Lathan Craft Of Made for Purpose: “Disrupting an industry is negative when you chase the dream before you cast the vision”

Available, when you think of CEOs, or when you think of Founders, or Pastors or anything like that, the first word you think of after that normally is not ‘availability.’ That is probably the antonym of a lot of those titles, however, in everything I do, every business I own, every book I write, every […]

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Available, when you think of CEOs, or when you think of Founders, or Pastors or anything like that, the first word you think of after that normally is not ‘availability.’ That is probably the antonym of a lot of those titles, however, in everything I do, every business I own, every book I write, every podcast I’m on, I want to be available…because people matter.


As a part of our series about business leaders who are shaking things up in their industry, I had the pleasure of interviewing Lathan Craft.

Lathan Craft is an international best-selling author, speaker, and business owner who believes hope and belonging are necessities and the Church is not supposed to be a country club. Lathan is the founder of Made for Purpose, a coaching and consulting business helping people work in their design and description. Ultimately, Lathan has devoted his life to researching and articulating the importance of belonging, and how words truly can change the world.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Before we dig in, our readers would like to get to know you a bit more. Can you tell us a bit about your “backstory”? What led you to this particular career path?

If there was one word to describe my backstory it would be hopelessness. Growing up, much of my childhood was without both parents. They died at separate times when I was a young age, and I was raised by my grandparents. But really, I felt like all my life nobody really understood me, nobody could relate, nobody saw me. That is why I am pursuing this path in life, specifically with Made for Purpose. It is simply based on the reality that I don’t want anybody to experience what I experienced.

Can you tell our readers what it is about the work you’re doing that’s disruptive?

I believe what’s so disruptive about Made For Purpose is that it doesn’t settle for the ‘that’s the way it’s always been’ excuse. For instance, many people when working in corporate America really lose their passion, or what they feel they were created to do. Essentially people have conformed to their job description, thereby sacrificing their design, instead of figuring out how their job description conforms to their humanity. Many people out there talk about ‘corporate America’ and they will encourage you to quit your job and go after your passion. I think you can do both. I don’t think you have to quit your job to feed your passions, I believe you can bloom where you’re planted and contribute right where you are. This is a huge disruption to the personal development space.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

Hindsight is 20/20, right? So initially it was not very funny, but I think the funniest mistake I made when I first started is not keeping it a secret. I was so excited about my idea I told everyone and did not realize that some people liked my idea just as much as I did and trademarked it and everything before I even bought the domain name (which they bought as well)! The lesson I learned from that is to be very picky about who I let in my circle, who I confide in, and who I dream with. I almost have a vetting process for that now, and time is the main measuring point.

We all need a little help along the journey. Who have been some of your mentors? Can you share a story about how they made an impact?

When I think about a personal mentor of mine, I think of Bob Goff. If you know Bob he’s a very happy-go-lucky guy, and I remember the first time I talked to him he had all of these big dreams for me that I didn’t see for myself — couldn’t see for myself. After a long conversation with Bob about why I could not see those things, I realized that there were things written on the walls of the cave of my heart, these limiting beliefs that became my reality. I had to do some deep work within myself and erase the lies that told me I did not belong, that I wasn’t good enough, and replaced them with truths of every human being, I am valued, I am enough, I am important, and what I contribute matters.

In today’s parlance, being disruptive is usually a positive adjective. But is disrupting always good? When do we say the converse, that a system or structure has ‘withstood the test of time’? Can you articulate to our readers when disrupting an industry is positive, and when disrupting an industry is ‘not so positive’? Can you share some examples of what you mean?

This is such a great question, when disrupting an industry is not so positive I think of an example in my hometown. These past couple of years my hometown has been busting into a realm of creativity and imagination that has not been true of the ‘withstood the test of time’ mentality that has been the monopoly there. A couple of individuals came together and built a group co-working space in the same spot that the skating rink in our city used to be. Which, for someone like me, could not have been both more brilliant and more beautiful. It was an entrepreneur’s dream! However, as soon as COVID hit, they had to shut down, and I’ll never forget the owner of the co-working space’s remarks in the local TV station the day they announced they were shutting down: “I think this was a great idea, I just think we were too early.” Disrupting an industry is negative when you chase the dream before you cast the vision.

