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Lessons on Sobriety from Michael Jordan’s The Last Dance

I am loving my new routine of snuggling up on the couch on Sunday night’s with my family.We are enthralled with Michael Jordan’s Documentary, The Last Dance. It’s an incredible show that has me on the edge of my seat every week.  The show somehow has me laughing, crying, and mostly remembering my glorious high […]

I am loving my new routine of snuggling up on the couch on Sunday night’s with my family.We are enthralled with Michael Jordan’s Documentary, The Last Dance.

It’s an incredible show that has me on the edge of my seat every week. 

The show somehow has me laughing, crying, and mostly remembering my glorious high school years in the 90’s. 

It brings me right back.  

Thankfully Netflix and ESPN teamed up with Spotify to create an official dance playlist.

There is so much to learn about success in anything, but I can’t help but relate this story to the challenge of my life which was beating alcohol. 

5 Takeaways for Sobriety from The Last Dance:

Fail Forward

Michael Jordan has unbelievable talent, but what you see so clearly in this documentary, is that it was his practice, determination, and will that made him the GOAT. 

His ultra competitive nature is what put him above the rest. Failure made him work even harder. 

 “I’ve missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. Twenty-six times, I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.”-Michael Jordan

Ditching the drink is not an exact science and there is not one way to do it. There is no rule book or right way. 

There is a unique combination of tools and support that work for each individual person. There are many paths and pathways. All usually include many attempts and many Day 1’s. 

Relapse is not starting over. 

It’s starting again with a lesson learned. 

Having a slip, doesn’t take away from all the progress you’ve made. 

Just because you tried and failed, doesn’t mean you will always fail. 

If you are trying you are not failing. 

Keep trying. 

Try new. 

Try different. 

Add more support. 

Everyday you show up to yourself and do the work of fighting cravings, tuning into yourself, and feeling your feelings, you are one step farther away from your last drink. 

There is no failure.

Keep going.

Team

MJ himself says there are plenty of teams in sport that have the best players, but never win championships, the Chicago Bulls, however won many. 

To be successful in our endeavors we all need a team of people to support us. 

You need a community, camaraderie, mentors, and friends. 

You are not alone and having the support of others can make all the difference. 

Alcoholics Anonymous introduced the value of community in the recovery world. 

These days, there are many options for alcohol free communities. 

Jenn Kautch of SoberSis has created a community for faith based women. 

1000 Hours Dryfounded by Kayla Lyons is an Instagram network of people exploring the value of health and living without booze. 

SheRecoversis a mission to bring women together in sharing circles in cities around the nation and an annual retreat. 

One Year No Beer is a program from the UK but has members in 120 countries. 

To be successful in your recovery, finding a support group is a must. 

Try New Things

Michael continued to challenge himself to new endeavors before, during and after his phenomenal basketball career. 

Baseball, golf, and even restaurant ownership. 

He never stops learning and he never stops pushing himself to be better. 

He is not afraid to try new things, in part because he doesn’t fear failure. 

Mental preparation is everything and he keeps his confidence by trying new things, instead of only sticking to what he is good at. 

The average person might feel defeated immediately when trying something new, but Michael just tries harder. 

Sobriety is a practice. 

You get better at it, by practicing it. 

You don’t have to do it perfectly. 

There is no perfect way. 

You can always improve.

The first time you do it. 

The next time you do it better.  

Your first sober night out, your first sober wedding, your first sober vacation, they all improve with time. 

You get better knowing what works for you, as you get deeper into your sobriety. 

Ditching the drink is the gateway to many other healthy habits, but it takes time and it doesn’t happen all at once.

Don’t be afraid to be bad at something and just because it’s not perfect doesn’t mean it’s not progress.   

Who cares what people think?

This is a tough one, but you just have to accept you might be the villain in some else’s story. 

Perhaps perfectionism and people pleasing were issues that you drank to cope with in the first place.

You are a mirror for other people and when you quit drinking, it shines a light on their own drinking habits. 

That is not for you to worry about. 

You will never control what people think. 

You can only control yourself.

You believe your truth and march to the beat of your drum. 

This is so important when you give up alcohol. 

Not everyone has to agree with you or understand you.

It doesn’t matter. 

The only person that you needs your approval is you. 

Get a Great Coach

Phil Jackson is one of my favorite leaders of all times. 

Maybe because he reminds me of my Uncle Steve?

But really, his leadership is incredible. 

Imagine coaching all those egos and he makes it look easy!

He led The Chicago Bulls with spirit, meditation, and compassion. 

All his players were good, but with his coaching they were amazing.

Each player improved and played to their best ability. 

A good coach can enhance your skills and bring out the best in you too. 

I help my client’s everyday to align with their highest selves to do their greatest good. 

I add value to my client’s journey because I have been where they are. 

I have resources, tips and tricks to share. 

I have a listening ear, and a compassionate heart. 

I offer strategies to get them unstuck and a new perspective to keep them going. 

I am a cheerleader, a teacher, a mentor, and a friend. 

You are not expected to quit drinking on your own. 

It may be possible, but is so much less painful when you have someone supporting you. 

You can take their lessons learned and apply them to your life. 

If you are questioning drinking, get yourself a coach, like me.

Find someone that has what you want and ask them for help. 

A coach will encourage you and challenge you to rise to your best. 

Even Michael Jordan benefited from a coach!

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