Community//

Kindness…

Lets Reach Higher

Photo by Jacek Dylag
Photo by Jacek Dylag

Some of us still remember Diana Ross singing “Reach out and Touch” in 1970. While I was 11 at the time, it was then and still is a solid message for love and kindness.

“Reach out and touch

Somebody’s hand

Make this world a better place—if you can….” 

I was for it then and all for it today. 

Now, fast forward 40 years, and with a similar message, Ellen DeGeneres spoke this week of rooting for the Packers, her new iPhone, and her friend George Bush. Ellen brilliantly spoke of “kindness” among different thinkers with different ideas.  

Unlike the Diana Ross song, Ellen’s message of kindness has been interpreted by some as elitist.

However, not everyone’s on that page, and here’s my take.

Currently, many of us have followed the current trend of commenting, reacting, and responding to anything that is put out on the wires.  And not just responding, but instead being outraged. We have become a country of reactors, as opposed to a nation of those who take personal leadership to actually create change, as opposed to calling out what is different.

We must be more significant than our words and, instead, rely on our actions. I think about it, am admittedly guilty of it at times, and remind myself of the importance of actions over words… 

In my job, I am mindful and focused on ending suffering for all people. I think that’s basically something we all want. 

It’s why I founded Less Cancer—to reduce the incidences of cancer and prevent the kind of pain and suffering that comes with it. 

And it is done purely from the perspective of treating others humanely—and by that I mean all others… as in everyone. Even those, I disagree with or even find pretty rotten.

What if we operated in a world where civility is on our minds, just civility?

What if, as opposed to coming up with the next “good one,” we all did one thing that actually mattered. That every day, we focus on ending suffering, no matter who we are—no matter—we would actually work to end suffering each day.  You don’t have to start an organization or a movement -but possibly just being gentler with ending suffering for all in mind.

If our focus were on something more significant, and if we were all charged with contributing to raising up humanity, we could in fact be addressing real problems.

It doesn’t have to be about cancer. It could be any public issue, such as hunger, or homelessness, or climate change. Working to end suffering doesn’t mean sitting back and being unengaged but rather jumping in and being involved. We can each take steps to work on any of these things to end human suffering.  

So I challenge you to up the kindness game. Let’s make it about ending suffering for all. 

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres. We publish pieces written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Learn more or join us as a community member!
Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

VANCOUVER, BC - OCTOBER 19:  Comedian Ellen DeGeneres seen onstage during "A Conversation With Ellen DeGeneres" at Rogers Arena on October 19, 2018 in Vancouver, Canada.  (Photo by Andrew Chin/Getty Images)
Thrive Global News//

Ellen DeGeneres Has Some Thoughts About Being Kind at Work

by Marissa Muller
Community//

What Stage Will You Shine On?

by Cindy Geier, Success Coach
Community//

Do As The Italians Do

by Kate Kalan

Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

Thrive Global
People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.