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James B. Rutland, MMR Group, How to Have Engaged Employees

One of the secrets to running a successful business is to have a team composed of engaged employees. Businesses and organizations that have individuals willing to go the extra mile tend to be highly successful in both financial terms and of employee retention. There are a number of ways that employees can be engaged and […]

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One of the secrets to running a successful business is to have a team composed of engaged employees. Businesses and organizations that have individuals willing to go the extra mile tend to be highly successful in both financial terms and of employee retention.

There are a number of ways that employees can be engaged and finding the right approach, although sometimes time-consuming, can prove extremely beneficial in the long run.

Managers and Mirrors

One key to having engaged employees is to have managers look in the mirror and examine themselves. Managers who to give orders without putting forth any effort find themselves with disengaged employees. Managers that roll up their sleeves and jump onboard to tackle tasks with their teams, however, often find themselves with employees willing to go above and beyond.

Be Receptive

In order to have engaged employees, companies must be receptive to new ideas and practices. In the past, companies simply put out a standard operating procedure manual and expected employees to follow it. While having a SOP is still a worthwhile practice, it can be helpful to allow employees to make suggestions as to how they feel they might best be utilized.

Balancing Act

More than ever, finding the right work-life balance is important when it comes to keeping employees engaged. Expecting an individual to provide maximum engagement at work while having little time outside of work is not an effective tactic. Organizations that work with employees to provide flexibility within the work-life framework often find their employees are more engaged and more willing to tolerate occasional periods of sacrifice when called upon.

Appreciation

In order to have engaged employees, it is vital those employees feel appreciated. When an employee feels valued and recognized, they are more likely to put forth extra effort for the company.

The Big Picture

In order to get employees engaged, organizations should keep employees apprised of the overall goals and strategies of the entire team. That way, even though an employee might have perceived themselves as just another “cog in the machine,” when they are given the broader picture and can see how they are a vital part of the organization, it leads to improved engagement within the team.

By simply taking the time to implement some of the tactics discussed, companies can find themselves having employees willing to work harder and longer for the company than they previously did.

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