available {and the cash flow to make it easy}.


As part of our series called “5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Began Leading My Company” I had the pleasure of interviewing Michelle Lewis of Visibility Vixen®.

Michelle Lewis is a Visibility and Publicity Expert who helps entrepreneurs skyrocket their visibility, launch their unique show strategy and start landing press for their brand with Hollywood techniques found in the Visibility Lounge.

“The Queen of Visibility” — Founder and CEO Michelle Lewis is a leading authority on color psychology, brand positioning and publicity strategy. She’s helped thousands of entrepreneurs land their dream features and impact their ever-expanding audience with her techniques.

Michelle’s journey began in 2016 when she left Hollywood and started with her first e-book, which became an e-course, which became a steadily growing brand.


Thank you so much for joining us in this interview series! Before we dive in, our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. Can you tell us a bit about your ‘backstory’ and how you got started?

Absolutely! I actually started my career working on films and tv shows before moving my business online. But once I had a script idea taken from me by a major studio, I realized I wanted something that was mine. That couldn’t be taken so easily. So that led me to the online space. What started as helping people get more confident on camera and livestreaming morphed over the years to using my film background to teach important visibility elements like color psychology, brand videos and other online strategies.

What was the “Aha Moment” that led to the idea for your current company? Can you share that story with us?

It was at a coffee shop in the spring of 2016. A friend of mine knew what I was going through and asked, “why don’t you teach people how to make videos?”. I thought she was nuts! Didn’t everyone know how to do that? But it was the idea that stuck in my head and led me to where I’m at.

Can you tell us a story about the hard times that you faced when you first started your journey? Did you ever consider giving up? Where did you get the drive to continue even though things were so hard?

I think it’s totally normal to think about giving up every day the first year, or even two years of your business. There’s no one-size-fits all plan, is there? So much experimentation, failure, frustration, comparisonitis. But here’s the thing…most people DO give up. Most brilliant ideas stay unknown because the work is too hard. Persistence, grit and determination don’t come easily. For me, I think it was the years of health issues I dealt with that put that grit in me and kept me from throwing in the towel. And I’m honestly very grateful for that internal iron.

So, how are things going today? How did your grit and resilience lead to your eventual success?

Early on, I learned to stop listening to all of the coaches and gurus out there. I put my head down and kept trying. What could I do that no one else was doing? Well, I knew how to use color psychology in set design. Why not apply that to my brand? And when it worked, I was able to book Entrepreneur On Fire and TEDx using that concept. I applied to opportunities most people wait to feel qualified for. But I figured, why not? I think that’s what led to my growth and success the most. I just keep trying.

What do you think makes your company stand out? Can you share a story?

The best part of my business, in my opinion, is service. We don’t get visible to just be seen…we do it to serve. I work with entrepreneurs who have a global impact in mind. Who want to use their revenue to make the world a better place. For me, that means I have my members vote every month for where they want 10% of the revenue to go. This last year, we’ve contributed to building homes, supporting Covid centers, disaster relief and even sending Christmas boxes to children all over the world.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

Limit your work hours. I know it feels impossible, but my productivity and health got so much better when I forced myself to unplug at lunch time. It’s not necessarily possible 100% of the time, but I make it a rule to be done after 4–5 hours of work each day. It gives me time to prioritize exercise, family and healthy eating so I can continue to run my business efficiently. It’s also a great example to my students.

What are the most common mistakes you have seen CEOs & founders make when they start a business? What can be done to avoid those errors?

They subscribe to 25 newsletters and podcasts of people they admire. Which means every morning they read or listen to so much information. This leads to overwhelm, comparisonitis and exhaustion when it comes to being creative in their own business. It’s vital to listen to your own voice when it comes to building your business and leave enough brain space to get things done instead of taking in too much information.

In your experience, which aspect of running a company tends to be most underestimated? Can you explain or give an example?

I think publicity management. It’s entirely possible to have your team monitor, apply and secure podcasts, stages and publications for your brand. Usually, however, there’s so much going on with other aspects of the business, this credibility-builder gets overlooked and lost for years and years. I always emphasize building this with my clients and students so they can build their name in their industry much faster.

Ok super. Here is the main question of our interview. What are your “5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Began Leading My Company”? Please share a story or an example for each.

  1. Get your systems in place. I spent way too much time trying to link multiple softwares together and it led to too many headaches and wasted time. Once I found an all-in-one to run the payments, funnels, website and list for my business — life got a lot simpler. Now I can do pretty much everything with Kajabi, Gsuite, Wave and Canva.
  2. Get your url’s and trademarks. Not enough business owners do proper research before launching products and names. I remember calling myself a visibility coach in the beginning and getting hit with a cease and desist because someone had trademarked that name. A few years later, I had to send one to a brand because they had used my business name for their product. I’ve really learned to check a name I want with a domain host as well as the USPTO before moving forward with it and advise my students to do the same.
  3. Start with a clear, low cost product. Instead of putting your heart and soul into a course with a hefty price tag, create something that’s a no-brainer that will easily build your audience. I wish I would have done that in the beginning instead of dealing with the frustration of zero sales for too long. Build a list of buyers who loved your low-cost product so then it’s easier to sell them into your higher-cost products when you have them available {and the cash flow to make it easy}.
  4. Know the process before you hire. There’s nothing worse than hiring a VA, social media manager, ads manager or designer to do something for you and having it not turn out as expected. I’ve found that putting a little effort into understanding the process I want outsourced makes me a much better boss. So, if you want someone to manage your Pinterest, for example, take a short course on it so you know the work required. For me, I’m able to keep an eye on their posting, engagement and know the warning signs if a job isn’t being done correctly. It’s been an invaluable asset.
  5. Manage your finances. When I first got started, I didn’t have any credit cards or help. So I had to be highly aware of every dollar going in and coming out. The great lesson in that was not getting over leveraged. To start, keep a running tally of the sales you’re making and the expenses you’re spending on a white board in your office. This will help you manage your cash flow well and only invest in the next hire or expense when you’re ready for it financially.

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

It would honestly be to give. If every single business owner gave 10% of their income to help the world in the way they were most passionate, we would live in a different place. So whether it’s helping the honeybees, homeless or children, focus on your giving. It will actually bless you and your business more than you can imagine. Plus, why have a dream to change the world if we don’t put our finances to actually making it a reality?

How can our readers further follow you online?

I’m very easy to find — http://www.visibilityvixen.com.

Instagram: http://instagram.com/visibilityvixen

Clubhouse: @visibilityvixen

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for the time you spent with this!

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