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Jordan Sutton, Goosechase: “Don’t try to get signed to a record label”

Don’t try to get signed to a record label. The way deals work now due to lack of album sales puts you in a ton of debt that’s hard to get out of. Never do presale tickets. It’s the venue’s job to get people to come to the venue. While promoting yourself helps your job is […]

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Don’t try to get signed to a record label. The way deals work now due to lack of album sales puts you in a ton of debt that’s hard to get out of.

Never do presale tickets. It’s the venue’s job to get people to come to the venue. While promoting yourself helps your job is to play. Not pay to play. I’ve paid several times smaller shows that ended up not helping much. Ultimately what it does is hurt smaller musicians starting off who don’t have a fan base yet.

Always get your music mixed and mastered. I didn’t set aside time or money for this starting off. Mixing and mastering by a professional really put everything in its right place and it will sound better at the end of the day.


As a part of our series about rising music stars, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Jordan Sutton (Goosechase), an independent alternative artist hailing from Denison, TX, who explores diverse musical terrain in his work. His “DIY” approach to songwriting and producing allows Jordan to capture the exact sound that is bouncing around in his head, without feeling pressure from a label to be something that he’s not, a self-described “working-class indie kid.”

Beginning his artistic life as a drum line musician in high school, Jordan found music as an escape from normality; a way to get over someone or help another through a tough time when feeling like they weren’t enough. After graduating high school and attempting to make it in the music scene in Denton, TX, Jordan realized that college was taking up all of his time and set aside his musical ambitions. After moving back from college, he began releasing one song a year and eventually landed a spot touring with a local musician. During this time, Jordan realized just how much he missed writing, left the touring life, and planned a move to Austin, TX in an attempt to have more opportunity for his craft there. The move was in January 2020, and due to the pandemic, Jordan moved back to Denison after just 5 weeks in Austin. Throughout quarantine, Jordan was able to finish producing his debut EP Labor of Love which was released on February 14th.


Thank you so much for joining us in this interview series! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

I grew up in a small town north of Dallas, TX called Denison. I went with my family to a local Baptist Church as a kid and teen. That’s how I got started with music. I spent most of my time with a small group of friends playing music and going to the now-defunct skatepark.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

I played drums and was in drumline all through my teen years. I guess what led me to my specific path was playing local shows with my friends in a band. I wrote lyrics at home beforehand (they were terrible). Slowly, I got to the point where I think I wanted to do more. Some of the local bands were rude to myself and a few others. I think I remember looking up at one of the local bands I didn’t get along with particularly well and thinking “I could do that”. I guess that’s sort of how I ended up here.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

My career has been very off and on and more of a hobby for the last 10 years. This band has really only existed for about 3 of those at best. The most recent one that really sticks out to me was how my music video was made. I finished filming it and I believe the next day I contracted COVID-19. It was just a whim that the 2 people that helped me on that weekend didn’t catch it thankfully.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

Oh man, there are so many from other bands. Technically, I’m still in the starting process with this band. Just don’t do presale tickets, guys.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

Well, currently I’m working on a lot of tracks that I began/made in between April to October. Currently, I have about 2 tracks that I’m finishing when I’m off work. I have maybe 30 to 40 instrumentals that are already recorded. Just working on which fit together for another EP.

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

I think diversity is a big deal that needs to happen. I’m big into film and love that Korean film has become respected by Hollywood. I think diversity allows different points of view to be shown/heard, allows proper representation of a culture or group of people, and can bring people of all walks of life together through basic human emotion to find a similar ground.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Don’t try to get signed to a record label. The way deals work now due to lack of album sales puts you in a ton of debt that’s hard to get out of.
  2. Never do presale tickets. It’s the venue’s job to get people to come to the venue. While promoting yourself helps your job is to play. Not pay to play. I’ve paid several times smaller shows that ended up not helping much. Ultimately what it does is hurt smaller musicians starting off who don’t have a fan base yet.
  3. Always get your music mixed and mastered. I didn’t set aside time or money for this starting off. Mixing and mastering by a professional really put everything in its right place and it will sound better at the end of the day.
  4. Pick and choose what advice to take. A lot of people will say things to try to stop you or things that will hurt. There are way too many examples I can think of where I was treated as if I wasn’t enough. Learn as quickly as possible about what advice is good and what is garbage.
  5. You don’t have to have it all figured out right now. People stumble and make mistakes. Just don’t beat yourself up. Keep going if you love it.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

I get burned out a lot so I can understand that feeling. I guess the biggest thing for me is defining success for yourself. Not letting others define it for you. You’re in the music business for the love of it.

Also, I have some friends that have passed on that I know if they were around they would want me to keep going. Having someone who wants to see you succeed helps too.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

There’s so much wrong in the world and I know that it’s not all fixable..but you have to try. I would just like to see term limits put in place at every level. I’m a moderate and this would help so many different things at so many different levels. The polarization of humanity is hard to watch happen.

At the end of the day, I’d like to see that…. and possibly a borderline Godly love for one another.

After all, I am still a Christian.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

I feel like I’m still at the bottom but that’s ok. I guess I owe more to all the people that pushed me to keep going. Some are still around, the guys in the band Never Meant, my neighbor Aaron, my brother, Kinsley August. Some are not like my old friends Stephen and Tristan.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

I don’t really know if I have one of those haha. Maybe just learning to love yourself is important.

I’ve been through a lot of lack of when it comes to relationships. Some people get sad when they’re in that boat. I don’t because you learn to be so comfortable with yourself. Slowly you learn to go to movies, concerts, etc by yourself and not be bothered by it.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

There are some really nice people out in the world. Not going to use this to shout out some woman though lol. I think I’m kind of over-dating for a good bit unless I move.

Keanu Reeves seems cool. Maybe “the Boss”.

How can our readers follow you online?

I’m basically on all the platforms except twitter.

Just hit me up or message me if you want.

https://linktr.ee/goosechaseband

This was very meaningful, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!

Thank you! You too!


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