Kelli Komondor of of K2 Creative: “Set timers and make lists”

Set timers and make lists — organization is KEY for me when I need to bring things into perspective. And checking things off a list makes me feel accomplished. If you think a task should take you two hours, set a timer and if you’re beyond that two-hour mark — stop! You can revisit when your mind is fresh. Many […]

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Set timers and make lists — organization is KEY for me when I need to bring things into perspective. And checking things off a list makes me feel accomplished. If you think a task should take you two hours, set a timer and if you’re beyond that two-hour mark — stop! You can revisit when your mind is fresh.


Many successful people are perfectionists. At the same time, they have the ability to say “Done is Better Than Perfect” and just complete and wrap up a project. What is the best way to overcome the stalling and procrastination that perfectionism causes? How does one overcome the fear of potential critique or the fear of not being successful? In this interview series, called “How To Get Past Your Perfectionism And ‘Just Do It’, we are interviewing successful leaders who can share stories and lessons from their experience about “how to overcome the hesitation caused by perfectionism.

As a part of this series, I had the pleasure of interviewing Kelli A. Komondor.

Kelli A. Komondor is the president and CEO of K2 Creative, a content, PR & marketing, and branding firm which she started in the middle of the 2020 global pandemic. She is the creator, project manager, and a contributing author of the Amazon bestseller Twenty Won: 21 Female Entrepreneurs Share Their Stories of Business Resilience During a Global Crisis, an anthology of 21 female entrepreneurs sharing their stories of business resilience during the global pandemic. Her chapter, “From Imposter to Inspiration” focuses on how she overcame imposter syndrome to start her business and inspire a group of women to participate in the Twenty Won book.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Before we start, our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. Can you tell us a bit about your childhood backstory?

Sure! I had a relatively typical childhood. My dad was a Vietnam Veteran and worked in sales, my mom was a stay-at-home mom until my younger sister and I were old enough to be home alone and she worked in banking and had front desk positions in medical offices. Our parents were very loving and provided all we needed as kids.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Stand for something or you’ll fall for anything” is something I’ve told my own children for a long time. Don’t just follow the pack — don’t simply go along with what others tell you. Do you own investigating and if you don’t believe in what someone is telling you, stand up and say so!

Is there a particular book, podcast, or film that made a significant impact on you? Can you share a story or explain why it resonated with you so much?

Risking a self-serving answer, it’s truly the Twenty Won book that I curated earlier this year. I collected 20 other female entrepreneurs and asked them to tell their stories of resilience during the global pandemic in 2020. The stories all have such incredible business lessons, but they also have amazing personal stories of triumph and success.

You are a successful business leader. Which three character traits do you think were most instrumental to your success? Can you please share a story or example for each?

Social intelligence — I relate with others and truly care about people.
Honesty — honesty really is the best policy!
Gratitude — I’m thankful for everything I have and take nothing for granted.

Let’s now shift to the main part of our discussion. Let’s begin with a definition of terms so that each of us and our readers are on the same page. What exactly is a perfectionist? Can you explain?

A perfectionist believes nothing is worth doing unless it’s done to perfection. While I KNOW I’ll make mistakes and missteps, I also know that doing my very best for not just my company, but more importantly for my clients, is vital. Additionally, I don’t think you can be a perfectionist unless you own up to any mistakes you make.

The premise of this interview series is making the assumption that being a perfectionist is not a positive thing. But presumably, seeking perfection can’t be entirely bad. What are the positive aspects of being a perfectionist? Can you give a story or example to explain what you mean?

If you gave me a choice of bringing someone on to my team that was a perfectionist or a carefree sort of person, I’d choose the perfectionist every time! Although we’re told not to sweat the small stuff, we perfectionists DO just that, and many times it causes a lot of internal struggles. But what would you rather have — someone who pushes to give their very best all the time or someone who says, “That’s good enough!”?

What are the negative aspects of being a perfectionist? Can you give a story or example to explain what you mean?

The internal struggles for certain! A really good example is when I was creating my media sheet. I time everything I do using an app called Clockify. I’m embarrassed to share the amount of time I spent agonizing over the layout and content of my sheet, but let’s just say this: It was ridiculous! I finally had to have a friend proof it and say THAT’S IT. I do that with a lot of client work too, but it’s a bit easier to “say uncle” because once the client approves something I have to let it go!

From your experience or perspective, what are some of the common reasons that cause a perfectionist to “get stuck” and not move forward? Can you explain?

I loop this back to my main problem in life: Imposter Syndrome. I’ve written and spoken about it so much that you’d think I’d be completely healed by now. When you suffer from Imposter Syndrome you believe that anything good that happens to you isn’t deserved. You constantly compare yourself to others and feel like you’re going to be discovered as a fake. I feel Imposter Syndrome and perfectionism go hand-in-hand. You do the same tasks over and over trying to get a better outcome. It’s frustrating, but I’m learning and getting better every day!

Here is the central question of our discussion. What are the five things a perfectionist needs to know to get past their perfectionism and “just do it?” Please share a story or example for each.

Believe in yourself — if you don’t, no one else will!

Don’t be so hard on yourself — when things get rough, it’s okay to take a breath or step back to reevaluate things.

Understand you will make mistakes — and that’s okay!

Own your mistakes — since errors will happen, you need to own up to them.

Set timers and make lists — organization is KEY for me when I need to bring things into perspective. And checking things off a list makes me feel accomplished. If you think a task should take you two hours, set a timer and if you’re beyond that two-hour mark — stop! You can revisit when your mind is fresh.

You are a person of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be?

I would love to mentor young women (and men) who are winding down their high school years and are uncertain of their next steps. College isn’t for everyone — I wrote about this in Twenty Won: not having a degree has a lot to do with my issues with Imposter Syndrome. I want young adults to know that they can be successful without completing 4 years of college.

Is there a person in the world whom you would love to have lunch with, and why? Maybe we can tag them and see what happens!

So many, but I adore Sarah Jessica Parker and I’d love to get the Twenty Won book in her hands. I know she loves to read! I’d love to chat to both Oprah and Ellen, too!

How can our readers follow you online?

K2CreativeLLC.com is my website and all my social links and additional websites are there.

Thank you so much for sharing these important insights. We wish you continued success and good health!

It’s always a pleasure working with you! Thank you so much!

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