maintaining mental integrity long term – lifestyle approaches work better than pills!

Mental health is a major concern in today’s aging population, with Alzheimer’s disease being the number one cause of age-related cognitive decline and the third cause of death in the USA, after heart disease and cancer. Without effective prevention and treatment, it has been estimated that there will be 160 million people suffering from Alzheimer […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres on our open platform. We publish pieces as written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team and must meet our guidelines prior to being published.
dig
dig

Mental health is a major concern in today’s aging population, with Alzheimer’s disease being the number one cause of age-related cognitive decline and the third cause of death in the USA, after heart disease and cancer. Without effective prevention and treatment, it has been estimated that there will be 160 million people suffering from Alzheimer by 2050 in the world, leading to potential bankruptcy of the Medical system. There are, however, good news regarding Alzheimer’s prevention and even reversal.

Recent scientific studies show that lifestyle changes have incredible effects on reversing Alzheimer symptoms. Unlike the disappointing results obtained from pharmacological therapy, personalized programs including exercising the body and brain as well as eating wholesome foods resulted in marked improvement. In fact, at the end of the study, almost all the participants following the lifestyle adjustments proposed by MEND therapy (metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration) were found to be in the normal range on testing for memory and cognition. Functionally, this amounts to a cure. If you would like to learn more, please refer to this article recently published in Blue Zones.

note: this post was originally published in the Best Health Spring 2019 newsletter, available at http://www.besthealth.life

Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

Community//

Alzheimer’s and Women’s Health, an Urgent Call

by Lisa Mosconi, PhD
Community//

Are You Post-Menopausal with a Family History of Dementia?

by Lisa B. Capp
Community//

Dancing Can Help Prevent Dementia

by Amy Florian
We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.