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James Rutland of MMR Group (Baton Rouge) Offers Tips for Handling Difficult Conversations

Difficult conversations with a friend, family member, mentor, coworker, or another respected individual might be absolutely terrible to go through in the moment, but there are huge benefits from the uncomfortably honest dialogue. A tough conversation is usually a means of telling a person something that they need to hear, but don’t necessarily want to […]

Difficult conversations with a friend, family member, mentor, coworker, or another respected individual might be absolutely terrible to go through in the moment, but there are huge benefits from the uncomfortably honest dialogue. A tough conversation is usually a means of telling a person something that they need to hear, but don’t necessarily want to hear. It is a great means of helping a person grow through exposure to brutal honesty.

A Moment of Clarity

All people actively practice the art of self-deception in varying degrees. Self-deception is a natural part of self-preservation. Unfortunately, however, self-deception can badly lead people astray to the point that they are harming themselves or others around them. A difficult conversation can often bring a crystal clear moment of clarity to a person that has been indulging a bit too much in self-deception.

Measure of Love

A difficult conversation where a person hits a loved one with a brutal but much-needed truth might not seem like an act of love at first, but that is often exactly what it is. Sometimes only the people that love a person the most can muster the necessary courage needed to confront them with a difficult conversation about the truth.

Resolution

Often times a difficult conversation is a cathartic means to resolve a short or long term conflict that has been brewing between two people. While the initial conversation might be extremely difficult to have, it is likely to usher in a sense of peace between both parties that will ultimately leave everyone involved feeling far better.

Better Focus

Everyone loses focus eventually from what matters most in life. One of the best ways to inform a person that they have gone off course is to confront them with a difficult conversation. The conversation will likely be very unpleasant, however, it will help be the guiding light to ensuring that a person regains their focus on what matters most.

Letting Go

Sometimes the best thing to do in life is also the hardest, which is letting go of mental, social, financial, or other forms of baggage. Baggage can weigh a person down to the point of ruining their life. For example, maybe a person needs to let go of a severely abusive relationship, but they cannot do so. Sometimes a difficult conversation with that person can help them to see what they need to urgently do.

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