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Lead others with kindness and power, not because of who they are, but because of whom you know they can be.

The labeling theory (from sociology) is real. Labels are powerful. A label on a can of food tells us what we are eating.A label on piece of clothing tells us the quality of what we wear.A label on electronics tells us the origins of the product. Most of the time, the labels are pretty accurate. […]

The labeling theory (from sociology) is real.

Labels are powerful.

  • A label on a can of food tells us what we are eating.
  • A label on piece of clothing tells us the quality of what we wear.
  • A label on electronics tells us the origins of the product.

Most of the time, the labels are pretty accurate.

It is the same with us humans.

We live up to our labels. We become our labels.

Our labels become the expectations we have for ourselves and for others.

We can choose our own labels; we can help others choose theirs as well.

Labels can hurt or labels can help.

Labels can kill your spirit. They can kill your team's spirit.

Don't let the wrong labels define you or others.

If we listen to negative labels, our performance will diminish. That is why positive self-talk is so important. We believe the stories we tell ourselves, so we need to tell ourselves the right ones.

Just like us, our team takes labels seriously.

If you can, get rid of the bad labels. You always can.

The best leaders apply the best labels.

When the label we have attached to ourselves inspires us to be better, to reach higher, to do more – then that is a good label.

Great leaders know their people.

Great leaders have empathy and show kindness.

If you believe in someone, and label them with courage, they will perform for you.

Don’t worry, you don’t have to be perfect, you are a great leader because you care more.

The most effective way to label someone is to do it with kindness, thoughtfulness, and appreciation.

You must first think about them, think about their needs, see their skills, and imagine their future. Once you can see the future, you can help them create it by calling it out, with labels.

When you label someone, follow this formula:

Thank you for being…

Thank you for being kind.

Thank you for being flexible.

Thank you for being hardworking.

Thank you for being so thoughtful.

Thank you for being so trustworthy.

Thank you for being willing to go the extra mile for our clients.

Thank you for being... you.

These labels show appreciation, they show thoughtfulness and they show kindness.

The best, most helpful label is present tense, the appreciation is real, and the kindness can be felt.

As the people you lead they live up to the labels you create, your influence multiplies.

As a leader your words are powerful. As you label people as hardworking, flexible, and trustworthy, they will always live up to those labels.

*Your Turn: What are some other labels the best leaders use to lead with kindness while driving results? 

P.S. - I’ve created a quick guide for mastering professional relationships, immediately. If you follow this one MAIN truth and actionable steps found inside, your whole life will improve, quickly.

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