On the other hand, disrupting an industry is positive when something is already stirring in the water. For instance, I have a podcast called The Other Side of the Church which is essentially dreaming about what the Church could be if we just took the time to listen. Ten years ago, that podcast would have no relevance and would be like the group co-working spot in my hometown. However, because so many conversations have initiated in so many different contexts, any time I talk about the podcast people know exactly what I mean and want to be a part of it, why? Because the vision has been cast in their own circles, that now when someone else is casting the vision in their circles the dream starts to look more like a reality.

Can you share 3 of the best words of advice you’ve gotten along your journey? Please give a story or example for each.

Man, there are so many honestly. Three words of advice are hard to come by. However, if I could boil down the advice that I have built as my foundation it would be: available, attainable, and intentional.

Available, when you think of CEOs, or when you think of Founders, or Pastors or anything like that, the first word you think of after that normally is not ‘availability.’ That is probably the antonym of a lot of those titles, however, in everything I do, every business I own, every book I write, every podcast I’m on, I want to be available…because people matter.

Attainable, many people (and honestly, I don’t know why) don’t want to share how they built the platform they stand on. This is ironic, because a lot of people, if not ALL people who have ‘platforms’ didn’t have them by happenstance. They Googled, they researched, they had lots of conversations, but now when you ask them building-type questions they feel unattainable. Honestly, in my obituary, I want to say that I left a template and not a title. Templates are easy to contextualize and put personality into, titles are very individual. I want everything I do to be attainable. Humans are creative beings, those who have gone before them should simply be a mile marker, not a closed door.

We are sure you aren’t done. How are you going to shake things up next?

Haha! Such a great question! I am really fascinated with the topic of pain. I would actually argue if you are anything like myself, pain is more fluent than your native tongue. But I think many people view ‘pain’ as a time-out of sorts. Life stops. There is not a lot of hope, and you just kind of wait. But what if there was a purpose to the pain? What if the pain was more of a catalyst than a consequence? I am working on creating something to help people find purpose in their pain and point it to people.

Do you have a book, podcast, or talk that’s had a deep impact on your thinking? Can you share a story with us? Can you explain why it was so resonant with you?

I am a huge fan of Brene Brown, I believe the work she has done is timeless and treasured by so many people. Her TedTalk on the power of empathy has always been a favorite of mine for two reasons. One, it gave language to what I was missing from people. Two, the amount of people that reacted to it told me there was so much to be discovered. Quite honestly if I explained or described her TedTalk video it certainly would not do it justice. I encourage you to go to Youtube and type in Brene Brown Empathy TedTalk to watch it. I believe it to be transformative for each and every human being.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

Any time I am asked a question like this, I always think about the quote that has inspired me lately, because I believe humans are constantly learning, therefore quotes are more powerful to us depending on the season that we find ourselves in. With that considered, the quote that I have found to be my favorite for quite a while now is in the form of a question, and it is simply “What else is possible?” As humans we are given a certain amount of time on Earth, we do not know how long we are given, death is the great disruptor, so while we have breath in our lungs…what else is possible?

You are a person of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

If I could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, it would be for the Church to stop acting like a country club and more like a community center. I fully believe the Church is the representative for all the answers that are swirling in our society today, but it has been way too silent and way too exclusive. I believe the Church should be a hope factory, and for far too long it has been suffocation of hope for a lot of people, whether intentionally or unintentionally. So, inspiring a movement would simply be doing CPR on the Church, and breathing the breath back into it to be what it was designed to be.

How can our readers follow you online?

You can go to my website www.lathancraft.com, and that will take you to whatever you need, all of the links are there for all of the different things that I’m a part of, and you can put your email down to be the first to know about different things and when they launch and where I am and what I’m doing.

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

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