Community//

“Make sleep non-negotiable” with Dr. William Seeds & Judy Gaman

Make sleep non-negotiable — Sleep is how the body resets itself. New research shows that when we sleep our brain actually goes through a cleansing cycle, much like a washing machine, it clears out debris. Lack of sleep can affect mood and chronic lack of sleep can put a person at risk for dementia. Seven and […]

Make sleep non-negotiable — Sleep is how the body resets itself. New research shows that when we sleep our brain actually goes through a cleansing cycle, much like a washing machine, it clears out debris. Lack of sleep can affect mood and chronic lack of sleep can put a person at risk for dementia. Seven and a half hours of uninterrupted sleep is a good rule of thumb. No excuses — make sleep a priority.


As a part of my series about the women in wellness, I had the pleasure of interviewing Judy Gaman. Judy is the CEO of Executive Medicine of Texas , a luxury medical practice that services some of the world’s most influential individuals. She is also an award-winning author, radio and podcast host, and sought after speaker. Her latest book Love, Life, and Lucille: Lessons from a Centenarian will be released April 2020.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to “get to know you” better. Can you share your “backstory” with us?

I was that girl that always had ‘talks too much’ on every report card. Even up until high school I was a slow reader. As an adult I was diagnosed with dyslexia and the whole world opened up. With some incredible teaching tools I learned how to read differently. I went from hating to read to not being able to put a book down. I finished my undergrad and graduate school after age thirty, receiving both from George Washington University. Now I am finishing up a graduate certificate in strategic management from Harvard Extension School. My whole life blossomed after thirty. My fifth book is coming out in April, I have spent almost ten years on radio educating people about their health, and in January 2019 I was promoted to CEO.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started your career? What were the main lessons or takeaways from that story?

A few years back I was working on the book Age to Perfection: How to Thrive to 100, Happy, Healthy, and Wise. Instead of just regurgitating research, I decided to interview those who had lived past their 100th birthday. That’s how I met Lucille. She and I became best friends and actually went on the book tour together. She taught me so many things about life. One, you can reinvent your purpose at any time, as evidenced by Lucille branding herself as a longevity expert while we were out on tour. Second, true friendship knows no age.

Can you share a story about the biggest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

I was in my twenties and thought I knew everything. I was so eager to prove that I was smart, capable, and ready for a promotion that I crossed the line. After a physician I worked for refused to participate in a group exercise, I decided to give him a piece of my mind. It took years to repair that relationship. I learned a hard lesson: respect is more important than being right.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

My mother was an RN and worked long hours. For most of my childhood and early adult life I resented her, but I now realize that her work ethic rubbed off on me in a good way. Much like my mom, I always strive to do the best and most complete job I can, whatever the task.

Ok perfect. Now let’s jump to our main focus. When it comes to health and wellness, how is the work you are doing helping to make a bigger impact in the world?

As the CEO at Executive Medicine of Texas, I am able to help so many people individually through the work we do. In turn, companies have benefited greatly as their top talent performs at their peak levels. As a radio show and podcast host, I have been able to give free advice on how the listeners can stay healthy and live longer. I believe that better health starts with a good education. You can’t fix what you don’t understand.

Can you share your top five “lifestyle tweaks” that you believe will help support people’s journey towards better wellbeing? Please give an example or story for each.

Drink adequate amounts of water — It’s a simple thing and it’s free. So why are so many people walking around dehydrated? Probably because they don’t know how much water they should be drinking. A good rule of thumb is to take your weight, divide that number in half and drink that amount in ounces. For example: a 140 pound person needs 70 ounces of water per day, even more if exercising or out in the heat.

Make sleep non-negotiable — Sleep is how the body resets itself. New research shows that when we sleep our brain actually goes through a cleansing cycle, much like a washing machine, it clears out debris. Lack of sleep can affect mood and chronic lack of sleep can put a person at risk for dementia. Seven and a half hours of uninterrupted sleep is a good rule of thumb. No excuses — make sleep a priority.

Avoid artificial sweeteners — Regardless of the controversy, any medical professional will tell you that artificial sweeteners are the first thing you need to cut out if you suffer from migraine headaches, memory issues, or gut issues. Be sure to read labels because these days you can find them in everything, including medicine, gum, and even toothpaste.

Protect your gut microbiome — It used to be all about the heart, but these days, it’s all about the gut. Why? Because science has shown us that there is a direct correlation between the gut and the brain, they’ve even given it the name — enteric nervous system. While probiotics are important, so are prebiotics. Prebiotics are fibrous foods that give the good gut bacteria something to feed off of.

Bring back family meals — It may sound like a simple or old fashioned notion that sitting around the table can make you healthier, but it’s true. As humans, we are social creatures. In cultures where families eat together and have strong bonds, people live longer, more fulfilling lives.

If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of wellness to the most amount of people, what would that be?

I have recently been thinking that we need to go on an electronics fast. Everyone take 7–10 days off of television, computers, and phones. I did this very thing when I went to Italy for eight days. It was amazing how much more creative and relaxed I felt. When I came home, I was less likely to do blind-surfing and instead only turned on my computer or television with a purpose in mind.

What are your “5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started” and why?

1. Nobody cares that you’re under 5 feet tall. Elevation only matters in attitude. Stand tall and smile big.

2. You will have a few regrets. If not, you didn’t take enough chances.

3. Don’t get mad. You can’t control others, you can only control how you react to them.

4. Don’t be afraid to be fiercely smart. Learn everything you can, then go learn more.

5. Always, always have a mentor so that one day you can mentor someone else.

Sustainability, veganism, mental health and environmental changes are big topics at the moment. Which one of these causes is dearest to you, and why?

I would have to say mental health. We need to get to the root of the problem. There is too much anger in the world. I believe that half of mental issues could be solved if we just made a choice to love, respect, and include those around us.

What is the best way our readers can follow you on social media?

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/jgamanspeaker/

Twitter @judy_gaman

Instagram @judygaman

Website: www.judygaman.com

Thank you for these fantastic insights!

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