Community//

James B. Pepper Rutland, Baton Rouge, on Email Mistakes to Avoid at all Costs

The average U.S. employee sends or receives 121 emails every single day. Knowing that, it’s easy to understand how so many email mistakes can occur in the course of a week or even a day. Even with the overwhelming amount of emails being sent from your outbox, as a professional, you must commit yourself to […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres on our open platform. We publish pieces as written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team and must meet our guidelines prior to being published.

The average U.S. employee sends or receives 121 emails every single day. Knowing that, it’s easy to understand how so many email mistakes can occur in the course of a week or even a day. Even with the overwhelming amount of emails being sent from your outbox, as a professional, you must commit yourself to not making costly email mistakes. The following are three of the most common mistakes when it comes to email:

Bad Subject Lines

With the amount of emails people are receiving every day, the subject line needs to be catchy enough for them to decide to open it, let alone read it! Additionally, you are much more likely to actually get a response if you use a quality subject line. What should you include in the subject box? Something that will get attention! People are much more likely to open an email if the subject line has a call to action or question in it. For example, if you are sending an email that requires the recipient to respond by a deadline, use that in the subject line. Not only will it get their attention, but it will help everyone stay on track with due dates and deadlines. 

Using “To” “CC,” and “BCC” Incorrectly

One of the most common email mistakes is the misuse of the “to,” “carbon copy,” and “ blind carbon copy”  features. When you want to send an email directly to one person or a group of people, use to “to” functionality. When you are including someone on the email to view, but they don’t need to take any action, carbon copy them. Lastly, when you want to loop someone in on an email thread, but don’t want that person to be seen, blind carbon copy them. 

Including Long Paragraphs

While it may be fine to write using long paragraphs in your work, when it comes to email, it is best to keep it short. Anything that requires an extremely lengthy paragraph is probably worth a phone call instead. When writing emails, keep the paragraphs to a few lines. If you need to use bullet points, do that rather than including the words as a sentence. 

Email is a part of nearly every job there is. You can make costly email mistakes if you aren’t paying attention to the right things. Always include an engaging subject line, preferably one with a call to action. Make sure you are sending the email to the right people in the right fashion, i.e., carbon copy and blind carbon copy people correctly. Lastly, if you want people to read your emails, keep the paragraphs minimal. Three to four lines per paragraph is more than enough. 

    Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

    You might also like...

    Courtesy of Marie Maerz / Shutterstock
    Wisdom//

    15 Email Etiquette Rules Every Professional Should Know

    by Allana Akhtar
    Purpose//

    15 Tips to Perfect Your Email Etiquette

    by Jacquelyn Smith
    <span>Photo by <a href="https://unsplash.com/@neonbrand?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">NeONBRAND</a> on <a href="https://unsplash.com/s/photos/email?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">Unsplash</a></span>
    Thrive Global on Campus//

    How to Email Your Professor

    by Taryn Herlich

    Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

    Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Thrive Global
    People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

    - MARCUS AURELIUS

    We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.