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James B. Pepper Rutland Asks: Are you Creating Burnout for Others?

Burnout is the feeling of fatigue or exhaustion that comes from constant stress and pressure. People can experience burnout physically, academically, emotionally, and mentally. It’s an overwhelming feeling to endure and makes one function less than normal. To figure out if someone is having this overwhelming effect on others, looking at these patterns should help. […]

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Burnout is the feeling of fatigue or exhaustion that comes from constant stress and pressure. People can experience burnout physically, academically, emotionally, and mentally. It’s an overwhelming feeling to endure and makes one function less than normal. To figure out if someone is having this overwhelming effect on others, looking at these patterns should help.

A decrease in Worker Productivity

If the quantity of work or hours are diminishing with employees, this can show wavering emotions including fatigue. When people endure much stress, their mind can go on autopilot as they want to get away from the pressure. So, they are not entirely aware whilst working. Burnout is much like resistance as it takes even more of an effort to do the same amount of work as before.

Quality of Work Drops

If the quantity of work doesn’t swindle, then the quality may definitely be affected negatively. This is especially true in creativity-based jobs where much is dependent on one’s mind. People don’t often think straight when burdened with exhaustion and fatigue. Completing the work seems more of a chore than anything else.

Employees or Colleagues Don’t Speak to You

If coworkers or employees don’t speak to each other or avoid their management, this is a clear indicator that they might be the cause for the burnout. Perhaps these employees and coworkers do not feel comfortable or appreciated by their business. They may avoid speaking as they don’t feel a conversation is welcomed due to harsh management styles or strict the strict workplace environment.

Micro-managing Everyone

Watching over people’s shoulders is a sure way to create fatigue. Not only does a person have to focus on doing their job, but they constantly have to consider the fact that someone is always watching them. This amount of stress and tension may shift their attention away from the job they are trying to do. This may make them focus on the appearance of their work as opposed to their actual performance on the job. So, it is vital not to become that person who is micro-managing coworkers or employees even unintentionally. It is okay to care for the handling and functioning of one’s business. However, it is also okay to show trust and give people the necessary space they require to get the job done efficiently.

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