Josef Moser of CryptoRadar: “Being able to make a living on your own is also a very rewarding experience and achievement”

As a TwentySomething founder you really need to be able and willing to learn fast. Most young founders are less experienced than the employees companies they step up against. There are many decisions to be taken, and you have to learn to decide upon these instead of procrastinating. As a part of our series called […]

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As a TwentySomething founder you really need to be able and willing to learn fast. Most young founders are less experienced than the employees companies they step up against. There are many decisions to be taken, and you have to learn to decide upon these instead of procrastinating.


As a part of our series called “My Life as a TwentySomething Founder”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Josef Moser.

Josef Moser an Austria-based entrepreneur and co-founder of Cryptoradar. Josef obtained an MSc in Entrepreneurship from Lund University in Sweden and has launched several startup companies in the past.


Thank you so much for joining us in this interview series! What is your “backstory”?

Becoming an entrepreneur was probably something that was put into my cradle. Even from a young age I enjoyed talking about economics with my father, who is a small business owner himself. While many of my friends played FIFA on their consoles, I was building an airline empire in the simulation game Airline Tycoon or leading a new metropolis to success in Sim City.

After graduating from high school, I set out to learn the tools and skills I needed to become a successful entrepreneur. Being an educated software-developer as well as a MSc in Entrepreneurship gave me both the technical and managerial capacity required to develop successful software businesses.

Can you share the funniest or most interesting story that happened to you since you started your company? What lessons or takeaways did you take out of that story?

The funniest thing about our company is probably how it came to exist. Two friends of mine and I wanted to create a new platform in the crypto space, but we didn’t quite know what exactly it should be about. So we rented a summer house in the Austrian Alps and bought a crate of beer, destined to find a viable business model.

And what should I say? Within 72 hours, we built the first prototype of Cryptoradar. Three years later we are a profitable business, without any major adjustments to our platform’s value proposition.

What do you think makes your company stand out? Can you share a story?

We think that there is a serious lack of inclusion in Finance, with many assets and investment being limited to accredited investors. With Cryptoradar, we are making a contribution in building the blockchain-based future of the financial system that will be open and accessible to everyone. Our platform is transparent and helps regular people like you and me improve their financial situation.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story?

There are so many people I have to thank for helping me along the way. But I would like to highlight two of those: one is Josias, one of my longest lasting friends and a co-founder of Cryptoradar. Even though he is the same age as I am, he inspired me to deep dive into programming and his support and technical expertise was crucial for me along the way. The other one is Prof. Frédéric Delmar, who was a professor at my alma mater and really helped me develop the critical mindset that is crucial for assessing business opportunities.

I remember one mentoring session with him vividly: my project partner and I were presenting our business idea, as he interrupted us and questioned numerous assumptions we made, and we weren’t able to answer any of them. He described this method as his “though love”, helping us develop our ideas by showing us the flaws and unknowns in our concept. This session really helped me understand how an entrepreneur thinks, and what questions I need to ask myself whenever I run into a business opportunity.

Are you working on any exciting projects now?

We are currently working on an exciting rebranding of our platform and aim to launch it to customers this summer.

How have you used your success to bring goodness to the world?

I think that the modern day financial system is broken. For instance, small retail investors are excluded from many investments, while unelected central bankers make important decisions that can cause hardship for many.

With Cryptoradar, we are aiming to contribute to a better financial system. We want to help small retail investors, like you and me, make sense of this new asset class and, in doing so, help revolutionize the financial system, to become an open, and democratic system that works for everyone and not just the elites.

Do you have a favorite book that made a deep impact on your life? Can you share a story?

My favorite book is Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki. What’s inspiring about this book is that you can easily see how your thinking manifests what you become. The book perfectly shows that entrepreneurs view the world differently, and that by changing the way you think, you can pave your way for success. It also gives great clarity on some business fundamentals such as understanding assets vs. liabilities.

Can you share 5 of the most difficult and most rewarding parts of being a “TwentySomething founder”. Please share an example or story for each

As a TwentySomething founder you really need to be able and willing to learn fast. Most young founders are less experienced than the employees companies they step up against. There are many decisions to be taken, and you have to learn to decide upon these instead of procrastinating.

This also means that your everyday life will be more stressful and work-intense than that of your peers.

But while all of this is a challenge, it is also an opportunity to think outside the box and come up with new, creative ways in providing value to your customers in a better, more effective way. This freedom is something you do not get in most other career paths.

Being able to make a living on your own is also a very rewarding experience and achievement.

The biggest reward, however, of being a TwentySomething founder is the personal growth you will experience. You will learn how to step outside of your comfort zone and push the limits of what you can do. And in doing so you will gain more skills, knowledge and experience than some people during their whole career.

What are the main takeaways that you would advise a twenty year old who is looking to found a business?

I think it’s important to understand that success usually does not come overnight. If you are twenty, you still have plenty of time and should concentrate on learning about business first. After graduating from college, I worked as an IT consultant for a couple of years, and this helped me a lot in understanding how different types of organizations work.

We are very blessed that some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might see this. 🙂

There are many forward thinkers in our industry which I would love to have lunch with such as Elizabeth Stark, Sam Bankman-Fried, or Su Zhu. But if I had to pick one person, I would actually go for the former German soccer player Bastian Schweinsteiger. Schweinsteiger wasn’t the player with the best technique, the best at scoring nor the fastest. But he had this unstoppable willingness to succeed that made him a living legend in Germany. His ability to swallow any setbacks and (physical) pain, and still give his very best until the last minute is truly inspiring.

What is the best way our readers can follow you on social media?

The best way to follow me is on Twitter.

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

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