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“Listen to easy, instrumental music.” With Dr. William Seeds &

During hard times, the gravity of a situation clouded my ability to realize simple steps that I consciously know will make me feel better. So, after a particularly difficult challenge in my life, I wrote out a “Happiness List” so that the next time I found myself in a rut, I had a simple checklist […]

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During hard times, the gravity of a situation clouded my ability to realize simple steps that I consciously know will make me feel better. So, after a particularly difficult challenge in my life, I wrote out a “Happiness List” so that the next time I found myself in a rut, I had a simple checklist to refer to. I could then reference the list and act, without actively having to think about what to do.


As a part of my series about the things we can do to remain hopeful and support each other during anxious times, I had the pleasure of interviewing Aaron Loring Davis.

Aaron Davis is co-founder and CEO of Exploration. Prior to Exploration, he was the software architect for Business Frame (a software and digital marketing consultancy) and InternetCE.com (an online learning company). A native of Raleigh, NC earned a BS in Business Administration from UNC-Wilmington and is a self-taught engineer. He enjoyed an international rugby career, holds multiple patents, and loves his dog. https://www.linkedin.com/in/aaronloringdavis/


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. Is there a particular book that made a significant impact on you? Can you share a story or explain why it resonated with you so much?

Meditations, Marcus Aurelius. I appreciate how stoic philosophy provides a pragmatic operating system for dealing with life, without a lot of mysticism. This particular text presents lessons and ideas in short nuggets that are as true and relevant today, as they were when they were written 2,000 years ago. A personal favorite is “Don’t talk about what a good man should be, just be one.” I find this simple verse to be profound, as it reminds me that action, not talking about action, is what really matters.

Ok, thank you for all that. Now let’s move to the main focus of our interview. Many people have become anxious from the dramatic jolts of the news cycle. The fears related to the coronavirus pandemic have heightened a sense of uncertainty, fear, and loneliness. From your perspective can you help our readers to see the “Light at the End of the Tunnel”? Can you share your “5 Reasons To Be Hopeful During this Corona Crisis”? If you can, please share a story or example for each.

The Covid-19 pandemic has forced all of us to alter and hone our ability to work remotely, and I believe this will be fortuitous on the other side.

1.) We’ve been reassured of the merit and value of being able to work remotely.

2.) Out of necessity, we have learned to communicate asynchronously, as a result of not being in the office at the same time.

3.) Businesses that are finding ways to operate during the pandemic: ones that have solid fundamentals, provide real value to their customers, and exhibit the patience and fortitude to persevere will only see their worth increase on the other side of this thing.

4.) As businesses have been forced to work remotely, their location and that of their customers’ has become much less important. Inasmuch, the door has opened to court customers and partners across the world. The potential total addressable market has expanded many, many times.

5.) Much the way the size of the potential market has increased, we can look forward to having a global talent pool now that offices can be as close as the next Zoom call, regardless of where the staff is located physically.

From your experience or research what are five steps that each of us can take to effectively offer support to those around us who are feeling anxious? Can you explain?

During hard times, the gravity of a situation clouded my ability to realize simple steps that I consciously know will make me feel better. So, after a particularly difficult challenge in my life, I wrote out a “Happiness List” so that the next time I found myself in a rut, I had a simple checklist to refer to. I could then reference the list and act, without actively having to think about what to do.

Here are some suggestions:

  • Move my body for 30 minutes — yoga, dance, walking, running, swimming…just move until I sweat
  • A good, long shower
  • Drink a liter of water and eat a clean, light meal with plenty of vegetables and fish or chicken
  • Connect with an old friend and with a stranger
  • Walk in nature

What are the best resources you would suggest to a person who is feeling anxious?

  • Meditation in all its forms: Guided through an app, sitting still focusing on the breath moving easily in and out of the body
  • Creating something — music, picture, writing a letter
  • Helping another person has a beautiful effect and makes you feel better also.
  • Listening to easy, instrumental music. My favorites are Chilled Cow on YouTube and SomaFM Groove Salad.
  • Journaling or writing. Writing is cool, as it requires my brain to organize my thoughts into sentences or sentence-like structure. This can be incredibly cathartic, as having organized our thoughts helps me to understand them more fully, in addition to ‘getting it out.’
  • Get out of my head and into my body. I just move my body until I’m sweating.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Do you have a story about how that was relevant in your life?

Facta, non verba — Deeds not words. Talk is cheap. Action is what matters.

Don’t talk about what a good man should be, just be one. —Marcus Aurelius

Burning Man…and life, are Doacracies. You can do just about anything you want, but YOU have to do it. I learned this lesson when building and bringing a piece of art to the annual pilgrimage in the desert. I was trying to identify what I would create, my friend reminded me that I could do anything…but it would be me and me alone that had to do it. I had to build it. I had to transport it out there. I had to set it up and manage it during the festival. And I surely had to be responsible for taking it down at the end. I had to DO it. Much like life.

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

Free Education. I’m not aware of many problems this world faces that can’t be rectified with education. The rising tide raises all boats.

What is the best way for our readers to follow you online?

https://exploration.io

Thank you for these fantastic insights. We wish you only continued success in your great work!

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People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

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